Search found 20592 matches

by Starlionblue
Thu Mar 11, 2021 1:15 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: what kind of process does a company have to do when she's working on a new livery?
Replies: 25
Views: 2592

Re: what kind of process does a company have to do when she's working on a new livery?

Hello, I know that they'll have to produce multiple concept like what the lufthansa and SAS did,but what are the other part of the process? I guess they can test what they come with on real aircraft or aircraft part. Thanks for your answer! This is really no different from any other branding exerci...

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by Starlionblue
Wed Mar 10, 2021 10:19 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Comparing Boeing 787 and Airbus A350 wing design
Replies: 19
Views: 2950

Re: Few questions about the A310 (and A300)

let me repeat: E-Modulus and max elastic deformation is given by the material. CFRP. bending limits are dependent on these material properties. a thinner profile will show more bending under these load conditions. upper and lower skins are nearer to each other and thus the same deformation leads to...

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by Starlionblue
Wed Mar 10, 2021 5:23 am
Forum: Travel, Polls & Preferences
Topic: Why no Boeing 707 stretch?
Replies: 19
Views: 3666

Re: Why no Boeing 707 stretch?

. the KC-135 (Boeing model 717*) The official designation of the KC-135 is Boeing 717-148. The twin-engine version of the Boeing 717 aircraft - original MD-95 design - are assigned a -200 designation, I.e. Boeing 717-200, and from a review of the data at rzjets.net, many have the Boeing customer co...

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by Starlionblue
Wed Mar 10, 2021 4:31 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Engine out actions
Replies: 8
Views: 1623

Re: Engine out actions

Or, as an old instructor engineer used to tell, if you don’t the problem just wait til it gets bad enough to be a recognizable problem and do that procedure. That's a good one. The process of problem recognition is in many ways more crucial and difficult than problem resolution. If you know what th...

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by Starlionblue
Wed Mar 10, 2021 2:58 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Engine out actions
Replies: 8
Views: 1623

Re: Engine out actions

I would suggest that initially the thrust lever increase could be the auto-thrust increasing to compensate for the speed decay. Subsequent manual intervention, then lower setting / idle for the drift down or descent. We're talking a period of 20 seconds here, from an unexpected event. As said above...

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by Starlionblue
Wed Mar 10, 2021 12:38 am
Forum: Travel, Polls & Preferences
Topic: Why no Boeing 707 stretch?
Replies: 19
Views: 3666

Re: Why no Boeing 707 stretch?

As aeromoe says, the 720 was a shrink and thus shorter than the -100. - 707-120/220: 145'1" long. - 720: 136'9" long. - 707-320/420: 152'11" long. In summary, the 707 was stretched once (-320/-420) and shrunk once (720). Looking at the other family members, the 367-80 prototype was 12...

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by Starlionblue
Wed Mar 10, 2021 12:30 am
Forum: Travel, Polls & Preferences
Topic: Why no Boeing 707 stretch?
Replies: 19
Views: 3666

Re: Why no Boeing 707 stretch?

If nothing else, the 707 suffered from the same problem that the 737 has had. The gear legs were a bit short for stretching. The DC-8, with taller gear, was much more successful in this regard. Boeing seems to favour shorter gear. Compare the 787 with the A350. Granted, the 787 is a smaller aircraft...

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by Starlionblue
Tue Mar 09, 2021 12:30 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Overloading Airliners - easily possible?
Replies: 13
Views: 2408

Re: Overloading Airliners - easily possible?

I'll add to the above that unless you have an engine failure between V1 and acceleration speed, overloading an airliner is unlikely to cause a problem beyond increased fuel burn. Unless your CG is also seriously out of limits, that is. That being said, engine failures do happen, so we'd rather stay ...

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by Starlionblue
Mon Mar 08, 2021 1:54 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Why does JFK's 31L have such a huge displacement?
Replies: 18
Views: 10773

Re: Why does JFK's 31L have such a huge displacement?

I suspect it is so 31L departures can depart at the displaced threshold without impacting 22R ops. First, displaced thresholds are identification points for landings, not takeoffs. So while certainly one could do a mid-field takeoff, a lot of SOPs prohibit it :checkmark: :checkmark: :checkmark: Yea...

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by Starlionblue
Sun Mar 07, 2021 2:22 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Can the IRS be aligned in an hangar?
Replies: 7
Views: 1425

Re: Can the IRS be aligned in an hangar?

I wouldn’t test HF inside either. A lot of radiated energy there and the building will interfere. In fact, I’m sure the AMM will have a prohibition against it. Even being close to a hangar or large building while testing HF can be problematic at times. HF can be problematic at all times. Fixed that...

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by Starlionblue
Sat Mar 06, 2021 8:49 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Qatar Airways threatens Pilots for taxiing with both engines
Replies: 39
Views: 7830

Re: Qatar Airways threatens Pilots for taxiing with both engines

I don't think the inboard will be moving backwards. We don't do pivot turns with a stopped main gear leg. True, if you look at the minimum turn radius diagram for the 35K (Fig 4-3-0-991-001-B01 https://www.airbus.com/aircraft/support-services/airport-operations-and-technical-data/aircraft-character...

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by Starlionblue
Sat Mar 06, 2021 1:23 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Holding the nose wheel off
Replies: 35
Views: 3941

Re: Holding the nose wheel off

In the rare situations with nose gear problems such as the Drumpf shuttle 727 in BOS in the 80's and the JetBlue flight that landed at LAX with the wheel at 90 degrees, is the pilot actually holding the nose up to decrease as much speed as possible or is that incorrect info from the media? Kind of ...

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by Starlionblue
Fri Mar 05, 2021 12:24 pm
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Holding the nose wheel off
Replies: 35
Views: 3941

Re: Holding the nose wheel off

If you hold the nosewheel off you risk slowing to a speed where the tail stalls. That will lead to the nose gear coming down rather too rapidly. I'm not sure the tailplane/elevators will actually get anywhere near their stalling AOA - the aircraft-on-the-ground geometry in most cases wouldn't allow...

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by Starlionblue
Fri Mar 05, 2021 12:17 pm
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Qatar Airways threatens Pilots for taxiing with both engines
Replies: 39
Views: 7830

Re: Qatar Airways threatens Pilots for taxiing with both engines

I've observed a number of single engine taxis by various airlines including Qatar. The most glaring problem is the final turn onto the parking bay. If this turn is sharp enough, the inboard engine will physically be moving backwards during the turn. Thus, if the single engine chosen for taxi happen...

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by Starlionblue
Fri Mar 05, 2021 1:08 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Holding the nose wheel off
Replies: 35
Views: 3941

Re: Holding the nose wheel off

If you hold the nosewheel off you risk slowing to a speed where the tail stalls. That will lead to the nose gear coming down rather too rapidly. As GalaxyFlyer says, "fly" the nosewheel down smoothly. The spoilers have plenty of drag already. The mains start braking depending on the autobr...

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by Starlionblue
Wed Mar 03, 2021 12:08 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: UA 155 Island Hopper Question
Replies: 73
Views: 6740

Re: UA 155 Island Hopper Question

Who is giving Up a widebody captain seat to be a narrow body first officer? I can see downgrading from a widebody captain to a narrow body captain for quality of life, but no way to a narrow body first officer. I'm guessing you've never taken the island hopper. For some pilots it isn't about the mo...

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by Starlionblue
Tue Mar 02, 2021 2:25 pm
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Airbus planes seeming to switch off engines on hold pattern
Replies: 16
Views: 3998

Re: Airbus planes seeming to switch off engines on hold pattern

To add to above explanations, an A330/350 pilot, or any other airline pilot for that matter, would never switch off a normally operating engine in flight other than in an emergency. It would be considered a massive breach of procedure and a safety event. This is especially true in a two engine airc...

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by Starlionblue
Tue Mar 02, 2021 5:57 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Airbus planes seeming to switch off engines on hold pattern
Replies: 16
Views: 3998

Re: Airbus planes seeming to switch off engines on hold pattern

I stand corrected. :white: Thanks. Cheers, Adam No worries. Just nitpicking. The military calls them throttles. Consistent inconsistency that we can dissect is what we live for. :biggrin: :box: :hissyfit: Boeing calls them “thrust levers”. However, it’s still called the Autothrottle. I've been curi...

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by Starlionblue
Sun Feb 28, 2021 11:53 pm
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"
Replies: 281
Views: 16427

Re: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"

Every time I’ve been given a RVR below minimums and I’ve declined the approach clearance, the controller has always asked “what are your minimums?” We tell them, and the controller has always responded, “oh looks like RVR’s come up. RVR is now .... (the minimums I just told them). Maintain xxx unti...

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by Starlionblue
Sun Feb 28, 2021 2:41 pm
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Airbus planes seeming to switch off engines on hold pattern
Replies: 16
Views: 3998

Re: Airbus planes seeming to switch off engines on hold pattern

- It's autothrust on Airbus, not authothrottles. - It's thrust control, not throttle. I stand corrected. :white: Thanks. Cheers, Adam No worries. Just nitpicking. The military calls them throttles. Consistent inconsistency that we can dissect is what we live for. :biggrin: :box: :hissyfit:

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by Starlionblue
Sun Feb 28, 2021 8:32 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"
Replies: 281
Views: 16427

Re: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"

The smoothness comes from two things: - Modern autopilots are very very good. They react faster and can control the trajectory more precisely than fleshbag pilots. - If CATIIIC conditions exist, most likely the air is quite stable. It follows that you won't have much in the way of wind gusts. This m...

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by Starlionblue
Sun Feb 28, 2021 7:57 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"
Replies: 281
Views: 16427

Re: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"

As Woodreau says, there's no point worrying about the RVR once you've commenced the approach. At my operator, if the reported RVR falls below minima and we're above 1000 feet, we go missed. If the same thing happens below 1000 feet, we can go all the way to minima and "have a look". The re...

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by Starlionblue
Sun Feb 28, 2021 7:50 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Airbus planes seeming to switch off engines on hold pattern
Replies: 16
Views: 3998

Re: Airbus planes seeming to switch off engines on hold pattern

Airliners glide very well. If we're slowing down or going down, it is frequently at idle thrust. The engines will be pretty much inaudible from the cabin.

Nitpicks.
- It's autothrust on Airbus, not authothrottles.
- It's thrust control, not throttle.

:old:

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by Starlionblue
Sun Feb 28, 2021 1:37 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Sunwing 737 Runway 28 Landing at SXM on video
Replies: 41
Views: 6582

Re: Sunwing 737 Runway 28 Landing at SXM on video

I was unclear, you can’t violate the policy. The policy is to verbally brief planned deviations from the standard criteria so that the crew is aware of how the approach is intended to be flown and therefore the approach remains within the policy. The operator doesn’t want to make the standard crite...

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by Starlionblue
Sun Feb 28, 2021 12:44 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Fuel flow: Same N1/EPR at different altitudes?
Replies: 9
Views: 1249

Re: Fuel flow: Same N1/EPR at different altitudes?

Basically, same position, but throttles are just rheostats relaying lever angle to the FADEC. Prior to automated engine controls, how was this managed? Did the pilot or FE have to adjust for air density? Which brings up another question: What, exactly, did the throttle on early jet engines actually...

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by Starlionblue
Sat Feb 27, 2021 1:48 pm
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"
Replies: 281
Views: 16427

Re: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"

Ok Mr Starlion...He wasn't a terrorist just a plain straight murderer..I reckon this word is perfect for him. Murderer, yes. But in my opinion not necessarily an evil person. What is known is that he was a sick person, as in he had a diagnosable illness that influenced his behaviour. I have strong ...

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by Starlionblue
Sat Feb 27, 2021 1:13 pm
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"
Replies: 281
Views: 16427

Re: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"

Yeah...this line of yours is now in my head..lol I get it they didn't intend to commit this mistake..thats why its an incident because it happened without intention...the only case I can remember of INTENTIONAL MISTAKE or something like that is of that terrorist who locked the cockpit and smashed t...

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by Starlionblue
Sat Feb 27, 2021 7:17 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"
Replies: 281
Views: 16427

Re: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"

Yeah....its irresponsible and unsafe not only for them but for all the pax and everyone involved. Indeed. However, it still holds true that those pilots didn't go to work that day intending to make a mistake. Yeah...this line of yours is now in my head..lol I get it they didn't intend to commit thi...

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by Starlionblue
Sat Feb 27, 2021 5:48 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"
Replies: 281
Views: 16427

Re: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"

Yeah I agree...but then there are cases of pilots taking out their frustrations for the company at passengers...I remember watching one of the crash documentaries where the captain was a hot head b'tard as how they showed in the documentary I think it was some north link airline crash if I can reme...

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by Starlionblue
Sat Feb 27, 2021 5:38 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"
Replies: 281
Views: 16427

Re: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"

And yet they continued the approach which they weren't trained for...Hope they are suspended. There is no way to draw any firm conclusions like that from the video. One thing to mention is that you can see better from the pointy end. And those approach lights are pretty darned bright when tower tur...

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by Starlionblue
Sat Feb 27, 2021 5:10 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"
Replies: 281
Views: 16427

Re: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"

The METAR interval doesn't really matter as long as the METAR/SPECI is representative of the current conditions. At some airports the ATIS isn't updated for long periods, for example on calm nights. Given the conditions, it seems likely they would have been given RVR by voice from approach and towe...

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by Starlionblue
Sat Feb 27, 2021 4:32 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"
Replies: 281
Views: 16427

Re: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"

The METAR interval doesn't really matter as long as the METAR/SPECI is representative of the current conditions. At some airports the ATIS isn't updated for long periods, for example on calm nights. Given the conditions, it seems likely they would have been given RVR by voice from approach and tower...

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by Starlionblue
Fri Feb 26, 2021 11:39 pm
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"
Replies: 281
Views: 16427

Re: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"

I had an enteraction with Mr Starlion based on this approach issue and I was told that usually pilots decide 30 to 60 minutes prior to landing of what type of approach and all the settings related to that are gonna be in place..I'm guessing for Visual approaches it must be way much easier right ? l...

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by Starlionblue
Fri Feb 26, 2021 2:54 pm
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"
Replies: 281
Views: 16427

Re: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"

Even in VMC weather every approach and landing is an “instrument” approach. When cleared for the visual approach. I’ll fly the plane to intercept the course guidance And fly the instruments all the way down to minimums especially at night. I peek up and look outside every now and then coming down t...

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by Starlionblue
Fri Feb 26, 2021 12:48 pm
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Fuel flow: Same N1/EPR at different altitudes?
Replies: 9
Views: 1249

Re: Fuel flow: Same N1/EPR at different altitudes?

Similar differences on the A350. In the cruise 3000kg/h per engine. At takeoff 8000k+kg/h. N1 not that different.

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by Starlionblue
Fri Feb 26, 2021 4:29 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"
Replies: 281
Views: 16427

Re: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"

BECMG in a METAR means "next two hours gradually". In this case, "BECMG 0150 FG", meaning next two hours gradually 150m visibility and fog. This is a change from 100m visibility, fog and no (operationally) significant cloud. Decoding the first part of the METAR, "020330Z 000...

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by Starlionblue
Fri Feb 26, 2021 1:40 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Cargo Pilots Dropped Off At Passenger Terminal
Replies: 16
Views: 2141

Re: Cargo Pilots Dropped Off At Passenger Terminal

Typically, pax crew just use the pax facilities but get priority. But there are many variations. Just to name a few from various ports: - Crew are taken in a van from the aircraft to a separate building far from the terminals for CI. Another van then picks up groundside. On departure, the process is...

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by Starlionblue
Thu Feb 25, 2021 3:43 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Shortest runway airports with regular A380 service
Replies: 27
Views: 5693

Re: Shortest runway airports with regular A380 service

I believe DUB's longest runway is only 9,000 ft and routinely has a DUB-LAX flight, albeit with an A330-200. A 10,000 ft runway at sea level is quote long. For values of long. We always seem to have to use Flaps 3 on that one. :) I edited my post to be as precise as possible. The DUB runway per wik...

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by Starlionblue
Thu Feb 25, 2021 3:31 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Shortest runway airports with regular A380 service
Replies: 27
Views: 5693

Re: Shortest runway airports with regular A380 service

ElroyJetson wrote:
I believe DUB's longest runway is only 9,000 ft and routinely has a DUB-LAX flight, albeit with an A330-200. A 10,000 ft runway at sea level is quote long.


For values of long. We always seem to have to use Flaps 3 on that one. :)

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by Starlionblue
Thu Feb 25, 2021 3:25 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"
Replies: 281
Views: 16427

Re: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"

I just looked at the BOM JEPP’s and there’s been a big improvement in taxiways there, so that’s an improvement! It's fairly slick as I recall. If memory serves, they have a sort of roundabout system between Papa and Tango. If you've landed on 27, you'll cross 14/32 on Echo 5, then hold on Papa unti...

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by Starlionblue
Thu Feb 25, 2021 3:17 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Gate Scheduling for Widebody Int’l Flights
Replies: 3
Views: 968

Re: Gate Scheduling for Widebody Int’l Flights

AS FGITD says, 45 minutes is an eternity. :) Pretty much any large international airport uses gates intensely at times. Some airports have even more congestion because of a lack of ramp space and tight taxiways. Ho Chi Minh comes to mind. One aircraft pushing can block everyone for 10 minutes. Any p...

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by Starlionblue
Thu Feb 25, 2021 12:19 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Ligthning Strikes.
Replies: 12
Views: 2481

Re: Ligthning Strikes.

We don't always know for sure. Sometimes there's a lot of lighting activity around but we don't see or hear anything concrete. So we might think it is possible, but we are not certain. Other times it feels like Thor himself reaches out and smites the aircraft. You'll see the bolt strike, and hear a ...

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by Starlionblue
Wed Feb 24, 2021 5:50 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"
Replies: 281
Views: 16427

Re: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"

In low viz conditions, holding is very common. Not as many aircraft can land in a given period, and separation is greater.

Other aircraft are pretty hard to see typically, even if you know more or less where they are.

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by Starlionblue
Wed Feb 24, 2021 5:08 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Do ground vehicles in airports run on jet fuel or regular diesel?
Replies: 31
Views: 3796

Re: Do ground vehicles in airports run on jet fuel or regular diesel?

There’s been a few, but not much success. LOL, really? Tell that to Diamond, who have had such success with diesel that they stopped building 100LL DA40s. The DA40, DA42, DA62 and upcoming DA50 all use diesel engines and operate quite nicely on Jet-A. A fine aircraft, but early DA-42s have had issu...

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by Starlionblue
Wed Feb 24, 2021 5:07 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"
Replies: 281
Views: 16427

Re: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"

Chart No 7? Could you please use the reference number to right, e.g. "2-1". By "patterns" do you mean holding patterns? the published hold for ILS27 is over BOKOR, right hand turns. The way the hold is constructed, you could just have exited at BOKOR and continued west on the fin...

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by Starlionblue
Wed Feb 24, 2021 12:20 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Weird planes
Replies: 9
Views: 3199

Re: Weird planes

http://thevane.gawker.com/heres-a-list- ... 1618590928

Image
-->

flipdewaf wrote:
IFlyVeryLittle wrote:
And Satma7 mysteriously vanishes.

He knew too much. RIP :tombstone:


The truth is out there. http://thevane.gawker.com/heres-a-list- ... 1618590928

Image

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by Starlionblue
Wed Feb 24, 2021 12:17 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"
Replies: 281
Views: 16427

Re: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"

In general, unstable air gives more rapidly variable conditions than stable air. One indication of unstable air is low barometric pressure. Moisture content in the air is perhaps the main driver of more "active" weather. In warmer areas like the tropics, the air can hold more moisture. Hen...

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by Starlionblue
Wed Feb 24, 2021 12:14 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Can someone explain all the components of this ORD METAR?
Replies: 29
Views: 3831

Re: Can someone explain all the components of this ORD METAR?

wxtech wrote:
BR is light fog. It is not precipitation. FG is reported with a sfc vis of 1/2 mile or less. BR for 3/4 up to 6 miles.


BR is mist, which I guess is light fog but has its own name. :)

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by Starlionblue
Wed Feb 24, 2021 12:12 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: Pacific Clipperton FIR doubt..!?
Replies: 6
Views: 1169

Re: Pacific Clipperton FIR doubt..!?

I’ve talked to them numerous times, too, but it’s still bogus. There’s no ERCAN FIR, it’s not recognized by ICAO, last I heard. There was a Jepp briefing on the hazards; DOD rules made it clear that it wasn’t to be recognized as controlling Larnaca airspace, which created more hazards. I see what y...

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by Starlionblue
Tue Feb 23, 2021 8:04 am
Forum: Technical/Operations
Topic: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"
Replies: 281
Views: 16427

Re: The Magic of "CAT IIIB"

An ATIS strictly encoded like a METAR, though METAR codes are sometimes used. Different places have different variations of how they write it. Remember ATIS is a spoken collection of information. The digital version might have some abbreviations as you see below, but you can read it out loud easily....

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