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Schweigend
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Mon Jul 06, 2015 6:10 am

Quoting nomadd22 (Reply 99):
All looks good.

Great! Reading about the "anomaly" yesterday on July 4th really dampened my evening and was quite depressing, considering all that New Horizons represents, even though only about a day's worth of data was lost.

Quote:
...full recovery is expected to take from one to several days; New Horizons will be temporarily unable to collect science data during that time.

I am so very glad now to learn that

Quote:
The underlying cause of the incident was a hard-to-detect timing flaw in the spacecraft command sequence that occurred during an operation to prepare for the close flyby. No similar operations are planned for the remainder of the Pluto encounter.

and that

Quote:
The mission science team and principal investigator have concluded that the science observations lost during the anomaly recovery do not affect any primary objectives of the mission, with a minimal effect on lesser objectives.

Phew! What a relief!

By the way, I find the best public website for New Horizons info is the one operated by the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab, who basically run the whole shebang:

http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/

We are all very lucky to be alive and here for this upcoming singular encounter!

I'm already excited to find out what the data stream arriving on 15 July reveals, and I can't wait to read the journal Science's issue that will be devoted to the encounter soon thereafter. Science has been very reliable over the past half-century in dedicating most of an issue to in-depth coverage of the encounters probes have had with planets in our Solar System, from Mariner to Messenger and everything in between....

http://www.sciencemag.org/

Godspeed, New Horizons!
 
canoecarrier
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Mon Jul 06, 2015 7:48 pm

The imagery we'll get tomorrow should be substantially better than the photos released on the 3rd. The spacecraft has passed the 25x distance of the moon to the earth now. Every day should bring amazing discoveries after that. The Pluto system itself is quickly becoming one of the more interesting systems we've explored.
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UA444
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Mon Jul 06, 2015 9:13 pm

I've waited so long to see pics of Pluto up close and have been following this mission from the very beginnings in trying to get it off the ground in the first place. So glad and relieved they figured out the issues, what a nervous weekend it must have been.
 
vikkyvik
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Mon Jul 06, 2015 10:53 pm

Quoting GDB (Reply 94):
Who else cannot wait for all the rest that is soon to come?

I'm raising my hand.

Quoting KarelXWB (Reply 98):
Now in color:

My god that is so cool!

I'm so glad that we still pursue unmanned exploration like this. Hopefully manned will follow one day....
I'm watching Jeopardy. The category is worst Madonna songs. "This one from 1987 is terrible".
 
TheSonntag
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Tue Jul 07, 2015 10:00 am

Good to hear it turns out well. A bad time for a safe mode, but fortunately a few days ago, not in one week.
 
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Thu Jul 09, 2015 8:02 am

Pluto as seen on July 8:

http://oi61.tinypic.com/wk1ar.jpg
What we leave behind is not as important as how we've lived.
 
TheSonntag
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Thu Jul 09, 2015 11:47 am

Wow. Is this reddish-brown the real colour of Pluto? Looks stunning.
 
canoecarrier
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Thu Jul 09, 2015 5:23 pm

It's amazing the detail that the Hubble was able to get from that distance as well. We should get some more photos today. The spacecraft is around 5.5 million Kms and closing.

The beatings will continue until morale improves
 
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Fri Jul 10, 2015 6:34 am

Quoting KarelXWB (Reply 105):
Pluto as seen on July 8:

In 1986, an 8yo me watched with interest as Voyager 2 sent back pictures of Uranus. I'd only learned about that planet a few years before and now there were close-up color pictures. In 1989, a 12yo me watched that same probe's images of Neptune...but now that I was older and I had started to learn about the nature of science (science is a process of discovery, not a collection of facts), I was utterly fascinated.

In 1994, a 16yo me eagerly picked up a copy of Carl Sagan's Pale Blue Dot. As I voraciously devoured the pages in the book, I read his thoughts on Pluto. He had no idea what Pluto was. He thought it might be similar to Triton. It was clear that he desperately wanted to see pictures of the surface and data on the system. His curiosity was palpable and it was also contagious. He made me just as curious about the nature of the world.

For the last time, humanity is about to get a glimpse of one of the original "Nine Planets" for the very first time.

He hypothesized that Pluto and Charon would be very similar. It would seem he was wrong.


Pluto has a face now. And a surprise: it also has a heart.
http://astronomynow.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/7-8-15_pluto_color_new_nasa-jhuapl-swri_797x550.jpg

I have waited 22 years for these images; our species has waited 85. Over the next four days there will be better and sharper images to come. Now at 38 years of age and with two scientific degrees to my name, I am more than merely "fascinated."

I am...
...awestruck.

This is why I science.
-Doc Lightning-

"The sky calls to us. If we do not destroy ourselves, we will one day venture to the stars."
-Carl Sagan
 
Pihero
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Fri Jul 10, 2015 9:48 am

Doc,
I move to make your above text "POST OF THE YEAR"

Thanks for your enthusiasm .

May you never grow old.
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zanl188
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Fri Jul 10, 2015 3:27 pm

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 108):

Born too late Doc... you missed the golden age.... Apollo. Viking. Ranger. Surveyor. Russian programs.
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GDB
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Fri Jul 10, 2015 6:27 pm

Could not put it better Doc.

The first one I really remember well was Viking.
Then the Voyagers (and a bit prior to them, the Pioneers but the Voyagers had the imaging to really strike awe).
How different each of the big four Moons were.

On to Saturn then the rest of the Voyager Grand Tour, leaving perhaps with Triton the last big surprise of that mission.
Because had not many of us prior to these probes, who had any kind of interest in the universe, seen so many artists impressions of these places, where all these Moons around the giant planets looked a lot like ours?
It was the sheer range and diversity of them, that some may well have life in under ice oceans is the icing on the cake.

Through it all there was by contrast still rather unknown Pluto, unknown expect for Charon in 1977, the only other discoveries that improved optics and other advances provided kept making Pluto smaller still.

For all that, though it clearly not a world you can bracket with either in the inner or outer planets, Pluto is something perhaps more, a major part of a whole region of the solar system that we have only be aware of for the past few decades.
And New Horizons is perhaps the most aptly named spacecraft yet as it is headed into the heart of this really rather unknown part of our system.
 
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DocLightning
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Sat Jul 11, 2015 3:13 am

Quoting ZANL188 (Reply 110):
Born too late Doc... you missed the golden age.... Apollo. Viking. Ranger. Surveyor. Russian programs.

I very much doubt that. I have seen all their discoveries...

...I suspect that before I reach the grave, I will see the first images of worlds orbiting other stars. I suspect I will see beneath the ice of Europa and I will see a better view of the surface of Venus. I suspect I will see the first footsteps on Mars and a return to the Moon. And with the advent of new ion drives for space probes, perhaps we will send another one to Pluto, or perhaps to Uranus or Neptune.

There are mysteries to unlock still. There's an entire cosmos of them.

In other news, I caught this image minutes after NASA released it, making me one of the first few percent of my species to see it:


http://www.nasa.gov/feature/new-image-of-pluto-houston-we-have-geology

NASA claims that they can now study the geology of Pluto. But actually, they are studying "hadeology." The study of planets is named after their Greek names, and Pluto's Greek name is Hades.

[Edited 2015-07-10 20:16:30]
-Doc Lightning-

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zanl188
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Sat Jul 11, 2015 8:48 am

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 112):
I very much doubt that. I have seen all their discoveries...

Better to have seen it as it happened... I feel fortunate in that regard...

Surface of Venus is ... difficult. Europa will be exciting.....
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nomadd22
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Sat Jul 11, 2015 12:38 pm

Seeing that little movie they made from Voyager 1's passage of Jupiter in 79 was one of the most remarkable moments in my life. Watching Jupiter spinning and the moons going round the planet was totally unexpected, since I'd figured it would just be a bunch of photos.
But, this is close. Waiting so long for the full dataset will be annoying, but I understand they had to get this bird launched and didn't have time to screw around with begging for a bigger launcher because of design creep. NH might have 10,000 times the data capability as Voyagers, but radio waves still work pretty much the same way.
Anon
 
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Sat Jul 11, 2015 7:18 pm

http://eyes.nasa.gov/

This is a little app you can download. I'll not go into details, but let's just say that I fell down this little rabbit hole for about 3 hours.
-Doc Lightning-

"The sky calls to us. If we do not destroy ourselves, we will one day venture to the stars."
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vikkyvik
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Sun Jul 12, 2015 2:33 am

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 108):
I am...
...awestruck.

This is why I science.

      

My dad was/is (sort of...he's retired) a space scientist. Among other things, he worked on tracking and cataloging orbital debris. Given his background, I've always been interested in space, and the many and varied objects to be found there.

(He was maybe a little perturbed when I majored in aeronautical engineering, rather than astronautical)

My interest had waned quite a bit into my 20s. But when I started doing some very amateur astrophotography a couple years ago, that interest picked back up big time.

Given that through image stacking, I've managed to show stars in my photos down to magnitude 15 or so, I'm hopeful to capture Pluto in one of them some day. It will just show up as a very very faint point of light, but I'll still be excited.

(for the Trekkies here, getting Wolf 359 to show up in an image is another of my astrophotography goals with my extremely limited equipment and skills)

I remember reading over and over some big Solar System photo-book when I was a kid. Of course, Pluto was just an artist impression. No longer!  
I'm watching Jeopardy. The category is worst Madonna songs. "This one from 1987 is terrible".
 
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Sun Jul 12, 2015 6:26 am

Quoting vikkyvik (Reply 116):


(for the Trekkies here, getting Wolf 359 to show up in an image is another of my astrophotography goals with my extremely limited equipment and skills)


If you see any large cubes near the star...

We're screwed.
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"The sky calls to us. If we do not destroy ourselves, we will one day venture to the stars."
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Stitch
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Sun Jul 12, 2015 12:32 pm

Quoting vikkyvik (Reply 116):
I remember reading over and over some big Solar System photo-book when I was a kid.

Perhaps the National Geographic Picture Atlas of Our Universe? I had that one, as well, and devoured it.

Quoting vikkyvik (Reply 116):
Of course, Pluto was just an artist impression. No longer!  

The first edition of that book was 1980 so Neptune and Uranus were effectively the same.  


Being in my mid-40s, I have been fortunate to have been "present" in one form or another for everything since Apollo 11 and I have to admit this mission ranks #4 on my interest list behind Voyager 2's fly-bys of Neptune and Uranus and Cassini's mission to Saturn.
 
vikkyvik
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Sun Jul 12, 2015 7:20 pm

Quoting Stitch (Reply 118):
Perhaps the National Geographic Picture Atlas of Our Universe? I had that one, as well, and devoured it.

Could have been. I don't remember.

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 117):
If you see any large cubes near the star...

We're screwed.

Yep.

Funny enough, it was only 20 years after first seeing that episode that I finally found out that Wolf 359 is an actual star.
I'm watching Jeopardy. The category is worst Madonna songs. "This one from 1987 is terrible".
 
jollo
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Sun Jul 12, 2015 11:03 pm

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 115):
http://eyes.nasa.gov/

This is a little app you can download. I'll not go into details, but let's just say that I fell down this little rabbit hole for about 3 hours.

Fascinating. Look at Hydra's orbit!

One of the couple billion things I don't understand about the details of the encounter sequence: I would have guessed that the last few hours leading to or immediately following fly-by would have been stricly split beetween gathering observations and sending back to Earth fail-safe data. Instead, there are a few instances when both the instrument cluster and the main comms dish seems to be purposefully pointed to... nowhere special. For example: from 08:22 am to 08:25 am, and from 01:53 pm to 01:59 pm.

Is there some secondary instrument, not shown in the Eyes animation, that will be having its prime time in these few minutes or what? Looking for rings? Other moons?

Thanks for any insight.
 
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Schweigend
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Mon Jul 13, 2015 1:44 am

The inveterate Cassini Probe (run by NASA/ESA), which has been in orbit around Saturn since 2004 and which continues to return fantastic science, will be helping New Horizons by sharing the Deep Space Network (DSN) and imaging the Pluto/Charon system right at the encounter.

Found today at the Cassini Solstice NASA website, in this week's Significant Events page:

Quote:
Cassini has good neighbors in space; neighbors who sometimes help one another in a friendly manner. Although there are many millions of kilometers between spacecraft, Cassini shares the same quadrant of sky, as seen from Earth, with Voyager 1, Voyager 2, Dawn the asteroid mission, and New Horizons, which is fast approaching the Pluto-Charon system. The latter is 3,900,000,000 kilometers away from Cassini, but close enough in Earth's two-dimensional sky that we often use the same complex of Deep Space Network (DSN) antennas at the same time. A few weeks ago New Horizons helped their Saturnian neighbor by giving Cassini several hours on "their" DSN station, while "our" station had to undergo urgent maintenance. On Tuesday this week (see below), Cassini's flight team reciprocated and approved commands that will have the spacecraft image Pluto one final time for the New Horizons mission.

While Cassini was encountering Titan, members of the flight team approved recently built commands for the ISS that will turn the spacecraft to track Pluto next week, and take a long-exposure image. This has been done several times in the past to assist New Horizons with optical navigation images. Given the speed of light and the immense distance to Pluto, the image will capture the Pluto-Charon system within several minutes of New Horizon's closest approach as it speeds past those distant bodies, and continues on its high-velocity journey deeper into the Kuiper Belt.

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/news/sign...tevents/significantevents20150709/

Quoting Stitch (Reply 118):
Being in my mid-40s, I have been fortunate to have been "present" in one form or another for everything since Apollo 11 and I have to admit this mission ranks #4 on my interest list behind Voyager 2's fly-bys of Neptune and Uranus and Cassini's mission to Saturn.

The Pioneers visiting Jupiter in 1973-4 were big for me, as were the Voyager 1-2 visits to Jupiter and Saturn in 1979-1981. Viking to Mars in '76 was, sorry to say, nice but kind of "meh". Uranus in 1985 disappointed with its blandness, but that was compensated for by the thrill of Miranda. And finally, Voyager 2's visit to Neptune in 1989 (that gloomy, huge dark blue thing at the very edge of our ken with its thrilling moon Triton), was the big payoff! I've followed every probe or orbital observatory with fascination...via magazines, journals, books, and now the internet!

How unique and wondrous this period of observation and discovery we are living in has been!

Not unlike when "New Worlds" were being discovered and explored here on Earth five hundred years ago by intrepid mariners.
 
nomadd22
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Mon Jul 13, 2015 2:54 am

Quoting nomadd22 (Reply 90):
Quoting TheSonntag (Reply 89):

Thanks. Do you know how long the energy will last to keep contact with NH?

NH has a smaller dish than the Voyagers, but, I assume a better receiver, and the DSN is improving all the time. I imagine they'll still be talking when it's 40 years old. NH also has better thermal couplings in the RTG, which was the problem that caused power degradation in the older models, so power shouldn't be an issue.

A little further digging makes it look like I was wrong. One of the restrictions for New Horizons post Pluto target is that it be no more than 55AU, a little more than 5 billion miles out because of communications range, or less than half the present distance of Voyager 1.

If you'd like to see an excellent article covering New Horizons and it's history, check out Chris Gebhardt's over at NSF.
http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2015/...s-pluto-historic-kuiper-encounter/
Anon
 
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ssteve
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Mon Jul 13, 2015 3:34 am

Quoting jollo (Reply 120):
Instead, there are a few instances when both the instrument cluster and the main comms dish seems to be purposefully pointed to... nowhere special. For example: from 08:22 am to 08:25 am, and from 01:53 pm to 01:59 pm.

You could ask at unmannedspaceflight.com -- great forum for this sort of question.

I suspect without investigating too much that it's either PEPSSI imaging or imaging of a star through areas they expect to see atmosphere or dust. (Planned occultations)
 
rwessel
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Mon Jul 13, 2015 5:33 am

Quoting nomadd22 (Reply 122):
A little further digging makes it look like I was wrong. One of the restrictions for New Horizons post Pluto target is that it be no more than 55AU, a little more than 5 billion miles out because of communications range, or less than half the present distance of Voyager 1.

The general expectation is the NH will be operational long past that point, although having to run at reduced data rates and power levels, much like the Voyagers. I don’t believe any mission funding for anything much past the KBO flyby has been approved (so at least officially, the mission ends at that point – although we all expect funding to be approved if the spacecraft remains in good condition).

edit: Actually I don't think that even the KBO flyby is actually funded yet - that decision should be made early next year (yes, that's after the planned course adjustment to whichever KBO target ends up selected - mostly likely PT1, at this point).

[Edited 2015-07-12 22:36:53]
 
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KarelXWB
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Mon Jul 13, 2015 8:33 am

What we leave behind is not as important as how we've lived.
 
canoecarrier
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Mon Jul 13, 2015 4:37 pm

I watched the NASA briefing this morning. Pretty amazing the number of observations they are going to squeeze in during the flyby tomorrow morning. Hopefully they'll get funding for the 2019 KBU flyby and we can have this whole discussion again in a few years.
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canoecarrier
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Mon Jul 13, 2015 7:29 pm

The observation schedule has a nice interactive guide to what they'll be imaging, when and how detailed the pictures are going to be.

http://utprosim.com/newhorizons/index.html

I can't wait. Some of the moons will be imaged at well under 1km/pixel.
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DocLightning
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Mon Jul 13, 2015 9:42 pm

Quoting UA444 (Reply 52):
Can't wait to finally see our 9th planet up close.

And...

Quoting KarelXWB (Reply 125):
We have additional photos:

Amazing. Looking back at this thread across almost a decade of time. I can't believe it's here. And I can't wait to see the images and the data that come with them.
-Doc Lightning-

"The sky calls to us. If we do not destroy ourselves, we will one day venture to the stars."
-Carl Sagan
 
canoecarrier
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Mon Jul 13, 2015 10:55 pm

Quoting DocLightning (Reply 1):
Amazing. Looking back at this thread across almost a decade of time. I can't believe it's here. And I can't wait to see the images and the data that come with them. 

We'll have to be patient. I heard given the distance from Earth and how the spacecraft is configured (it has to stop science observations in order to turn and send back data) we'll only get 14 images in the first week following closest approach. But what amazing photos they will be.
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Mon Jul 13, 2015 11:04 pm

Quoting canoecarrier (Reply 129):
We'll have to be patient. I heard given the distance from Earth and how the spacecraft is configured (it has to stop science observations in order to turn and send back data) we'll only get 14 images in the first week following closest approach. But what amazing photos they will be.
-Doc Lightning-

"The sky calls to us. If we do not destroy ourselves, we will one day venture to the stars."
-Carl Sagan
 
nomadd22
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Tue Jul 14, 2015 12:32 am

Quoting rwessel (Reply 124):

The general expectation is the NH will be operational long past that point, although having to run at reduced data rates and power levels, much like the Voyagers.

I'm trying to dig into this now. All I have so far is that, at great distance, both NH and Voyager will run about 8.4Ghz at 12 W, since Voyager's transmitter is permanently set at low power. Voyager has around a 5db advantage because of it's 3.7M dish. NH will have a 50% data rate advantage because of better error correction protocol, which should be a range advantage. You'd be surprised how much data an old timer can pack into 10bps when he doesn't have to worry about video or needing 28,000 lines of code to turn on a light bulb.
Anyhow, the signal from New Horizons should be detectable with Today's DSN out to 120 AU or so at a very low data rate. But, since it won't be that far for 30 years, the DSN could be greatly improved by then through better receivers and combination of signals from different parts of the planet, which they're already doing to an extent.
Power levels should be a smaller factor in the long run for NH, since they'll decay slower than Voyager's. Better thermocouples in the RTGs.

Or, they'll have fusion based plasma drives in 30 years and both spacecraft will be back home in museums.
Anon
 
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KarelXWB
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Tue Jul 14, 2015 7:51 am

Only 4 hours left.

We should receive the highest resolution photo of Pluto on July 15, followed by the highest resolution photo of Charon. Then the spacecraft will start sending all the remaining data back to Earth, which will take up to 26 months.

Meanwhile New Horizons has answered one of the most basic questions about Pluto: its size.

http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/News-Article.php?page=20150713

Quote:
Mission scientists have found Pluto to be 1,473 miles (2,370 kilometers) in diameter, somewhat larger than many prior estimates. Images acquired with the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) were used to make this determination. This result confirms what was already suspected: Pluto is larger than all other known solar system objects beyond the orbit of Neptune.

“The size of Pluto has been debated since its discovery in 1930. We are excited to finally lay this question to rest,” said mission scientist Bill McKinnon, Washington University, St. Louis.

Pluto’s newly estimated size means that its density is slightly lower than previously thought, and the fraction of ice in its interior is slightly higher. Also, the lowest layer of Pluto’s atmosphere, called the troposphere, is shallower than previously believed.

Measuring Pluto’s size has been a decades-long challenge due to complicating factors from its atmosphere. Its largest moon Charon lacks a substantial atmosphere, and its diameter was easier to determine using ground-based telescopes. New Horizons observations of Charon confirm previous estimates of 751 miles (1208 km) kilometers) across.

http://pbs.twimg.com/media/CJ0DvDMW8AA04kf.jpg:large
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tommy1808
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Tue Jul 14, 2015 9:40 am

Quoting TheSonntag (Reply 86):
New Horizons
Quoting UA444 (Reply 52):
Can't wait to finally see our 9th planet

Planet?

Quoting KarelXWB (Reply 132):
Only 4 hours left.

I don't think I have been this excited about something space related since I saw space shuttle STS-61-A, Germanys first manned space mission, launch. Due to the sun, it was visible from Germany.

Best regards Thomas
This Singature is a safe space......
 
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KarelXWB
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Tue Jul 14, 2015 11:23 am

Less than 30 minutes left.

Meanwhile NASA just released this photo, taken at a distance of 766.000 km:


https://instagram.com/p/5HTXKMoaFL/
What we leave behind is not as important as how we've lived.
 
canoecarrier
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Tue Jul 14, 2015 12:48 pm

Karel in the press conference that's on now they said we could expect even higher resolution photos over time. I'm sure you know this already but they are sending the compressed data first in order to have it safely here then sending uncompressed data later.

4k bits/sec data rate....
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Tue Jul 14, 2015 2:33 pm

Quoting KarelXWB (Reply 134):
Meanwhile NASA just released this photo, taken at a distance of 766.000 km:

Absolutely stunning! This is exactly what makes science so awesome. I can't wait to see more pictures as they come in tomorrow.
DH8A DH8B CR1 CR2 CR7 CR9 E45 E70 E75 E90 D93 M88 319 320 321 333 343 712 732 733 734 73G 738 739 744 752 753 762 763 77L 77W
 
UA444
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Tue Jul 14, 2015 2:59 pm

Quoting tommy1808 (Reply 133):

Yes, planet.


Beautiful pictures. Finally glad we have completed the reconnaissance of the solar system, 50 years after Mariner 4 at Mars.

[Edited 2015-07-14 08:55:32]
 
TheSonntag
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Tue Jul 14, 2015 3:49 pm

Quoting KarelXWB (Reply 134):
Meanwhile NASA just released this photo, taken at a distance of 766.000 km:

Is this original colour? Looks like Mars.
 
canoecarrier
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Tue Jul 14, 2015 7:51 pm

Quoting TheSonntag (Reply 138):
Is this original colour? Looks like Mars.

That's a true color photo. I read an interview with some of the project scientists that they had anticipated for some time it was copper colored based on photometric color measurements. Pretty astounding.
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KarelXWB
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Tue Jul 14, 2015 10:12 pm

What we leave behind is not as important as how we've lived.
 
prebennorholm
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Wed Jul 15, 2015 2:08 am

Quoting UA444 (Reply 137):
Yes, planet.

Astronomy is a wonderfully conservative science. When a faulty assumption is corrected, it can take ages to have the correction accepted.

In some cultures it took a couple of thousand years before Pythagoras' theory, that the Earth isn't flat, was accepted.

There is, however, progress in modern time. Nobody gets arrested these days for insisting that Pluto (and the other Kuiper Belt Objects) are named Dwarf Planets or KBOs, unlike 400 years ago when Galileo Galilei insisted that the Sun (not the Earth) was in the center.

Anyway, if it takes another hundred years to accept that Pluto, Sedna, Eris, Haumea, Orcus etc. are not planets, so be it, fine with me.  

Interesting to notice that Pluto regained the title as largest dwarf planet. Due to its atmosphere the timings of star occultations were not accurate, and for a decade Eris held the title. Now Eris is 2% smaller than Pluto, but still 27% more massive. Eris' diameter is pretty accurately measured to 2326 km since it has no atmosphere. The orbit of its moon, Dysnomia, has long time ago given the exact mass.
Always keep your number of landings equal to your number of take-offs
 
UA444
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Wed Jul 15, 2015 5:47 am

Quoting prebennorholm (Reply 141):

Only faulty assumption is from those like you who say Pluto isn't a planet. They are wrong and their faulty logic, minority decision will be corrected in due time. More astronomers reject the IAU and their moronic "definition" than those who hijacked the vote to draft it. Whoops.

Atmosphere, dynamic interior, 5 moons, weather, complex geology. More similar to Earth than Earth is to Jupiter. Planet Pluto. 9th rock from the sun. Glad to finally meet you after 85 years.

[Edited 2015-07-14 22:48:30]

[Edited 2015-07-14 22:50:17]

[Edited 2015-07-14 22:51:47]

[Edited 2015-07-14 23:10:24]
 
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KarelXWB
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Wed Jul 15, 2015 8:26 am

The New Horizons spacecraft survived the encounter.

http://www.nasa.gov/press-release/na...phones-home-safe-after-pluto-flyby

Quote:

The call everyone was waiting for is in. NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft phoned home just before 9 p.m. EDT Tuesday to tell the mission team and the world it had accomplished the historic first-ever flyby of Pluto.

The preprogrammed “phone call” -- a 15-minute series of status messages beamed back to mission operations at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Maryland through NASA’s Deep Space Network -- ended a very suspenseful 21-hour waiting period. New Horizons had been instructed to spend the day gathering the maximum amount of data, and not communicating with Earth until it was beyond the Pluto system.
What we leave behind is not as important as how we've lived.
 
TheSonntag
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Wed Jul 15, 2015 9:35 am

Cannot wait to see the final pictures in the highest possible resolution. Waiting till September is not so bad. It is so impressive to see how this machine worked as planned.

How is "obsolescence management" working on space probes, btw? NH is "only" 9 years old, but we still receive data from the 1970s era Voyagers today. Obviously there must be some people around who still understand how the system works. I doubt people work on one project for 40 years, so how is this done?
 
tommy1808
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Wed Jul 15, 2015 9:44 am

Quoting UA444 (Reply 142):
Atmosphere, dynamic interior, 5 moons, weather, complex geology. More similar to Earth than Earth is to Jupiter.

It is also sufficiently different from planets and if Pluto would be one, the number of planets would explode.

Quoting UA444 (Reply 142):
Only faulty assumption is from those like you who say Pluto isn't a planet. They are wrong and their faulty logic, minority decision will be corrected in due time.

Actually the error of Pluto being a planet was corrected in that kind of grass roots movement, museums started the trend long before the IUA made a definition of planet.
Soter's planetary discriminant and Stern–Levison parameter make for perfectly logical parameters.

Quoting UA444 (Reply 142):
More astronomers reject the IAU and their moronic "definition" than those who hijacked the vote to draft it.

I have seen lots of astronomers criticizing the wording of the definition and other formal criticism, but not so much in the way of "any definition of planet has to make pluto a planet".
Got a link?

Best regards
Thomas
This Singature is a safe space......
 
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KarelXWB
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Wed Jul 15, 2015 10:22 am

Problem is, if we call Pluto a planet, Eris and other similar objects would be planets too. Then our solar system would have 30, 40, 50 or perhaps even 1,000 planets.
What we leave behind is not as important as how we've lived.
 
nomadd22
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Wed Jul 15, 2015 1:26 pm

Quoting KarelXWB (Reply 146):
Problem is, if we call Pluto a planet, Eris and other similar objects would be planets too. Then our solar system would have 30, 40, 50 or perhaps even 1,000 planets.

Imagine trying to come up with a 200 planet mnemonic.
Anon
 
UA444
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Wed Jul 15, 2015 3:04 pm

Quoting KarelXWB (Reply 146):

Guess we should limit the number of countries there are then, kids can't remember them all. Trying to limit the number artificially isn't science and is downright stupid. The "we'll have 1000 planets" rhetoric is hyperbole. It would be 15 or 20 max. Pluto is a planet and so are the rest. If an object the size of Mars or Mercury is found in the Kuiper Belt, it would be called a dwarf planet because the IAU's definition is terrible. That would make no sense and makes them look like bigger idiots than they already are.

Quoting tommy1808 (Reply 145):

Petition has been online from a week after the definition was made in 2006. Close to 400 signed it, more than those who voted in Prague. Feel free to google. And there are several high profile astronomers who have talked about ignoring it and over turning it.
The Stern-Levinson proposal counts Pluto as a planet, he coined the term dwarf planet except in this case it literally means small planet, rather than the idiotic "not a planet" IAU meaning and Alan Stern is the IAU's biggest critic and flat out refers to it as a planet full stop. So did NASA administrator Charles Bolden just yesterday in press conferences.


And no museums I went to listed it as anything but a planet until 2006. Some ignore it even today, because they, like most of the world, know Pluto is a planet.

[Edited 2015-07-15 08:06:38]

[Edited 2015-07-15 08:12:12]
 
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Stitch
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Official New Horizons Discussion Thread Part 1

Wed Jul 15, 2015 3:58 pm

Quoting UA444 (Reply 148):
If an object the size of Mars or Mercury is found in the Kuiper Belt, it would be called a dwarf planet because the IAU's definition is terrible.

If there was an object the size of Mars in the Kuiper Belt, the arrangement of the composition of the Kuiper Belt would be different as it would have exerted sufficient gravity to have cleared its neighbouring region of planetesimals.


If we give any trans-Neptunian object the nomenclature of planet, it should be 136199 Eris since it is about as large as Pluto, a fair bit more massive than Pluto and unlike Pluto, the barycenter of it's orbit with it's (primary) moon is within the Eris itself.

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