Ozair
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Tue May 14, 2019 12:45 am

flyingturtle wrote:
In the very early hours of May 16th (GMT time), SpaceX will launch sixty Starlink communication satellites at once.

Whew.

And so it begins...

Have SpaceX indicated the launch frequency yet and this launch will have 60 satellites but given the intent is approx 12000 how many do you think they will be able to loft in a single launch?
 
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Nomadd
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Tue May 14, 2019 11:09 am

Ozair wrote:
flyingturtle wrote:
In the very early hours of May 16th (GMT time), SpaceX will launch sixty Starlink communication satellites at once.

Whew.

And so it begins...

Have SpaceX indicated the launch frequency yet and this launch will have 60 satellites but given the intent is approx 12000 how many do you think they will be able to loft in a single launch?

Hard to say. Higher sats might need to be bigger, higher sats might need a Falcon Heavy, since this payload is maxing out the F9, the Starship will be operational who knows when, SpaceX has how many more tricks up their sleeve???...Lots of guessing going on.
People were surprised to hear they might launch 24 sats at once. 60 is crazy.
 
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flyingturtle
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Tue May 14, 2019 10:33 pm

Ozair wrote:
the intent is approx 12000


In 2018, 4857 satellites were orbiting the earth, of which 1980 were active.

In 2019, SpaceX intends to launch four rokkits with Starlink satellites. So, an initial constellation of 180 satellites, which neatly compares to... well, the line above.


David
Reading accident reports is what calms me down
 
Ozair
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Wed May 15, 2019 12:24 am

flyingturtle wrote:
Ozair wrote:
the intent is approx 12000


In 2018, 4857 satellites were orbiting the earth, of which 1980 were active.

In 2019, SpaceX intends to launch four rokkits with Starlink satellites. So, an initial constellation of 180 satellites, which neatly compares to... well, the line above.


David

That is 2019 but SpaceX has made it clear the minimum constellation they need for “spotty service” is 800 and still have plans for that 12000 to provide coverage at the desired capability.

The launch will consist of the first 60 Starlink satellites, which appear to be experimental. SpaceX CEO Elon Musk tweeted that “much will likely go wrong on 1st mission. Also, 6 more launches of 60 sats needed for minor coverage, 12 for moderate.” The 60 satellites will join a couple of prototypes satellites called Tintin, which launched in 2018.
“This next batch of satellites will really be a demonstration set for us to see the deployment scheme and start putting our network together,” said SpaceX’s president and chief operating officer, Gwynne Shotwell, on May 7 at the Satellite 2019 conference, reports spacenews.com. “We start launching satellites for actual service later this year.”


At least a couple of years. According to Shotwell, there will be two more launches in 2019, possibly as many as six, though that depends on whether the initial 60 check-out. SpaceX needs about 800 up there to begin a spotty service, which it wants to happen by 2021, though the journey to having 12,000 up there could be a long one.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/jamiecarte ... 56ae165641

So compared to the 1980 operating satellites in 2018 by the end of 2021 the additions by SpaceX, and a few others, will likely take that total above 3000… a 50% increase in 3 years.

At 60 sats a launch that is 14 launches, plus a couple of extras being done today for the test system being launched shortly.
 
ZaphodHarkonnen
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Wed May 15, 2019 1:35 am

For the moment the record still belongs to the ISRO with something like 104 satellites in one launch. The increase of planned stuff in LEO is pretty crazy. O_O
 
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flyingturtle
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Wed May 15, 2019 12:23 pm

ZaphodHarkonnen wrote:
For the moment the record still belongs to the ISRO with something like 104 satellites in one launch. The increase of planned stuff in LEO is pretty crazy. O_O


https://spaceflight101.com/pslv-c37/psl ... h-success/ has nice images of a 88-satellite rack. I hope at least one of them was a SafetySat.


David
Reading accident reports is what calms me down
 
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casinterest
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Thu May 16, 2019 1:35 am

Spacex Starlink feed will go live at 02:15 UTC

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rT366GiQkP0

They are going to launch stacked satellites for internet coverage over rural areas over the next few years . This is the first mission.
Where ever you go, there you are.
 
jonnyclam123
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Thu May 16, 2019 12:55 pm

Starlink launch now scheduled at 10:30 PM EDT tonight.
 
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flyingturtle
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Thu May 16, 2019 4:59 pm

Today's launch was scrubbed because of high wind speeds in the upper atmosphere.

Why is this a matter? The F9 comes roaring through the air at a much higher speed... :scratchchin:
Reading accident reports is what calms me down
 
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flyingturtle
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Fri May 17, 2019 10:34 am

Scrubbed because of winds in the upper atmosphere.
Then, scrubbed again because SpaceX wants to update the satellite software.

Those damn Windows updates always come at the worst possible time...
Reading accident reports is what calms me down
 
DarkKnight5
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Fri May 17, 2019 4:36 pm

flyingturtle wrote:
Scrubbed because of winds in the upper atmosphere.
Then, scrubbed again because SpaceX wants to update the satellite software.

Those damn Windows updates always come at the worst possible time...

Wonder how long it’s going to take Nick Burns to install updates on 60 sats.
 
jonnyclam123
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Wed May 22, 2019 1:02 pm

Now scheduled for the 24th at 10:30 PM again.
 
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Francoflier
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Fri May 24, 2019 6:12 am

Another successful mission.

The booster was also successfully recovered on OCISLY, which was its 3rd landing.

The satellite deployment was interesting and not quite what I expected. The cluster was released in one step. There was no deployment mechanism, the satellites were simply all 'dumped' and slowly separated from each other in a random fashion.
I suppose they will wait for them to be sufficiently far from each other and slowly bring them to their precise respective orbit?
I'll do my own airline. With Blackjack. And hookers. In fact, forget the airline.
 
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william
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Fri May 24, 2019 3:07 pm

Apparently all 60 satellites have phoned home and are working. I thought it was interesting how the satellites are designed at end of life to initiate a burn that will send it into earth's atmosphere, and is designed to disintegrate into 95% dust in the atmosphere. Speaking of Space Junk, the satellites are linked to a military database and is aware of space junk around and will move out of the way so as not to collide with it. A lot of common sense stuff that makes one wander why it took so long for some else to think about it.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=riBaVeDTEWI
 
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william
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Fri May 24, 2019 3:24 pm

https://www.starlink.com/

Starlink website up. Smart how they figured out how not to add to the space junk problem.
 
mxaxai
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Fri May 24, 2019 7:04 pm

william wrote:
A lot of common sense stuff that makes one wander why it took so long for some else to think about it.

Because it adds weight and cost to the satellite. They probably did it because they otherwise wouldn't get the permits without a good plan for end of life disposal. 60 satellites is almost as large as the entire Iridium constellation.
 
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william
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Sat May 25, 2019 5:59 pm

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ytUygPqjXEc

How odd, was this through a telescope or naked eye? Will the satelltes pop up on my Skyview app?
 
DarkKnight5
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Sun May 26, 2019 2:56 pm

william wrote:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ytUygPqjXEc

How odd, was this through a telescope or naked eye? Will the satelltes pop up on my Skyview app?

I’m guessing it was made with a camera with a lense, which is sort of a telescope when you think about it.
 
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Stitch
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Wed Jun 12, 2019 11:03 pm

Vandenberg was socked-in with fog today which added some visual interest to the RADARSAT Constellation Mission launch and recovery footage.
 
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Francoflier
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Thu Jun 13, 2019 2:48 am

Sure did. The shot where we see it punching out of and sinking back into the fog layer are quite amazing.

Second flight and landing for that booster, which is the one which launched the Crew Dragon Demo-1 mission in March.
I'll do my own airline. With Blackjack. And hookers. In fact, forget the airline.
 
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flyingturtle
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Tue Jun 25, 2019 6:43 am

Core booster seems to have missed the boat... went for a drink.

Everything else looks OK.
Reading accident reports is what calms me down
 
MatthewDB
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Tue Jun 25, 2019 6:47 am

flyingturtle wrote:
Core booster seems to have missed the boat... went for a drink.

Everything else looks OK.


I loved the crowd reaction. Dang... wait, we didn't have high hopes on this one so whooo hooo.

I'm hoping that we're going to get some good videos of the night double landing. This should be a good comparison to the two daytime double landings.
 
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Francoflier
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Tue Jun 25, 2019 8:05 am

Ouch. That's 1 for 3 on center core landings and 0 for 3 on overall recovery... (That last landing was particularly tricky anyway, they probably didn't have high hopes).

Oh well, no one said it was going to be easy.

At least they nailed fairing recovery this time.

Otherwise, another successful mission.
I'll do my own airline. With Blackjack. And hookers. In fact, forget the airline.
 
LightningZ71
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Tue Jun 25, 2019 5:38 pm

Musk was fairly up front about the low likelihood of recovering the center core. The Max Q timing on this launch was rather extreme, and, as he said, it would be coming in quite hot. It was still extremely close as these things go.
 
aviationaware
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Wed Jun 26, 2019 1:44 am

Considering how close it was to the boat it looks like a single engine went out a single digit amount of seconds too early. So by any measure that's incredibly close.
 
ZaphodHarkonnen
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Wed Jun 26, 2019 2:00 am

aviationaware wrote:
Considering how close it was to the boat it looks like a single engine went out a single digit amount of seconds too early. So by any measure that's incredibly close.


Just like when they were first attempting to just catch the first core out at sea. Even getting close enough to see it splash is an amazing achievement. The sheer science and engineering team effort to just do that is impressive. Think back to the days of early ballistic missiles where being within a mile of what you were aiming at was a win. And for that you didn't even need it working after use. :P It's just a matter of time until they can recover such a high energy return.

And don't forget they managed to catch the centre core on their first attempt. It was the ocean state after that resulted in the booster loss.
 
GST
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Wed Jun 26, 2019 6:44 am

aviationaware wrote:
Considering how close it was to the boat it looks like a single engine went out a single digit amount of seconds too early. So by any measure that's incredibly close.


I wonder if this is one of their less preferred failure types. The descent profile has the booster aiming for a spot some way from the intended landing spot (be it the barge or a landing pad - in the latter case the aim point is out to sea a bit) for the majority of the approach, before adjusting the trajectory in the very final descent phase to aiming for the actual landing spot. Therefore for most of the descent, a failure would result in the booster impacting a spot where it can do no harm to people, equipment, or infrastructure. But if a failure occurs once the final trajectory correction is under way or complete, there is a very high risk of a fireball somewhere you actually care about and having a hefty repair bill (like the times when they had a fireball actually on the droneship).

What I think would be really cool, is if what we saw yesterday turned out to be an actual programmed last-moment abort routine - the rocket has determined in the very final descent that for some reason it can no longer land on the barge, so shut down one side engine and max thrust the other side to get the rocket to crash some way abeam.
 
ZaphodHarkonnen
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Wed Jun 26, 2019 11:42 am

GST wrote:
aviationaware wrote:
Considering how close it was to the boat it looks like a single engine went out a single digit amount of seconds too early. So by any measure that's incredibly close.


I wonder if this is one of their less preferred failure types. The descent profile has the booster aiming for a spot some way from the intended landing spot (be it the barge or a landing pad - in the latter case the aim point is out to sea a bit) for the majority of the approach, before adjusting the trajectory in the very final descent phase to aiming for the actual landing spot. Therefore for most of the descent, a failure would result in the booster impacting a spot where it can do no harm to people, equipment, or infrastructure. But if a failure occurs once the final trajectory correction is under way or complete, there is a very high risk of a fireball somewhere you actually care about and having a hefty repair bill (like the times when they had a fireball actually on the droneship).

What I think would be really cool, is if what we saw yesterday turned out to be an actual programmed last-moment abort routine - the rocket has determined in the very final descent that for some reason it can no longer land on the barge, so shut down one side engine and max thrust the other side to get the rocket to crash some way abeam.


I'd be surprised if that were the case. Even when done right the term you'll often here used is a hover-slam. As that's exactly what it is. It's still a big hit and arguably dicey when everything works as intended. Hence why the pads are well clear of anyone. Remember one of the earlier landings had one of the legs use all of the energy absorbing crush blocks in one of the legs. Another term that's used to describe the move is a suicide burn. If it doesn't go off perfectly it goes boom.

I expect SpaceX will mention why it didn't work at some point. Quite probably an engine running out of fuel or failing to relight. As you mention, the move to aim at the pad directly happens at the very last moment. The very last moment.
 
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william
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Wed Jun 26, 2019 4:40 pm

https://www.teslarati.com/spacex-ceo-el ... d-landing/

Good explanation why retrieving the center section was going to be dicey. It was falling, and falling fast!
 
Armadillo1
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Re: SpaceX - Tests, Launches, Developments

Tue Jul 09, 2019 7:29 pm

Is there topic about space junk? I think baloon (parachute/air brake) will be nice for any size satellite

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