Page 3 of 3

Re: United Launch Alliance - Tests, Launches, News, Developments

Posted: Sat Mar 07, 2020 3:49 am
by ZaphodHarkonnen
Oof. What, a, clusterf**k. (Mods don't like even that swearing. :P )

And to remember that Boeing was supposed to be the reliable pair of hands compared to the brash risky young kids at SpaceX.

On the upside for ULA, they might get another Atlas V launch out of this mess.

Re: United Launch Alliance - Tests, Launches, News, Developments

Posted: Sat Mar 07, 2020 3:57 am
by Francoflier
Tugger wrote:

Also Boeing has set aside/took a charge of $410M to cover a potential second full-up test launch if required.

Tugg


If I was an astronaut slated to fly this thing, I certainly would want them to... I hope NASA makes them do another test, though I suspect Boeing's lobbyist are working against that already in DC.

Re: United Launch Alliance - Tests, Launches, News, Developments

Posted: Sat Mar 07, 2020 5:58 am
by DarkKnight5
Francoflier wrote:
Tugger wrote:

Also Boeing has set aside/took a charge of $410M to cover a potential second full-up test launch if required.

Tugg


If I was an astronaut slated to fly this thing, I certainly would want them to... I hope NASA makes them do another test, though I suspect Boeing's lobbyist are working against that already in DC.


Since they’ve already charged the money I assume an OFT repeat is a foregone conclusion, which makes me think NASA has made it clear to Boeing OFT2 is happening. Now I agree the lobbyists are hard at work which is why NASA has been so kid-gloved since the first breath of an error, but they’re going to fly another OFT unmanned.

Re: United Launch Alliance - Tests, Launches, News, Developments

Posted: Sat Mar 07, 2020 7:11 pm
by AirlineCritic
No full, entire-mission test performed? That is shocking if true. And very unprofessional.

Re: United Launch Alliance - Tests, Launches, News, Developments

Posted: Thu Mar 12, 2020 6:47 am
by hilram
Tugger wrote:
Apparently NASA has 61 items for Boeing to address:
https://www.cnbc.com/2020/03/06/nasa-fi ... craft.html

Also Boeing has set aside/took a charge of $410M to cover a potential second full-up test launch if required.

Tugg

How the mighty have fallen!

What happended to Test Methodology at Boeing?

Re: United Launch Alliance - Tests, Launches, News, Developments

Posted: Fri Mar 27, 2020 4:01 pm
by Tugger
Well, some goods news: The AEHF 6 satellite launch yesterday was successful and the US Space Force has opened for business! :spin:
https://videos.space.com/m/1my8wsAQ/bla ... t=9wzCTV4g

Nice launch.

Tugg

Re: United Launch Alliance - Tests, Launches, News, Developments

Posted: Mon Apr 06, 2020 11:31 pm
by zanl188

Re: United Launch Alliance - Tests, Launches, News, Developments

Posted: Tue Apr 07, 2020 10:15 am
by Francoflier
zanl188 wrote:


'Opts'...

:wink2:

Re: United Launch Alliance - Tests, Launches, News, Developments

Posted: Thu Apr 09, 2020 2:37 am
by DarkKnight5
Francoflier wrote:
zanl188 wrote:


'Opts'...

:wink2:

We’ve “opted” to “meet our contractual obligations” and avoid a “devastating” “contractor performance review”.
Image

Also we need a “bailout.”
Image

Re: United Launch Alliance - Tests, Launches, News, Developments

Posted: Sun May 17, 2020 8:02 pm
by DarkKnight5
Atlas V launched US Air or Space Force’s X-37B spaceplane. Can’t confirm the prograM has been transferred to the Space Force officially or not. Media outlets divided in that point.

Errrrrday’s coverage here:
http://youtu.be/NIfyAd06lII

It is amazing how slowly it left the pad. It had to have been at 1.1x thrust to weight at liftoff. It looked so slow I was worried the engine wasn’t providing full power. It was also one of the most vertical launches I’ve seen lately, very little pitch over, it’s especially apparent on views from the rocket. Obviously they didn’t need it, but it seems like an SRM would have helped their performance margin. Maybe the X-37B has so much Delta-V that it doesn’t need any help beyond getting to LEO.

Re: United Launch Alliance - Tests, Launches, News, Developments

Posted: Mon May 18, 2020 3:46 am
by Francoflier
DarkKnight5 wrote:
Atlas V launched US Air or Space Force’s X-37B spaceplane. Can’t confirm the prograM has been transferred to the Space Force officially or not. Media outlets divided in that point.

Errrrrday’s coverage here:
http://youtu.be/NIfyAd06lII

It is amazing how slowly it left the pad. It had to have been at 1.1x thrust to weight at liftoff. It looked so slow I was worried the engine wasn’t providing full power. It was also one of the most vertical launches I’ve seen lately, very little pitch over, it’s especially apparent on views from the rocket. Obviously they didn’t need it, but it seems like an SRM would have helped their performance margin. Maybe the X-37B has so much Delta-V that it doesn’t need any help beyond getting to LEO.


ULA is really good at those uncommon / specialized launches with unusual orbits and payloads. I think this is an area where SpaceX can't really compete with them (yet).

I still find it funny that a US Space Force mission is being put into orbit by a Soviet-era engine, even though its days are counted.

Re: United Launch Alliance - Tests, Launches, News, Developments

Posted: Mon May 18, 2020 5:38 am
by Nomadd
I have to wonder if Tim Dodd is human. I've seen him talk for two hours without taking a breath.

Re: United Launch Alliance - Tests, Launches, News, Developments

Posted: Mon May 18, 2020 12:03 pm
by DarkKnight5
Nomadd wrote:
I have to wonder if Tim Dodd is human. I've seen him talk for two hours without taking a breath.

Each time is see one of his launch live-streams check in at 4+ hours I ask myself “isn’t he married?”.

Re: United Launch Alliance - Tests, Launches, News, Developments

Posted: Wed Jul 08, 2020 1:54 am
by ThePointblank
Independent review of Boeing's Starliner complete, with a total of 80 recommendations:

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/nasa-and-b ... t-reviews/

21 of these recommendations pertain to improving testing and ground simulations, including the notable addition of an end-to-end test prior to every Starliner flight;
10 recommendations involve assessing software requirements to ensure the spacecraft is sufficiently tested to meet them;
35 recommendations call for process and operational improvements, including an increased number of participants in reviews;
and 7 recommendations or updates to the spacecraft’s software in order to correct the MET, service module disposal, and communications link anomalies, and to add a new radio frequency filter to narrow the range of communications frequencies Starliner receives and prevent interference

Finally, there were 6 more recommendations for NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate to incorporate into future programs:

Require that the systems engineering management plan delivered by each contractor contain specific requirements related to the contractor’s management approach.
Ensure that NASA reviews and approves the contractor’s hazard verification test plans prior to test execution.
Ensure NASA independent validation and verification (IV&V) teams provide insight to contractor IV&V agents.
Implement an approach that ensures alternate standards are reviewed and approved prior to beginning development work.
Develop a best practices document for use by future programs that implement the shared accountability model used in NASA’s Commercial Crew Program.
Evaluate Boeing’s actions developed by the joint independent review team for applicability post-certification.