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Zkpilot
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RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Mon Jun 10, 2019 10:41 pm

https://i.stuff.co.nz/national/politics ... and-drones

5x C130J to go with 4x P-8 and a blueprint for other purchases.
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ZaphodHarkonnen
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Mon Jun 10, 2019 11:31 pm

The Stuff article is wrong. The press release from MoD says no numbers have been decided on or contract signed.

Just that the C-130J-30 is the preferred option and they're going through the work with the US FMS now.

https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/sup ... red-option
11 June 2019
Super Hercules selected as preferred option

Ron Mark
Hon Ron Mark

Defence

Defence Minister Ron Mark has announced the selection of the C-130J-30 Super Hercules as the preferred option for the replacement of the aging C-130H aircraft.

The replacement of the five Hercules transport aircraft is the highest priority project within the Coalition Government’s Defence Capability Plan 2019.

Cabinet has decided to seek detailed costing information for a replacement aircraft, the C-130J-30 Super Hercules.

“The current Hercules have served us well since the 1960s, but they have reached the end of the road, and suitable and proven replacement aircraft will need to be sourced,” says Ron Mark. ”The current fleet is increasing in cost to maintain, and is taking longer to put through maintenance.”

“After considering the range of military air transport aircraft carefully, the Super Hercules has been selected as it offers the necessary range and payload capability as well as fully meeting NZDF’s requirements,” says Ron Mark.

A price will be sought through the United States’ Foreign Military Sale process for the C-130J-30 Super Hercules, manufactured by Lockheed Martin.

The C-130J is a proven aircraft, with more than 400 C-130Js having been delivered to over 21 nations, including the United States, United Kingdom, Australia and Canada.

“It is used by key defence partners and carries a greater payload faster and further than the current fleet, with no loss of ability to land where our current Hercules are deployed.

“Tactical air transport capability is one of the highest value assets available to New Zealand, offering huge utility to the community and nation, enabling movement of personnel and cargo around the country, the South Pacific, down to Antarctica and all around the globe.

“We need a proven performer, and this aircraft is tried and tested. We cannot take risks with what is one of our most critical military capabilities,” says Ron Mark.

No final contract decision has been made, on either platform numbers, detailed costs, or funding and Budget implications. A Project Implementation Business Case is scheduled to be progressed to Cabinet next year, where these matters will be considered. The Defence Capability Plan 2019 noted that the estimated cost would be more than $1 billion.

Note for Editors

The procurement process aligns with the findings of the Review of Defence Procurement Policies and Practices For Major Capability Projects, undertaken by Sir Brian Roche. A copy of this review can be found here:

https://defence.govt.nz/publications/pu ... y-projects

Ron Mark’s comments on this can be found here: https://www.beehive.govt.nz/release/def ... w-released


Perfectly solid choice for NZ. Not perfect, but certainly good enough.
 
tealnz
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Tue Jun 11, 2019 12:17 am

So where does that leaves things on
- McMurdo
- NH90 deployment?
 
ZaphodHarkonnen
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Tue Jun 11, 2019 12:25 am

Strategic airlift is still to be decided upon. So that may cover McMurdo stuff. Otherwise the J might meet the requirements. Don't think it does, but it might.

For deployment of the NH90 I expect that will be either Canterbury or hitching a lift with an ally. Also there are plans for a proper LHD type ship in the medium term.
 
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Tue Jun 11, 2019 3:58 am

Interesting the cutaway of the NZ P8 shows a MAD boom installed


I think the Indian Navy has these but not the USN
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Ozair
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Tue Jun 11, 2019 7:49 am

ZaphodHarkonnen wrote:
The Stuff article is wrong. The press release from MoD says no numbers have been decided on or contract signed.

Just that the C-130J-30 is the preferred option and they're going through the work with the US FMS now.

...

Perfectly solid choice for NZ. Not perfect, but certainly good enough.

Agree it was the obvious choice for NZDF. An existing C-130 customer with a proven aircraft that is in service with their major allied partners.

I expect the strategic lift decision will handle the Antarctic missions and it also shows that the assessments made here about how important, or not, air transport of NH-90s and LAVs around the Pacific is for NZ. It simply couldn't happen at the cost they were willing to pay.

The biggest loser here I think isn't the A400M, that was always going to be too much capability at too much cost for the NZDF, but the KC-390. Embraer have to have considered NZ a great opportunity but the immaturity of the platform with only one customer, who still hasn't accepted delivery of the first aircraft, would have been a big factor in the decision.
 
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Tue Jun 11, 2019 12:27 pm

I had guessed on KC-390 here.... Seems like it went out because it's not proven..?
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aumaverick
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Tue Jun 11, 2019 1:19 pm

SAS A340 wrote:
I had guessed on KC-390 here.... Seems like it went out because it's not proven..?


Not proven. Not supported in the region. No strategic partnership. No allies using the platform. All in all a tough sell for Embraer vs Lockheed.
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keesje
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Tue Jun 11, 2019 7:44 pm

Maybe too early for the KC-390 to be a serious option.
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texl1649
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Tue Jun 11, 2019 11:16 pm

The Boeing backing for the KC-390 was really not present in this bid. I know it’s not part of Boeing Brazil Commercial, but the partnership details on this and others is still pending some future revisions/approvals. I anticipate some exciting future developments to win ‘this type’ of competition vs. the J in the future.
 
A101
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Wed Jun 12, 2019 7:55 am

Ozair wrote:
ZaphodHarkonnen wrote:
The Stuff article is wrong. The press release from MoD says no numbers have been decided on or contract signed.

Just that the C-130J-30 is the preferred option and they're going through the work with the US FMS now.

...

Perfectly solid choice for NZ. Not perfect, but certainly good enough.

Agree it was the obvious choice for NZDF. An existing C-130 customer with a proven aircraft that is in service with their major allied partners.

I expect the strategic lift decision will handle the Antarctic missions and it also shows that the assessments made here about how important, or not, air transport of NH-90s and LAVs around the Pacific is for NZ. It simply couldn't happen at the cost they were willing to pay.

The biggest loser here I think isn't the A400M, that was always going to be too much capability at too much cost for the NZDF, but the KC-390. Embraer have to have considered NZ a great opportunity but the immaturity of the platform with only one customer, who still hasn't accepted delivery of the first aircraft, would have been a big factor in the decision.


Highly unlikely but I think A400 would still be a good choice for NZ in the strategic role, go to A-NZ for a PPP on VIP aircraft, I believe they are going to Boeing 777 reduces the up front costs but the backend will be steep
 
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Wed Jun 12, 2019 8:17 pm

A101 wrote:
Ozair wrote:
ZaphodHarkonnen wrote:
The Stuff article is wrong. The press release from MoD says no numbers have been decided on or contract signed.

Just that the C-130J-30 is the preferred option and they're going through the work with the US FMS now.

...

Perfectly solid choice for NZ. Not perfect, but certainly good enough.

Agree it was the obvious choice for NZDF. An existing C-130 customer with a proven aircraft that is in service with their major allied partners.

I expect the strategic lift decision will handle the Antarctic missions and it also shows that the assessments made here about how important, or not, air transport of NH-90s and LAVs around the Pacific is for NZ. It simply couldn't happen at the cost they were willing to pay.

The biggest loser here I think isn't the A400M, that was always going to be too much capability at too much cost for the NZDF, but the KC-390. Embraer have to have considered NZ a great opportunity but the immaturity of the platform with only one customer, who still hasn't accepted delivery of the first aircraft, would have been a big factor in the decision.


Highly unlikely but I think A400 would still be a good choice for NZ in the strategic role, go to A-NZ for a PPP on VIP aircraft, I believe they are going to Boeing 777 reduces the up front costs but the backend will be steep


O_o

I would honestly be shocked if they went B777 for the strategic airlift option. Such an aircraft would be huge for its use case. We're much more likely to see a B767-2C or A330 MRTT as the option. With my money on the Boeing.
 
A101
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Wed Jun 12, 2019 9:47 pm

Yes so would I if they went with a commercial again for strategic.

I only suggested the 777 if they wanted a mix of options across a broad spectrum of operation and wanted to save on the Initial up front costs, NZG has a large stake in A-NZ which could in theory lease VIP aircraft from A-NZ in a similar sort of arrangement of Voyager aircraft that are released to the civil market when not needed.

Methinks personally think the number RNZAF should comprise of
6x C130J-30 (tactical)
3x A400 (strategic)
3x Boeing 777 (VIP) (on lease with the 3rd aircraft floating between RNZAF/A-NZ when one of the aircraft go in for maintenance)
 
ZaphodHarkonnen
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Wed Jun 12, 2019 10:31 pm

A101 wrote:
Yes so would I if they went with a commercial again for strategic.

I only suggested the 777 if they wanted a mix of options across a broad spectrum of operation and wanted to save on the Initial up front costs, NZG has a large stake in A-NZ which could in theory lease VIP aircraft from A-NZ in a similar sort of arrangement of Voyager aircraft that are released to the civil market when not needed.

Methinks personally think the number RNZAF should comprise of
6x C130J-30 (tactical)
3x A400 (strategic)
3x Boeing 777 (VIP) (on lease with the 3rd aircraft floating between RNZAF/A-NZ when one of the aircraft go in for maintenance)


Yeah, that's totally a wishlist. No way do I see any near term governments going that far.

I expect like for like replacements. 5 Hercs at most. 2 aircraft to replace the B757s, maybe 3 depending on cost.
 
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Zkpilot
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Thu Jun 13, 2019 10:28 am

A101 wrote:
Yes so would I if they went with a commercial again for strategic.

I only suggested the 777 if they wanted a mix of options across a broad spectrum of operation and wanted to save on the Initial up front costs, NZG has a large stake in A-NZ which could in theory lease VIP aircraft from A-NZ in a similar sort of arrangement of Voyager aircraft that are released to the civil market when not needed.

Methinks personally think the number RNZAF should comprise of
6x C130J-30 (tactical)
3x A400 (strategic)
3x Boeing 777 (VIP) (on lease with the 3rd aircraft floating between RNZAF/A-NZ when one of the aircraft go in for maintenance)

That would be an almost doubling in capacity.
They have 5x C130H and 2x 752. The A400 is nearly doh Le the size of the C130H so unless they went for 4x C130J and 2x A400 (still a huge capacity increase) it’s not going to happen. As for the 752 replacement. A 777 is much larger to start with and to go with 3x to replace 2x smaller aircraft is also a non-starter.
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Ozair
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Thu Jun 13, 2019 12:50 pm

Zkpilot wrote:
A101 wrote:
Yes so would I if they went with a commercial again for strategic.

I only suggested the 777 if they wanted a mix of options across a broad spectrum of operation and wanted to save on the Initial up front costs, NZG has a large stake in A-NZ which could in theory lease VIP aircraft from A-NZ in a similar sort of arrangement of Voyager aircraft that are released to the civil market when not needed.

Methinks personally think the number RNZAF should comprise of
6x C130J-30 (tactical)
3x A400 (strategic)
3x Boeing 777 (VIP) (on lease with the 3rd aircraft floating between RNZAF/A-NZ when one of the aircraft go in for maintenance)

That would be an almost doubling in capacity.
They have 5x C130H and 2x 752. The A400 is nearly doh Le the size of the C130H so unless they went for 4x C130J and 2x A400 (still a huge capacity increase) it’s not going to happen. As for the 752 replacement. A 777 is much larger to start with and to go with 3x to replace 2x smaller aircraft is also a non-starter.


Interesting comments in flight global about the 757 replacement. Likely not to happen until 2028...

​Wellington outlines future airpower plans

Wellington plans to replace its Boeing 757 transport aircraft in 2028, outlining this and other initiatives in its Defence Capability Plan 2019.

The plan outlines the security issues that New Zealand will face in the coming decades, and the acquisition decisions it will make across all arms of its military.

For the 757 replacement Wellington has earmarked NZ$300-600 million ($198-396 million). It will start industry discussions in 2021, request for tender in 2024, and introduce the new aircraft into service in 2028.

www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/well ... ns-458853/

I think we can rule out the A400m with that budget. A couple of either new or more likely used 767s/A330s would seem to be about right here.
 
johns624
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Thu Jun 13, 2019 1:35 pm

People have to realize that NZ doesn't need much airlift capacity. They only have 2 light infantry battalions (app. 600 men each) in their army. As far as a "proper" LHD goes, same thing. How much ship do you need for transporting just a few troops? Also, their 3 Anzac class frigates are getting up there in age. They are 20+ years old. Australia has finalized plans to replace theirs with the Hunter-class (Type 26). New Zealand is losing their chance to piggyback onto that order for cost savings. There's no reason to buy a nice, shiny new LHD if the only thing you have to escort them with is obsolescent.
 
ZaphodHarkonnen
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Thu Jun 13, 2019 8:20 pm

johns624 wrote:
People have to realize that NZ doesn't need much airlift capacity. They only have 2 light infantry battalions (app. 600 men each) in their army. As far as a "proper" LHD goes, same thing. How much ship do you need for transporting just a few troops? Also, their 3 Anzac class frigates are getting up there in age. They are 20+ years old. Australia has finalized plans to replace theirs with the Hunter-class (Type 26). New Zealand is losing their chance to piggyback onto that order for cost savings. There's no reason to buy a nice, shiny new LHD if the only thing you have to escort them with is obsolescent.


2, not 3 Anzacs.

And the use for an LHD will be in Pacific related stuff. A big part of that being disaster response. Something bigger and more capable than the Canterbury would be a nice to have. Our Anzacs are also just going through their mid life upgrade to bring their capabilities back up. The big things being new radar and installation of SeaCeptor as the Sea Sparrow replacement.

As for the Type 26 it's probably too expensive for NZ needs. The Type 31e is much more appropriate in cost and capability.
 
johns624
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:22 pm

Sorry, I knew there were 2 but fat-fingered it. I was in Devonport in February of 2018. Nice neighborhood with a GREAT used book store. As far as disaster response goes, most scenarios would have them working with the Aussies, who already have 2 large LHDs. Canterbury is also a relatively new ship and doesn't need to be replaced. Amphibious ships don't become obsolescent much slower than frigates.
The reason that I brought up the Anzacs is that they piggybacked on the Aussie order and so had good interoperability and cost savings. They will lose that. I believe that NZ could afford a couple of T26's, but the political will isn't there. Yes, you are a smaller country, but your economy is relatively strong. Without an armoured force or any combat aircraft, your budget can be focused on only a few high value items...i.e. frigates and P8s.
 
ZaphodHarkonnen
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:35 pm

johns624 wrote:
Sorry, I knew there were 2 but fat-fingered it. I was in Devonport in February of 2018. Nice neighborhood with a GREAT used book store. As far as disaster response goes, most scenarios would have them working with the Aussies, who already have 2 large LHDs. Canterbury is also a relatively new ship and doesn't need to be replaced. Amphibious ships don't become obsolescent much slower than frigates.
The reason that I brought up the Anzacs is that they piggybacked on the Aussie order and so had good interoperability and cost savings. They will lose that. I believe that NZ could afford a couple of T26's, but the political will isn't there. Yes, you are a smaller country, but your economy is relatively strong. Without an armoured force or any combat aircraft, your budget can be focused on only a few high value items...i.e. frigates and P8s.


The Canterbury is a modified ferry design. So don't expect to get the same normal warship lifespan out of it. A more purpose built LHD would be useful for NZ even when working with Australia. Them having one of their LHDs available isn't a given. If we could just lean off Australia we wouldn't be replacing our fleet supply ship with a very capable new design. It is also worth looking at how NZ would be slotted in to help our allies in a big fight while also being appropriate for our independent needs. Two or three light general purpose frigates that can take over second line duties in a major operation works nicely for NZ. Powerful enough for solo patrols in more benign environments and able to free up more capable assets when needed.

As you note political will is needed. But that's always the case for any government purchase. This is why the Herc replacement has been kicked down the road for so long. We basically had to get to the point of the current ones being near grounded.
 
A101
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:45 pm

Zkpilot wrote:
A101 wrote:
Yes so would I if they went with a commercial again for strategic.

I only suggested the 777 if they wanted a mix of options across a broad spectrum of operation and wanted to save on the Initial up front costs, NZG has a large stake in A-NZ which could in theory lease VIP aircraft from A-NZ in a similar sort of arrangement of Voyager aircraft that are released to the civil market when not needed.

Methinks personally think the number RNZAF should comprise of
6x C130J-30 (tactical)
3x A400 (strategic)
3x Boeing 777 (VIP) (on lease with the 3rd aircraft floating between RNZAF/A-NZ when one of the aircraft go in for maintenance)

That would be an almost doubling in capacity.
They have 5x C130H and 2x 752. The A400 is nearly doh Le the size of the C130H so unless they went for 4x C130J and 2x A400 (still a huge capacity increase) it’s not going to happen. As for the 752 replacement. A 777 is much larger to start with and to go with 3x to replace 2x smaller aircraft is also a non-starter.



A400M for strat lift, while NZ defence force is not getting larger overall their equipment is. NZ has a need to move outsize loads that do not fit in a C130 basic thinks like the MAN HX range of vehicles,NH90 and quite possibly they may or may not tac onto the boxer production run to replace the NZLAV. Whilst these are not everyday loads they are loads that come at a premium to move operational instead of moving them commercially or via sealift as their may not be a port avalible. One must remember with NZ it’s tactical loads strategic distances with the greater range the A400M giveit gives them options on route planning.im just trying to remember a lift that the RAF did using both A400 and C130 the A400moved double the load in half the time at a more direct route.

It’s a pity that defence is second fiddle and not taken seriously, they should have jumped on the white tail C17 ‘s when they had the chance RAAF C17 hop over fairly regularly to move equipment for the Kiwis its not like they would not use the availability of the aircraft
 
johns624
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Thu Jun 13, 2019 10:03 pm

I'm not sure how often they plan on using their LAVs since they changed their 2 infantry battalions to light infantry and grouped all the LAVs in QAMR.
 
Kiwirob
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Sat Jun 15, 2019 2:37 pm

johns624 wrote:
The reason that I brought up the Anzacs is that they piggybacked on the Aussie order and so had good interoperability and cost savings. They will lose that. I believe that NZ could afford a couple of T26's, but the political will isn't there. Yes, you are a smaller country, but your economy is relatively strong. Without an armoured force or any combat aircraft, your budget can be focused on only a few high value items...i.e. frigates and P8s.


The Australians will still be building Hunter Class frigates when NZ is ready to order new frigates. They won’t commission the last one until some time in the 2030’s. Australia is also an expensive place to build a ship, the UK built type 26’s are cheaper, the Canadians builds will be more expensive. Type 31E if the Babcocks design wins will be more up our street in both capability and price.
 
johns624
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Sat Jun 15, 2019 3:17 pm

Kiwirob wrote:
The Australians will still be building Hunter Class frigates when NZ is ready to order new frigates. They won’t commission the last one until some time in the 2030’s. Australia is also an expensive place to build a ship, the UK built type 26’s are cheaper, the Canadians builds will be more expensive. Type 31E if the Babcocks design wins will be more up our street in both capability and price.
I agree with the Babcock entry based on the Danish frigates as being the best choice as long as they keep some area AAW and a decent ASW capability. The other two entries based on a corvette or enlarged OPV just don't have the all-around capabilities, IMO.
I know you're in the industry, so here's a question. How much of the increased price of the Aussie and Canadian versions due to labor cost and how much due to the different weapon systems installed?
 
Kiwirob
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Sat Jun 15, 2019 8:25 pm

johns624 wrote:
I'm not sure how often they plan on using their LAVs since they changed their 2 infantry battalions to light infantry and grouped all the LAVs in QAMR.


The army will increase to 6000 men, up from the current 4500 by the early 2030’s.
 
Kiwirob
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Sat Jun 15, 2019 8:28 pm

johns624 wrote:
Kiwirob wrote:
The Australians will still be building Hunter Class frigates when NZ is ready to order new frigates. They won’t commission the last one until some time in the 2030’s. Australia is also an expensive place to build a ship, the UK built type 26’s are cheaper, the Canadians builds will be more expensive. Type 31E if the Babcocks design wins will be more up our street in both capability and price.
I agree with the Babcock entry based on the Danish frigates as being the best choice as long as they keep some area AAW and a decent ASW capability. The other two entries based on a corvette or enlarged OPV just don't have the all-around capabilities, IMO.
I know you're in the industry, so here's a question. How much of the increased price of the Aussie and Canadian versions due to labor cost and how much due to the different weapon systems installed?


I’d say industry adjacent, on the supplier side. Labour costs in Australia and Canadia are higher than the UK, plus they have local content requirements which push up the prices. All three versions have different weapon systems as well. Lots of reasons why the prices are different.
 
Reddevil556
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Sun Jun 16, 2019 3:33 am

Kiwirob wrote:
johns624 wrote:
I'm not sure how often they plan on using their LAVs since they changed their 2 infantry battalions to light infantry and grouped all the LAVs in QAMR.


The army will increase to 6000 men, up from the current 4500 by the early 2030’s.


I had no idea the army was that small, I was with the Aussies for about 6 months in Afghanistan and I thought they were small. There are 3x as many infantry at Fort Bragg, NC alone
Jumped out of: C130H, C130J, C17A, C212, CH47, and UH60. Bucket list: C160, A400, C2
 
jupiter2
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Sun Jun 16, 2019 3:57 am

Reddevil556 wrote:
Kiwirob wrote:
johns624 wrote:
I'm not sure how often they plan on using their LAVs since they changed their 2 infantry battalions to light infantry and grouped all the LAVs in QAMR.


The army will increase to 6000 men, up from the current 4500 by the early 2030’s.


I had no idea the army was that small, I was with the Aussies for about 6 months in Afghanistan and I thought they were small. There are 3x as many infantry at Fort Bragg, NC alone


The combined population of New Zealand and Australia is about the same as Texas and more than 10 million less than California. Sydney and Melbourne both have populations almost equal or slightly above that of New Zealand.

We also don't have any desire, nor need, for a huge military.
 
Ozair
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Sun Jun 16, 2019 5:49 am

Reddevil556 wrote:
Kiwirob wrote:
johns624 wrote:
I'm not sure how often they plan on using their LAVs since they changed their 2 infantry battalions to light infantry and grouped all the LAVs in QAMR.


The army will increase to 6000 men, up from the current 4500 by the early 2030’s.


I had no idea the army was that small, I was with the Aussies for about 6 months in Afghanistan and I thought they were small. There are 3x as many infantry at Fort Bragg, NC alone

Not large that is for sure. The NYPD used to be larger than the Australian Defence Force...
 
Reddevil556
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Sun Jun 16, 2019 6:22 pm

Ozair wrote:
Reddevil556 wrote:
Kiwirob wrote:

The army will increase to 6000 men, up from the current 4500 by the early 2030’s.


I had no idea the army was that small, I was with the Aussies for about 6 months in Afghanistan and I thought they were small. There are 3x as many infantry at Fort Bragg, NC alone

Not large that is for sure. The NYPD used to be larger than the Australian Defence Force...


I thoroughly enjoyed my time with the different RARs that I was with overseas, I can’t remember which ones, I do remember one was from the Adelaide area.
Jumped out of: C130H, C130J, C17A, C212, CH47, and UH60. Bucket list: C160, A400, C2
 
Ozair
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Thu Nov 21, 2019 8:16 pm

The DSCA announcement has been released regarding the NZ C-130J acquisition. As with other DSCA prices this is the to end price and the final price is expected to be lower than the US$1.4 billion listed.

The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to New Zealand of five (5) C-130J aircraft and related equipment for an estimated cost of $1.4 billion. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale today.

The Government of New Zealand has requested to buy five (5) C-130J aircraft; twenty-four (24) Rolls Royce AE-2100D3 turboprop engines (20 installed, 4 spares); fifteen (15) Embedded Global Positioning System (GPS)/Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) (EGIs) with GPS security devices, airborne (10 installed, 5 spares); eight (8) Multi-Information Distribution System (MIDS)/Link-16 Low Video Terminal (LVT)-BU2 (5 installed, 3 spares); thirteen (13) AN/AAQ-24(V)N LAIRCM (Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures) System Processor Replacement (LSPR) (10 installed, 3 spares); and nineteen (19) Guardian Laser Transmitter Assembly for LAIRCM (15 installed, 4 spares). Also included are eight (8) AN/AAR-47 Missile Warning System (MWS); eight (8) AN/APN-241 Low Power Color Radar; eight (8) AN/ALR-56M Missile Warning System Receiver; fifteen (15) AN/ALE-47 Countermeasures Dispensing System; six (6) MX-20HD Electro-Optical/Infrared Imaging System; forty-four (44) Missile Warning Sensor, LAIRCM; Control Interface Unit Replacement, LAIRCM; classified memory cards, LAIRCM; Low Volume Terminal Cryptographic Modules KIV-55; AN/ARC-210 RT-1990A(C) Radio; AN/ARC- 164(V) RT-1518 Radio; AN/ARC-153 Tactical Air Navigation; AN/ARN-147 VHF Receiver; AN/ARC-190 HF Radio; AN/ARC-222 VHF Radio w/SINCGARS; Classified Tactical Manuals; Cartridge Activated Devices/Propellant Activated Devices; M206 Flares; MJU-64/B Decoy; BBU-35A/B Impulse Carts; Joint Mission Planning System; Classified Computer Identification Numbers; Electronic Combat International Security Assistance Program (ECISAP) support, support and test equipment, publications and technical documentation, personnel training and training equipment, U.S. Government and contractor engineering, technical and logistics support services; and other related elements of logistical and program support. The total estimated value is $1.4 billion.

This proposed sale will support the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping to improve the security of a major ally that is a force for political stability, and economic progress in the Asia-Pacific region. The proposed sale will improve New Zealand's capability to meet current and future threats by enhancing its current airlift capability.

This proposed sale will provide the capability to support national, United Nations, and other coalition operations. This purchase also includes sensors and performance improvements that will assist New Zealand during extensive maritime surveillance and reconnaissance as well as improve its search and rescue capability. Additionally, the extra cargo capacity and aircraft performance will greatly increase New Zealand's Antarctic mission capabilities while simultaneously increasing safety margins. New Zealand currently operates the C-l30H aircraft and will have no difficulty absorbing this equipment and support into its armed forces.

...

https://www.dsca.mil/major-arms-sales/n ... j-aircraft

Looks like they have gone the whole way with protective countermeasure equipment with the aircraft including a DIRCM, missile and radar warning receivers and Link 16.
 
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Zkpilot
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Re: RNZAF chooses C130Js to replace its C130Hs

Fri Nov 22, 2019 3:29 am

Ozair wrote:
The DSCA announcement has been released regarding the NZ C-130J acquisition. As with other DSCA prices this is the to end price and the final price is expected to be lower than the US$1.4 billion listed.

The State Department has made a determination approving a possible Foreign Military Sale to New Zealand of five (5) C-130J aircraft and related equipment for an estimated cost of $1.4 billion. The Defense Security Cooperation Agency delivered the required certification notifying Congress of this possible sale today.

The Government of New Zealand has requested to buy five (5) C-130J aircraft; twenty-four (24) Rolls Royce AE-2100D3 turboprop engines (20 installed, 4 spares); fifteen (15) Embedded Global Positioning System (GPS)/Inertial Navigation Systems (INS) (EGIs) with GPS security devices, airborne (10 installed, 5 spares); eight (8) Multi-Information Distribution System (MIDS)/Link-16 Low Video Terminal (LVT)-BU2 (5 installed, 3 spares); thirteen (13) AN/AAQ-24(V)N LAIRCM (Large Aircraft Infrared Countermeasures) System Processor Replacement (LSPR) (10 installed, 3 spares); and nineteen (19) Guardian Laser Transmitter Assembly for LAIRCM (15 installed, 4 spares). Also included are eight (8) AN/AAR-47 Missile Warning System (MWS); eight (8) AN/APN-241 Low Power Color Radar; eight (8) AN/ALR-56M Missile Warning System Receiver; fifteen (15) AN/ALE-47 Countermeasures Dispensing System; six (6) MX-20HD Electro-Optical/Infrared Imaging System; forty-four (44) Missile Warning Sensor, LAIRCM; Control Interface Unit Replacement, LAIRCM; classified memory cards, LAIRCM; Low Volume Terminal Cryptographic Modules KIV-55; AN/ARC-210 RT-1990A(C) Radio; AN/ARC- 164(V) RT-1518 Radio; AN/ARC-153 Tactical Air Navigation; AN/ARN-147 VHF Receiver; AN/ARC-190 HF Radio; AN/ARC-222 VHF Radio w/SINCGARS; Classified Tactical Manuals; Cartridge Activated Devices/Propellant Activated Devices; M206 Flares; MJU-64/B Decoy; BBU-35A/B Impulse Carts; Joint Mission Planning System; Classified Computer Identification Numbers; Electronic Combat International Security Assistance Program (ECISAP) support, support and test equipment, publications and technical documentation, personnel training and training equipment, U.S. Government and contractor engineering, technical and logistics support services; and other related elements of logistical and program support. The total estimated value is $1.4 billion.

This proposed sale will support the foreign policy and national security of the United States by helping to improve the security of a major ally that is a force for political stability, and economic progress in the Asia-Pacific region. The proposed sale will improve New Zealand's capability to meet current and future threats by enhancing its current airlift capability.

This proposed sale will provide the capability to support national, United Nations, and other coalition operations. This purchase also includes sensors and performance improvements that will assist New Zealand during extensive maritime surveillance and reconnaissance as well as improve its search and rescue capability. Additionally, the extra cargo capacity and aircraft performance will greatly increase New Zealand's Antarctic mission capabilities while simultaneously increasing safety margins. New Zealand currently operates the C-l30H aircraft and will have no difficulty absorbing this equipment and support into its armed forces.

...

https://www.dsca.mil/major-arms-sales/n ... j-aircraft

Looks like they have gone the whole way with protective countermeasure equipment with the aircraft including a DIRCM, missile and radar warning receivers and Link 16.

As they should do as NZ can’t afford to lose an aircraft really (let alone human life).
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