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DIRECTFLT
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Apollo 11 in Real Time

Fri Jul 19, 2019 9:27 pm

https://apolloinrealtime.org/11/

Moment by moment... from 50 years ago today!!
Smoothest Ride so far ~ AA A300B4-600R ~~ Favorite Aviation Author ~ Robert J. Serling
 
mpgunner
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Re: Apollo 11 in Real Time

Sat Jul 20, 2019 2:39 am

It is awesome. I went back and watched again in several areas. The right side showing the mission control seating area and highlighting who was talking was pretty cool. Amazing planning and teamwork.
 
caliboy93
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50th Anniversary of Apollo 11

Sat Jul 20, 2019 9:51 pm

So 50 years ago today was one of mankind's finest achievements - landing on the moon. I was born much later but still very inspired by this. Anyone have any memories of the event?
I wish we could do something similar today because we really need to unite the world again.
 
KFLLCFII
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Re: 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11

Sat Jul 20, 2019 10:17 pm

caliboy93 wrote:
So 50 years ago today was one of mankind's finest achievements - landing on the moon. I was born much later but still very inspired by this. Anyone have any memories of the event?
I wish we could do something similar today because we really need to unite the world again.


Apollo marked peak America.

Although since early 2017, we have at least begun looking and taking baby steps in that direction again.
"About the only way to look at it, just a pity you are not POTUS KFLLCFII, seems as if we would all be better off."
 
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Aaron747
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Re: 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11

Sat Jul 20, 2019 11:17 pm

The science, engineering, and teamwork required to pull off the Apollo program are absolutely inspirational. The technology developed for these missions left a mark on people’s lives many don’t realize or appreciate.

Unfortunately appreciation for science and technical achievement has waned in recent years and I find this 50th anniversary bittersweet. In many articles about it are a litany of moronic comments about the missions being fake, the astronauts being liars, and so on. The lack of science understanding and spread of disinformation in our current discourse is a huge threat to the possibility of any future inspirational endeavors like Apollo.
If you need someone to blame / throw a rock in the air / you'll hit someone guilty
 
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ER757
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Re: 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11

Sat Jul 20, 2019 11:31 pm

caliboy93 wrote:
So 50 years ago today was one of mankind's finest achievements - landing on the moon. I was born much later but still very inspired by this. Anyone have any memories of the event?
I wish we could do something similar today because we really need to unite the world again.

I remember it vividly - I was 14 at the time. When Apollo 11 launched, my family and I were en-route home to the Chicago area from a three week road trip out west. We watched it from our motel room in Omaha and got home that night. On the 20th, my best friend was staying overnight with us and he and I watched the first steps on my little 19 inch black and white TV up in my room while my parents were watching the bigger TV in the basement. It was, I believe, the single greatest moment in mankind's history.
 
ltbewr
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Re: 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11

Sun Jul 21, 2019 4:00 am

I was 14, watching on the 23" Black & White, the grainy pictures of this historic moment in the living room of my parent's home in NJ. Stayed up late until they completed the walk. Tonight I saw some parts on C-Span a condensed and edited replay of CBS's coverage of the walk.

Consider the computer power in the spacecraft was less than your modern smartphone, that this was something nobody knew how or if it would work out, but it was done. In part it was to 'beat the Ruskies' and we did but to also bring the country, and indeed the world together.

Going to and the success of the mission to walk on the Moon was badly needed as it came at one of the most tumultuous times in the USA's history. The 2 previous years saw massively destructive 'race riots' in cities across the USA, wars and continued tensions involving Israel, the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert F. Kennedy. The Vietnam War was at near peak of death of our soldiers and violent opposition to it and the draft for soldiers was rising and getting worse. Politics had taken racial turns for the worse, with then Pres. Nixon's 'War on Crime', 'White flight' from our cities, busing of school children to de-segregate meeting violent opposition by White parents. Black citizens were still massively discriminated despite the Civil Rights Laws. A few days before the Moon landing, Sen. Ted Kennedy had caused the death of a woman while drunk driving, and he would never get punished for it 'as a Kennedy'. Illegal drugs from pot to heroin were becoming more popular with the White middle and working class.

But it wasn't all bad. We saw the rise of anger of GLTBQ's for their rights. There was great music, less than a month after the landing on the moon was Woodstock, the historic and relatively non-violent music festival where up to 400,000 had gathered. There were plenty of good paying jobs, housing and college were relatively cheap. We were taking the first significant steps to clean up our enviroment.

Since the moon landings, the last in 1972, we saw a shift in space travel to space stations to do experiments. we need to continue to do that today, to study our earth from space to try to protect it from itself. We should celebrate this great accomplishment, one of the greatest of humankind, truly 'one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind'.
 
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Dutchy
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Re: 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11

Sun Jul 21, 2019 8:18 am

Appolo 11 marked a fundamental step in human exploration. One great achievement for the world as one. Thanks for remembering this special event.

Neil Armstrong wrote:
That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.
Many happy landings, greetings from The Netherlands!
 
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Dutchy
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Re: 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11

Sun Jul 21, 2019 8:22 am

caliboy93 wrote:
I wish we could do something similar today because we really need to unite the world again.


Yes, I wish that too, You have to understand, though, that the Apollo program was born out of competition with the Soviet Union, they let the space race with a wide margin, that prompted John F Kennedy in setting a goal so outrage that it was inspirational and united the US in achieving it. The world actually is quite united in the International Space Station, that is a good example of international cooperation in space.
Many happy landings, greetings from The Netherlands!
 
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Braybuddy
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Re: 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11

Sun Jul 21, 2019 9:10 am

Yesterday, for the day that was in it, I climbed into the dark recesses of the attic and fished-out the following, spending the day wandering down memory lane:

Image

I was a wide-eyed 15-year-old, fascinated by space, but frustrated by the lack of material at the time. I think I was hooked by the first episode of Dr Who six years previously. After that I was glued to anything and everything about space travel and the future. So all the Apollo missions were by far the most exciting things to be happening on the planet -- to me anyway -- and I couldn't get enough of them.

It was the very first time I stayed-up all night (Neil Armstrong didn't set foot the lunar suface until almost 4am here), which made it all the more exciting. I was the only member of the family fascinated enough to do so, and it was a strange experience, involving plenty of cups of tea. I couldn't understand how anyone would want to miss the most exciting moment of the decade. I could just-about make out the grainy images, but they were riveting. My awe was struck. I had to work at 8am, so must have managed nodding-off on the sofa after all the excitement had died down. The morning of 21 July was a beautiful sunny day, in more ways than one, as I walked to work, looking up at the sky and smiling. Of course I had to stop off and buy the newspapers, and for some reason I can remember Honky Tonk Woman playing over and over in my head, and even that sounded better than it ever did. It was the first day I remember that I can actually put a date to. A new decade was just around the corner, and the world seemed full of optimism and wonderful possibilities.

Looking back now I can't help feeling we were short-changed. I've watched Apollo 11 and 8 Days to the Moon and Back and marvel at how the event was achieved. When you look at the 21st century cock-ups in the A380 and 787 programmes July 1969 doesn't seem to be that old fashioned at all.

Incidentally, note the spelling of "Monday" in the dateline on the Evening Press . :D
 
Ozair
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Re: 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11

Sun Jul 21, 2019 10:33 am

Dutchy wrote:
caliboy93 wrote:
I wish we could do something similar today because we really need to unite the world again.


Yes, I wish that too, You have to understand, though, that the Apollo program was born out of competition with the Soviet Union, they let the space race with a wide margin, that prompted John F Kennedy in setting a goal so outrage that it was inspirational and united the US in achieving it.

While I love the space program it is a common misconception to believe that the program united the US. It was opposed by a majority of the public at the time and even for years afterwards.

many people believe that Project Apollo was popular, probably because it garnered significant media attention, but the polls do not support a contention that Americans embraced the lunar landing mission. Consistently throughout the 1960s a majority of Americans did not believe Apollo was worth the cost, with the one exception to this a poll taken at the time of the Apollo 11 lunar landing in July 1969. And consistently throughout the decade 45-60 percent of Americans believed that the government was spending too much onspace, indicative of a lack of commitment to the spaceflight agenda. These data do not support a contention that most people approved of Apollo and thought it important to explore space.

https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/ ... am/262254/

The academic paper that has the results of the respective opinion polls at the time, https://www.academia.edu/179045/_Public ... aceflight_

Some graphics of moon opposition,

Image

Image

Yes the 60s was a time of general protest but the opinion polls make it quite clear how the majority of Americans felt.

Braybuddy wrote:
Yesterday, for the day that was in it, I climbed into the dark recesses of the attic and fished-out the following, spending the day wandering down memory lane:

Incredible that you still have those! Thanks for sharing.
 
GalaxyFlyer
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Re: 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11

Sun Jul 21, 2019 2:09 pm

Yes, not widely supported by the opinion polls of US citizens, but LBJ wisely spread the money and facilities across the South—Texas, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida; private contractors in most southern states. He did it to get Congressional support. There was chumminess in Congress “across the aisle” that meant Congress got things done without listening to the public.

GF
 
GDB
Posts: 13235
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Re: 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11

Sun Jul 21, 2019 5:04 pm

Braybuddy wrote:
Yesterday, for the day that was in it, I climbed into the dark recesses of the attic and fished-out the following, spending the day wandering down memory lane:

Image

I was a wide-eyed 15-year-old, fascinated by space, but frustrated by the lack of material at the time. I think I was hooked by the first episode of Dr Who six years previously. After that I was glued to anything and everything about space travel and the future. So all the Apollo missions were by far the most exciting things to be happening on the planet -- to me anyway -- and I couldn't get enough of them.

It was the very first time I stayed-up all night (Neil Armstrong didn't set foot the lunar suface until almost 4am here), which made it all the more exciting. I was the only member of the family fascinated enough to do so, and it was a strange experience, involving plenty of cups of tea. I couldn't understand how anyone would want to miss the most exciting moment of the decade. I could just-about make out the grainy images, but they were riveting. My awe was struck. I had to work at 8am, so must have managed nodding-off on the sofa after all the excitement had died down. The morning of 21 July was a beautiful sunny day, in more ways than one, as I walked to work, looking up at the sky and smiling. Of course I had to stop off and buy the newspapers, and for some reason I can remember Honky Tonk Woman playing over and over in my head, and even that sounded better than it ever did. It was the first day I remember that I can actually put a date to. A new decade was just around the corner, and the world seemed full of optimism and wonderful possibilities.

Looking back now I can't help feeling we were short-changed. I've watched Apollo 11 and 8 Days to the Moon and Back and marvel at how the event was achieved. When you look at the 21st century cock-ups in the A380 and 787 programmes July 1969 doesn't seem to be that old fashioned at all.

Incidentally, note the spelling of "Monday" in the dateline on the Evening Press . :D


I will be seeing Apollo 11, was very impressed by the BBC's '8 Days To The Moon And Back', which sounded like it could be a dud, the actual voices of the crew lip-synced by actors but it worked really well, as someone fascinated by this subject and I think, with a lot of knowledge about it, there was new things to learn, even more by them buying the Robert Stone series 'Chasing The Moon'. Plus of lot of other mostly good content.
(They even brought James Burke back on for a Sky At Night special!)

It was the greatest achievement of exploration and technology. The conspiracy types are ignorant, sad, attention seekers, or just gullible to the point of imbecility. They make a lot of noise, in certain places, out of proportion to their actual numbers.
And if they are American, they are also being fundamentally unpatriotic.

Cannot claim to have remembered Apollo 11, too young, the first one I really recall is the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, we had a teacher who got us in the assembly hall, where a TV had been positioned. He also urged us to see the film '2001' though we were really too young for it, though I made a note to. A few months later, he got us on to the top floor to watch the first Concorde passenger flight from LHR-BAH.
 
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ER757
Posts: 3426
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Re: 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11

Sun Jul 21, 2019 6:20 pm

Dutchy wrote:
Appolo 11 marked a fundamental step in human exploration. One great achievement for the world as one. Thanks for remembering this special event.

Neil Armstrong wrote:
That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.

A few years before he passed away, Armstrong did an interview and said he messed up his first words. He meant to say "one small step for A man" which makes a lot more sense than just "man"
 
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Braybuddy
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Re: 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11

Sun Jul 21, 2019 7:26 pm

GDB wrote:
I will be seeing Apollo 11, was very impressed by the BBC's '8 Days To The Moon And Back', which sounded like it could be a dud, the actual voices of the crew lip-synced by actors but it worked really well, as someone fascinated by this subject and I think, with a lot of knowledge about it, there was new things to learn, even more by them buying the Robert Stone series 'Chasing The Moon'. Plus of lot of other mostly good content.
(They even brought James Burke back on for a Sky At Night special!)

It was the greatest achievement of exploration and technology. The conspiracy types are ignorant, sad, attention seekers, or just gullible to the point of imbecility. They make a lot of noise, in certain places, out of proportion to their actual numbers.
And if they are American, they are also being fundamentally unpatriotic.

Cannot claim to have remembered Apollo 11, too young, the first one I really recall is the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, we had a teacher who got us in the assembly hall, where a TV had been positioned. He also urged us to see the film '2001' though we were really too young for it, though I made a note to. A few months later, he got us on to the top floor to watch the first Concorde passenger flight from LHR-BAH.

Indeed. I was apprehensive about "8 Days to the Moon and Back" as well: in theory it sounded awful, but I heard a rave review so watched it the other night. It was superb (it also fills in bits that Apollo 11 missed) and I'll watch it again soon for sure. I used to love James Burke's science programmes (and only discovered the other day that he's from Northern Ireland and still alive) so that was a smart touch by the Sky at Night team.

The conspiracy theories are easily debunked. The "faked photos" conspiracy is proposed by people who know nothing of photography: the "converging shadows" and "starless sky" theories are easily debunked by simply googling them. Also, for the whole thing to have been faked, up to 400,000 (the people involved in the project) would have had to have been fooled, and, of course, none of them have come forward since to expose the "conspiracy". Also, the Spanish and Australians would have had to have been on board as their tracking stations covered Apollo 11 when the US couldn't. And, last, but not least, even the USSR -- surely the most likely country to propose any conspiracy -- never doubted the mission.

And go to see Apollo 11. I would have loved to see it in IMAX, but unfortunately missed it. However I did the next best thing and sat in the front row. The sheer scale and power of the Saturn V roll-out and lift-off is simply breathtaking. :shock:
 
GDB
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Re: 50th Anniversary of Apollo 11

Tue Jul 23, 2019 10:52 am

A legend of this great effort has passed away, Chris Kraft RIP;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3zOeNKXAI8

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