Moderators: richierich, ua900, PanAm_DC10, hOMSaR

 
LTEN11
Posts: 474
Joined: Sun Jun 14, 2020 10:09 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Fri May 20, 2022 11:01 am

Avatar2go wrote:
ZaphodHarkonnen wrote:
Perhaps not as smoothly as expected or wanted. 2 thrusters shut down unexpectedly during the insertion burn. The FCS was able to adapt but still not a good look at all.

https://www.theverge.com/2022/5/19/2313 ... nasa-oft-2

Today, the thruster firing seemed to go well initially, and Starliner is in its intended orbit. However, after the flight, Boeing revealed that two thrusters actually failed during the orbital insertion, shutting down earlier than intended. The first shut down after one second, and the flight control system rerouted to a second thruster nearby. However, that one also shut down early after just 25 seconds, and the system had to reroute to a third thruster, which worked as intended. All in all, it didn’t affect Starliner’s ability to reach its planned orbit. Boeing is studying the issue, though the company and NASA claim the failed thrusters should not impact Starliner’s ability to perform the rest of its mission.


To clarify from the post-launch media briefing, there are 12 OMAC thrusters distributed between 4 doghouses. In the port doghouse, 2 of the thrusters had early shutdowns, but the 3rd was ok. Starliner has levels of redundancy that include the loss of any one doghouse, with the others compensating. The RCS thrusters can also suffice in a pinch. It was not necessary to invoke those scenarios.

They are reviewing the data to understand the early shutdowns on the 2 thrusters, and may be able to recover them in flight. They mentioned that it could be an instrumentation or software setting issue.

Overall the flight is still nominal and there are no concerns about the mission at all. There are 4 more OMAC burns scheduled, 3 before the docking and 1 for de-orbit. All could also be done with RCS if that became necessary.


I appreciate your comments on here, they are clear, concise, with a level of detail that is interesting, but not overwhelming with tech jargon. Oh and without a level of hysteria, just reporting the details, Thanks.
 
Opus99
Posts: 3399
Joined: Thu May 30, 2019 10:51 pm

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Fri May 20, 2022 12:46 pm

LTEN11 wrote:
Avatar2go wrote:
ZaphodHarkonnen wrote:
Perhaps not as smoothly as expected or wanted. 2 thrusters shut down unexpectedly during the insertion burn. The FCS was able to adapt but still not a good look at all.

https://www.theverge.com/2022/5/19/2313 ... nasa-oft-2



To clarify from the post-launch media briefing, there are 12 OMAC thrusters distributed between 4 doghouses. In the port doghouse, 2 of the thrusters had early shutdowns, but the 3rd was ok. Starliner has levels of redundancy that include the loss of any one doghouse, with the others compensating. The RCS thrusters can also suffice in a pinch. It was not necessary to invoke those scenarios.

They are reviewing the data to understand the early shutdowns on the 2 thrusters, and may be able to recover them in flight. They mentioned that it could be an instrumentation or software setting issue.

Overall the flight is still nominal and there are no concerns about the mission at all. There are 4 more OMAC burns scheduled, 3 before the docking and 1 for de-orbit. All could also be done with RCS if that became necessary.


I appreciate your comments on here, they are clear, concise, with a level of detail that is interesting, but not overwhelming with tech jargon. Oh and without a level of hysteria, just reporting the details, Thanks.

Agreed. Very insightful as well
 
Avatar2go
Posts: 950
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2022 3:41 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Sat May 21, 2022 12:08 am

Starliner is holding at 10 meters off of ISS Harmony. A delay of about 90 minutes as they have addressed various minor issues. Docking expected 8:46 pm ET.
 
Spetsnaz55
Posts: 361
Joined: Wed Feb 20, 2019 2:38 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Sat May 21, 2022 12:34 am

Docking complete
 
User avatar
ikolkyo
Posts: 3728
Joined: Tue Nov 05, 2013 8:43 pm

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Sat May 21, 2022 12:37 am

Congrats to Boeing! Long time coming and good to see this program starting down the right track.
 
Avatar2go
Posts: 950
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2022 3:41 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Sat May 21, 2022 12:50 am

Starliner soft capture at 8:28 pm, hard docking at 8:50 pm ET. Docking 100% successful. Hatch opening tomorrow with coverage starting around 11:30 am ET.

A good mission thus far, NASA worked about 20 minor issues over the flight. All resolved without difficulty, including the earlier OMAC thruster issue.
 
Avatar2go
Posts: 950
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2022 3:41 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Sat May 21, 2022 2:32 am

From the post-docking Starliner media conference, the two OMAC thruster problems were both low chamber pressure, which triggered a shutdown. Happened a second time today so they just mapped those thrusters out, since they have plenty of redundancy. Two RCS thrusters also failed during maneuvering today, but again there is ample redundancy so they just turned them off.

Also had a problem develop in the two cooling loops, which developed excess pressure and low flow rates. They resolved this by duty-cycling the radiators to boost flow and lower pressure, which has worked well as again there is ample capacity. Thought to be related to the system possibly freezing as there was a very low heat load without the crew.

There was an intermittent problem with one of the Starliner directional antennas, that caused momentary LOS to ground stations, but communication was continuous to ISS. Also the docking system got into an incorrect configuration when the ring was extended, but stowing it and resetting the system fixed the issue. Lastly there was small glitch in the computer graphics drawing, that showed a small offset in the Starliner location. They confirmed the offset was not real and proceeded.

Leuders mentioned that all the effort, planning, and time invested in the spacecraft pays off, when unexpected problems occur but the team quickly works around them. That is an excellent point, and exactly right.
 
Opus99
Posts: 3399
Joined: Thu May 30, 2019 10:51 pm

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Sat May 21, 2022 7:39 am

Congrats to Boeing and the Starliner team. My hope is that this is the beginning of more favourable news and fortunes to come from Boeing. It’s good to be able to show and demonstrate that the company is still able to deliver great engineering feats. Well done
 
zanl188
Posts: 3945
Joined: Sat Oct 21, 2006 9:05 pm

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Sat May 21, 2022 4:38 pm

Hatch opening occurred about 30 minutes ago. ISS crew now aboard Starliner.

Jebediah Kerbin was the zero-g indicator :-)
 
FGITD
Posts: 2118
Joined: Wed Jun 15, 2016 1:44 pm

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Sat May 21, 2022 8:36 pm

Rogozin looking more and more foolish now. From where I’m standing, I see 2 new and modern American spacecraft docked to the ISS. So much for the broomsticks.

For all the misgivings and problems they’ve had, it is great to see starliner operating as it’s supposed to. Can’t wait to see it fly crews.

Also got me wondering…to my knowledge, once starliner is certified for human spaceflight, this will be the first time the US has multiple spacecraft options. NASA had a tendency to finish one project before starting the next. But within the next few years, the USA could potentially have 3-4 viable options (excluding Virgin, blue origin since they’re tourist rides)
 
Avatar2go
Posts: 950
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2022 3:41 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Sat May 21, 2022 9:27 pm

FGITD wrote:
Rogozin looking more and more foolish now. From where I’m standing, I see 2 new and modern American spacecraft docked to the ISS. So much for the broomsticks.

For all the misgivings and problems they’ve had, it is great to see starliner operating as it’s supposed to. Can’t wait to see it fly crews.

Also got me wondering…to my knowledge, once starliner is certified for human spaceflight, this will be the first time the US has multiple spacecraft options. NASA had a tendency to finish one project before starting the next. But within the next few years, the USA could potentially have 3-4 viable options (excluding Virgin, blue origin since they’re tourist rides)


Rogozin actually congratulated Nelson on the success of Starliner. Also Roscosmos said this week they had deemed commercial crew safe, and were willing to allow cosmonauts to participate. The Russian ISS commander gave welcoming remarks in English today. So the Russians may be toning things down a bit.

Agreed that it's good to see US space flight options expanding. Starliner had a tough journey but it's there now.
 
User avatar
Phosphorus
Posts: 1590
Joined: Tue May 16, 2017 11:38 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Sat May 21, 2022 9:33 pm

FGITD wrote:
Rogozin looking more and more foolish now. From where I’m standing, I see 2 new and modern American spacecraft docked to the ISS. So much for the broomsticks.

For all the misgivings and problems they’ve had, it is great to see starliner operating as it’s supposed to. Can’t wait to see it fly crews.

Also got me wondering…to my knowledge, once starliner is certified for human spaceflight, this will be the first time the US has multiple spacecraft options. NASA had a tendency to finish one project before starting the next. But within the next few years, the USA could potentially have 3-4 viable options (excluding Virgin, blue origin since they’re tourist rides)

I find it absolutely fascinating, how russia just blew it.
They inherited, from USSR, a proven workhorse, that saw hell and high water, and was capable of riding crew to safety through anomalies, malfunctions and outright disasters. The Soyuz.
All they needed to do was to milk it, and convince everyone else (Americans first and foremost) -- you have a safe guaranteed human ride to LEO. Focus on your investment into something beyond. Just don't forget to send the check for that taxi ride to LEO.

In the meantime, they managed to alienate, and downright piss off, pretty much everyone. Everyone of consequence, at least.

Now they have a billionaire geek and an entrenched aerospace giant, with NASA contracts in hand, delivering solutions focusing specifically on that -- a human ride to LEO. Plus a couple of more billionaires developing human flight to LEO -- both joyrides, and the real thing too.

Godspeed Starliner!
 
GDB
Posts: 15371
Joined: Wed May 23, 2001 6:25 pm

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Sun May 22, 2022 6:09 pm

Phosphorus wrote:
FGITD wrote:
Rogozin looking more and more foolish now. From where I’m standing, I see 2 new and modern American spacecraft docked to the ISS. So much for the broomsticks.

For all the misgivings and problems they’ve had, it is great to see starliner operating as it’s supposed to. Can’t wait to see it fly crews.

Also got me wondering…to my knowledge, once starliner is certified for human spaceflight, this will be the first time the US has multiple spacecraft options. NASA had a tendency to finish one project before starting the next. But within the next few years, the USA could potentially have 3-4 viable options (excluding Virgin, blue origin since they’re tourist rides)

I find it absolutely fascinating, how russia just blew it.
They inherited, from USSR, a proven workhorse, that saw hell and high water, and was capable of riding crew to safety through anomalies, malfunctions and outright disasters. The Soyuz.
All they needed to do was to milk it, and convince everyone else (Americans first and foremost) -- you have a safe guaranteed human ride to LEO. Focus on your investment into something beyond. Just don't forget to send the check for that taxi ride to LEO.

In the meantime, they managed to alienate, and downright piss off, pretty much everyone. Everyone of consequence, at least.

Now they have a billionaire geek and an entrenched aerospace giant, with NASA contracts in hand, delivering solutions focusing specifically on that -- a human ride to LEO. Plus a couple of more billionaires developing human flight to LEO -- both joyrides, and the real thing too.

Godspeed Starliner!


I agree, Boeing have dropped the ball a lot, even before we consider SLS, however this vehicle has got there and hopefully we will see a manned flight before the end of the year.
Scott Manley's update puts the anomalies encountered into proper context, from 4.55;
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXEdTtoLJj0
 
User avatar
kitplane01
Posts: 2479
Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2016 5:58 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Sun May 22, 2022 7:07 pm

Can someone compare Starliner vs Crewed Dragon in terms of development cost and time? Everyone says SpaceX is best, but where they better in this case?
 
FGITD
Posts: 2118
Joined: Wed Jun 15, 2016 1:44 pm

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Sun May 22, 2022 8:16 pm

kitplane01 wrote:
Can someone compare Starliner vs Crewed Dragon in terms of development cost and time? Everyone says SpaceX is best, but where they better in this case?


In the Simplest terms, Boeing and SpaceX were awarded the contracts with the same requirements simultaneously and at present, Boeing has yet to fully complete 1 test flight. Crew dragon on the other hand completed its first Manned flight almost 2 years ago and has just about completed the original contract for manned flights.

It could be argued that SpaceX either had an advantage or disadvantage in that they were also developing and using their own launch vehicle. It gave them more vertical integration and oversight…but also a huge amount of responsibility that fell exclusively on them
 
Avatar2go
Posts: 950
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2022 3:41 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Sun May 22, 2022 8:49 pm

One major difference was that SpaceX, as the new kid on the block, had embedded NASA engineers, whereas Boeing was thought to not need them. After OFT-1, Boeing got them too, as well as heavy scrutiny from ASAP.

So there was a loss of institutional knowledge that occurred at Boeing, within the context of CCP, in terms of developing and carrying out a rigorous test program for their internal capsule development. Which was the root cause of the OFT-1 problems.

For all the criticism of NASA and claims that they can be supplanted by commercial entities, they are a deep reservoir of knowledge and experience, which has benefitted all their commercial partners.
 
Avatar2go
Posts: 950
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2022 3:41 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Sun May 22, 2022 9:14 pm

Another difference was that SpaceX was developing a crew version from their established cargo version of Dragon, whereas Boeing was starting from scratch with a new vehicle. So Starliner was expected to take longer and cost more. But the OFT-1 issues were completely avoidable, so the delay past that is completely on Boeing, as is all the excess cost.
 
User avatar
JetBuddy
Posts: 2860
Joined: Wed Dec 25, 2013 1:04 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Sun May 22, 2022 9:30 pm

What is the cost per launch comparison? What is NASA, ESA or private companies paying for a seat / launch?

I mean SpaceX Crew Dragon vs Boeing Starliner.
 
User avatar
flyingturtle
Posts: 6356
Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2011 1:39 pm

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Sun May 22, 2022 9:42 pm

JetBuddy wrote:
What is the cost per launch comparison? What is NASA, ESA or private companies paying for a seat / launch?

I mean SpaceX Crew Dragon vs Boeing Starliner.


A Falcon 9 launch alone can be ordered for 65 million $, but add to that the capsule maintenance, refurbishment, the crucial keep-those-humans-alive systems and other costs...

"NASA paid an average of $55.4 million per seat on Roscosmos’ Soyuz launch system between 2006 and 2020. By the end of that period, NASA was paying the Russian agency a reported $86 million per seat. The same OIG report estimated SpaceX’s average cost per seat to be $55 million and Boeing’s $90 million."

https://techcrunch.com/2022/02/28/nasa- ... 0-million/
 
Avatar2go
Posts: 950
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2022 3:41 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Sun May 22, 2022 10:05 pm

JetBuddy wrote:
What is the cost per launch comparison? What is NASA, ESA or private companies paying for a seat / launch?

I mean SpaceX Crew Dragon vs Boeing Starliner.


NASA paid $86M per seat for the Soyuz missions. Recently they extended the SpaceX contract by 12 seats for $75M per seat. The Starliner cost , as part of the original development contract, is $90M per seat.

However these numbers don't consider included cargo (up & down), which both vehicles can carry. Starliner can potentially carry one more astronaut per launch, although there are no plans to do so. That seat will be used for cargo instead. Also NASA paid Boeing a premium for the ability to add launches if needed.

As things have worked out, NASA has now paid SpaceX for the extra flights, so likely will hold the acquired Boeing extra launch capability in future reserve.

We won't have a true comparison cost until NASA extends the contract for Starliner seats, which might not happen if the ISS is retired in 2030. There is probably already enough capacity to last until then.
 
User avatar
Tugger
Topic Author
Posts: 11919
Joined: Tue Apr 18, 2006 8:38 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Mon May 23, 2022 3:54 pm

OK, and the next next question: How many Starliner capsules is Boeing contracted to or expected to build?

SpaceX has already halted building new Crew Dragon 2's as the current fleet of four will suffice for current expected flight needs.

Tugg
 
Avatar2go
Posts: 950
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2022 3:41 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Mon May 23, 2022 6:00 pm

Tugger wrote:
OK, and the next next question: How many Starliner capsules is Boeing contracted to or expected to build?

SpaceX has already halted building new Crew Dragon 2's as the current fleet of four will suffice for current expected flight needs.

Tugg


They are all built. 4 Crew Dragon and 2 Starliner. That's what was needed to fulfill the contractual obligations. Each could build more if requested.

Starliner can turnaround faster since it doesn't land in water. Boeing was originally going to build 4 but decided 2 was enough.
 
User avatar
Tugger
Topic Author
Posts: 11919
Joined: Tue Apr 18, 2006 8:38 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Mon May 23, 2022 6:30 pm

Avatar2go wrote:
Tugger wrote:
OK, and the next next question: How many Starliner capsules is Boeing contracted to or expected to build?

SpaceX has already halted building new Crew Dragon 2's as the current fleet of four will suffice for current expected flight needs.

Tugg


They are all built. 4 Crew Dragon and 2 Starliner. That's what was needed to fulfill the contractual obligations. Each could build more if requested.

Starliner can turnaround faster since it doesn't land in water. Boeing was originally going to build 4 but decided 2 was enough.

Gotcha, Thanks!

Tugg
 
User avatar
Nomadd
Posts: 628
Joined: Sat Dec 09, 2017 3:26 pm

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Mon May 23, 2022 6:46 pm

Avatar2go wrote:
Tugger wrote:
OK, and the next next question: How many Starliner capsules is Boeing contracted to or expected to build?
SpaceX has already halted building new Crew Dragon 2's as the current fleet of four will suffice for current expected flight needs.
Tugg

They are all built. 4 Crew Dragon and 2 Starliner. That's what was needed to fulfill the contractual obligations. Each could build more if requested.
Starliner can turnaround faster since it doesn't land in water. Boeing was originally going to build 4 but decided 2 was enough.


You want to bet Starliner will turn around faster? They have about six times as much to replace as Dragon every flight.
The count sort of tells you the attitude of each company. SpaceX built one more than they needed for the NASA and private flights on their own dime to account for unexpected problems. Boeing built the bare minimum and will leave NASA hanging if anything goes wrong. SpaceX spending their own money to go above and beyond contract requirements is why they were able to make up for Boeing's mess in the first place.
 
Avatar2go
Posts: 950
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2022 3:41 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Mon May 23, 2022 7:06 pm

Nomadd wrote:
Avatar2go wrote:
Tugger wrote:
OK, and the next next question: How many Starliner capsules is Boeing contracted to or expected to build?
SpaceX has already halted building new Crew Dragon 2's as the current fleet of four will suffice for current expected flight needs.
Tugg

They are all built. 4 Crew Dragon and 2 Starliner. That's what was needed to fulfill the contractual obligations. Each could build more if requested.
Starliner can turnaround faster since it doesn't land in water. Boeing was originally going to build 4 but decided 2 was enough.


You want to bet Starliner will turn around faster? They have about six times as much to replace as Dragon every flight.
The count sort of tells you the attitude of each company. SpaceX built one more than they needed for the NASA and private flights on their own dime to account for unexpected problems. Boeing built the bare minimum and will leave NASA hanging if anything goes wrong. SpaceX spending their own money to go above and beyond contract requirements is why they were able to make up for Boeing's mess in the first place.


As noted, SpaceX is being paid for the extra flights. I'm sure NASA is glad they were able to step up the flight frequency to make up for Boeing, as was the design intention, but I have no doubt Boeing would have done the same if the situation was reversed.

Starliner is designed to fly every six months and to be re-used 10 times, so it could in theory handle the scheduled crew rotations. But as NASA has stated, the intention is to have redundancy and alternate missions, with one per year for each vendor, with the other vendor having the ability to step up if something happens to the other's program.
 
User avatar
JetBuddy
Posts: 2860
Joined: Wed Dec 25, 2013 1:04 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Tue May 24, 2022 12:34 am

Thanks Avatar2go and Flyingturtle for your answers on cost. The figures were along the lines of what I thought.

I have a follow up question as well.

I heard that Starliner has the function of correcting ISS flight by using it's thrusters. The same as Soyuz can (but on their own docking ports). But SpaceX Crew Dragon doesn't have that option? What makes it so, is it to do with where they are docking on the station? Are they using different docking ports? I thought they were both using the International Docking Adapter.

I appreciate any responses.
 
Avatar2go
Posts: 950
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2022 3:41 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Tue May 24, 2022 3:02 am

JetBuddy wrote:
Thanks Avatar2go and Flyingturtle for your answers on cost. The figures were along the lines of what I thought.

I have a follow up question as well.

I heard that Starliner has the function of correcting ISS flight by using it's thrusters. The same as Soyuz can (but on their own docking ports). But SpaceX Crew Dragon doesn't have that option? What makes it so, is it to do with where they are docking on the station? Are they using different docking ports? I thought they were both using the International Docking Adapter.

I appreciate any responses.


Dragon has 16 Draco thrusters in the 100 lb class. Starliner has 28 thrusters in that class. These are for reaction control, but are suitable to boost the station at low delta-v.

Dragon also has 8 Super Draco thrusters in the 16,000 lb class, where as Starliner has 4 thrusters in the 40,000 lb class. But these are used for crew launch abort and are too powerful to be used for boosting the ISS. They are safed in orbit.

Finally Starliner has 20 OMAC thrusters in the 1,500 lb class. These could also potentially be used to boost the ISS, at high delta-v.

The Cygnus spacecraft has successfully boosted the ISS with its 100 lb class engine, as a test of capability, at very low delta-v.

Obviously one issue is that the thrusters have to be positioned behind the spacecraft, and only some of the thrusters for each are in the right orientation. Starliner has the service module which fulfils that purpose. Crew Dragon has to fire around the trunk, so would have some cosine losses.

Bottom line is that Starliner is better suited to the boosting task than Crew Dragon. But both spacecraft are capable in theory.
 
User avatar
kitplane01
Posts: 2479
Joined: Thu Jun 16, 2016 5:58 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Tue May 24, 2022 7:38 am

What fuel does the Starliner use. Not the launch vehicle,but the actual capsule? (Googling does not reveal an answer.)
 
Avatar2go
Posts: 950
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2022 3:41 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Tue May 24, 2022 9:43 am

kitplane01 wrote:
What fuel does the Starliner use. Not the launch vehicle,but the actual capsule? (Googling does not reveal an answer.)


Both commercial crew vehicles use hypergolic propellants, hydrazine fuel and nitrous tetroxide oxidizer. Crew Dragon has the 2 sets of Draco and Super Draco thrusters mounted in the capsule itself, with the trunk having no propulsion. Starliner has 4 sets of thrusters, 3 sets in the service module and 1 set in the capsule for re-entry.
 
User avatar
JetBuddy
Posts: 2860
Joined: Wed Dec 25, 2013 1:04 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Tue May 24, 2022 5:09 pm

Avatar2go wrote:
JetBuddy wrote:
Thanks Avatar2go and Flyingturtle for your answers on cost. The figures were along the lines of what I thought.

I have a follow up question as well.

I heard that Starliner has the function of correcting ISS flight by using it's thrusters. The same as Soyuz can (but on their own docking ports). But SpaceX Crew Dragon doesn't have that option? What makes it so, is it to do with where they are docking on the station? Are they using different docking ports? I thought they were both using the International Docking Adapter.

I appreciate any responses.


Dragon has 16 Draco thrusters in the 100 lb class. Starliner has 28 thrusters in that class. These are for reaction control, but are suitable to boost the station at low delta-v.

Dragon also has 8 Super Draco thrusters in the 16,000 lb class, where as Starliner has 4 thrusters in the 40,000 lb class. But these are used for crew launch abort and are too powerful to be used for boosting the ISS. They are safed in orbit.

Finally Starliner has 20 OMAC thrusters in the 1,500 lb class. These could also potentially be used to boost the ISS, at high delta-v.

The Cygnus spacecraft has successfully boosted the ISS with its 100 lb class engine, as a test of capability, at very low delta-v.

Obviously one issue is that the thrusters have to be positioned behind the spacecraft, and only some of the thrusters for each are in the right orientation. Starliner has the service module which fulfils that purpose. Crew Dragon has to fire around the trunk, so would have some cosine losses.

Bottom line is that Starliner is better suited to the boosting task than Crew Dragon. But both spacecraft are capable in theory.


Thank you, that is very informative!
 
Avatar2go
Posts: 950
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2022 3:41 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Tue May 24, 2022 11:57 pm

Starliner is loaded with 600 pounds of return ISS cargo, including nitrogen-oxygen recharge tanks, and the hatch is closed. Will depart Wednesday at 2:36 pm ET for re-entry and desert landing around 6:49 pm ET.
 
BEG2IAH
Posts: 1158
Joined: Thu Apr 22, 2004 3:42 pm

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Wed May 25, 2022 2:12 am

Hatch closed today at 2 pm. The return to Earth is tomorrow.

The spacecraft is scheduled to autonomously undock from the space station to begin the journey home at 2:36 p.m. EDT Wednesday, May 25. NASA and Boeing are targeting 6:49 p.m. for the landing and conclusion of OFT-2, wrapping up a six-day mission testing the end-to-end capabilities of the Starliner system.

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/cove ... n-to-earth
 
texl1649
Posts: 2206
Joined: Thu Aug 02, 2007 5:38 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Wed May 25, 2022 9:32 am

Avatar2go wrote:
kitplane01 wrote:
What fuel does the Starliner use. Not the launch vehicle,but the actual capsule? (Googling does not reveal an answer.)


Both commercial crew vehicles use hypergolic propellants, hydrazine fuel and nitrous tetroxide oxidizer. Crew Dragon has the 2 sets of Draco and Super Draco thrusters mounted in the capsule itself, with the trunk having no propulsion. Starliner has 4 sets of thrusters, 3 sets in the service module and 1 set in the capsule for re-entry.


Thanks again for your contributions to this thread. Very helpful!
 
User avatar
Nomadd
Posts: 628
Joined: Sat Dec 09, 2017 3:26 pm

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Wed May 25, 2022 4:59 pm

Avatar2go wrote:
Nomadd wrote:
Avatar2go wrote:
They are all built. 4 Crew Dragon and 2 Starliner. That's what was needed to fulfill the contractual obligations. Each could build more if requested.
Starliner can turnaround faster since it doesn't land in water. Boeing was originally going to build 4 but decided 2 was enough.


You want to bet Starliner will turn around faster? They have about six times as much to replace as Dragon every flight.
The count sort of tells you the attitude of each company. SpaceX built one more than they needed for the NASA and private flights on their own dime to account for unexpected problems. Boeing built the bare minimum and will leave NASA hanging if anything goes wrong. SpaceX spending their own money to go above and beyond contract requirements is why they were able to make up for Boeing's mess in the first place.


As noted, SpaceX is being paid for the extra flights. I'm sure NASA is glad they were able to step up the flight frequency to make up for Boeing, as was the design intention, but I have no doubt Boeing would have done the same if the situation was reversed.

Starliner is designed to fly every six months and to be re-used 10 times, so it could in theory handle the scheduled crew rotations. But as NASA has stated, the intention is to have redundancy and alternate missions, with one per year for each vendor, with the other vendor having the ability to step up if something happens to the other's program.

I'm not talking about SpaceX simply flying extra flights when Boeing couldn't do it. SpaceX actually built an extra capsule above the contract requirement on their own so they'd be ready for what happened. Boeing couldn't have done the same because they'd never consider spending their own money to to do the same.
 
GDB
Posts: 15371
Joined: Wed May 23, 2001 6:25 pm

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Wed May 25, 2022 5:16 pm

Nomadd wrote:
Avatar2go wrote:
Nomadd wrote:

You want to bet Starliner will turn around faster? They have about six times as much to replace as Dragon every flight.
The count sort of tells you the attitude of each company. SpaceX built one more than they needed for the NASA and private flights on their own dime to account for unexpected problems. Boeing built the bare minimum and will leave NASA hanging if anything goes wrong. SpaceX spending their own money to go above and beyond contract requirements is why they were able to make up for Boeing's mess in the first place.


As noted, SpaceX is being paid for the extra flights. I'm sure NASA is glad they were able to step up the flight frequency to make up for Boeing, as was the design intention, but I have no doubt Boeing would have done the same if the situation was reversed.

Starliner is designed to fly every six months and to be re-used 10 times, so it could in theory handle the scheduled crew rotations. But as NASA has stated, the intention is to have redundancy and alternate missions, with one per year for each vendor, with the other vendor having the ability to step up if something happens to the other's program.

I'm not talking about SpaceX simply flying extra flights when Boeing couldn't do it. SpaceX actually built an extra capsule above the contract requirement on their own so they'd be ready for what happened. Boeing couldn't have done the same because they'd never consider spending their own money to to do the same.


...Then those people from Axiom came along.
The Inspiration mission last year was rather overshadowed by the sub orbital Billionaire craft, a shame since it also demonstrated not only turn around of a Crew Dragon but also, with the hatch mod for the flight, versatility beyond the ISS crew rotation missions.
 
User avatar
Tugger
Topic Author
Posts: 11919
Joined: Tue Apr 18, 2006 8:38 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Wed May 25, 2022 7:06 pm

Starliner has departed the ISS.

Looking forward to a safe return to earth and successful mission completion.
Godspeed Starliner!

Tugg
 
Avatar2go
Posts: 950
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2022 3:41 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Wed May 25, 2022 7:39 pm

Nomadd wrote:
Avatar2go wrote:
Nomadd wrote:

You want to bet Starliner will turn around faster? They have about six times as much to replace as Dragon every flight.
The count sort of tells you the attitude of each company. SpaceX built one more than they needed for the NASA and private flights on their own dime to account for unexpected problems. Boeing built the bare minimum and will leave NASA hanging if anything goes wrong. SpaceX spending their own money to go above and beyond contract requirements is why they were able to make up for Boeing's mess in the first place.


As noted, SpaceX is being paid for the extra flights. I'm sure NASA is glad they were able to step up the flight frequency to make up for Boeing, as was the design intention, but I have no doubt Boeing would have done the same if the situation was reversed.

Starliner is designed to fly every six months and to be re-used 10 times, so it could in theory handle the scheduled crew rotations. But as NASA has stated, the intention is to have redundancy and alternate missions, with one per year for each vendor, with the other vendor having the ability to step up if something happens to the other's program.

I'm not talking about SpaceX simply flying extra flights when Boeing couldn't do it. SpaceX actually built an extra capsule above the contract requirement on their own so they'd be ready for what happened. Boeing couldn't have done the same because they'd never consider spending their own money to do the same.


Just to clarify, SpaceX was originally to construct 6 Crew Dragons, one for each contracted flight. After consultation with NASA, they agreed that the capsules could be refurbished and reused. That meant they needed at least 3 capsules to fulfill the contract, with no margin. The 4th capsule adds margin and will be needed by the contract extension to add 3 more missions. Also allows them to conduct commercial missions.

In contrast, Starliner was always intended to be re-used 10 times, with a 6-month turnaround, so that 2 capsules were enough to cover the contract, with margin. A third Starliner used for testing, was retired after the pad abort test.
 
Avatar2go
Posts: 950
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2022 3:41 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Wed May 25, 2022 10:55 pm

Starliner landed in New Mexico at 6:49 pm ET, after a successful mission to ISS. Nominal re-entry & landing. Post-mission conference at 9 pm ET tonight.
Last edited by Avatar2go on Wed May 25, 2022 11:12 pm, edited 2 times in total.
 
BEG2IAH
Posts: 1158
Joined: Thu Apr 22, 2004 3:42 pm

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Wed May 25, 2022 10:57 pm

The camera views were amazing! Congratulations, Boeing and NASA.
 
User avatar
JetBuddy
Posts: 2860
Joined: Wed Dec 25, 2013 1:04 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Thu May 26, 2022 12:21 am

Congrats Boeing!

Very interesting to see how different it is compared to the Crew Dragon.

I agree with BEG2IAH, the camera views including the infrared and heat signature was 10/10.
 
Avatar2go
Posts: 950
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2022 3:41 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Thu May 26, 2022 2:48 am

From the post-mission conference tonight, Starliner performed extremely well and accomplished all mission objectives. A few glitches but no show-stoppers that are likely to interfere with the CFT-1 flight late this year. NASA and Boeing will now review all the flight data prior to determining the schedule going forward.

After undocking, they test fired the 2 OMAC thrusters that had shutdown early after launch, and observed the same issue of partial thrust. So those thrusters were not used for the re-entry burn, but they got good engineering data. They also fired 6 of the RCS thrusters as a test of the 2 that had shutdown during the docking approach. All 6 thrusters functioned normally so they were all used in the re-entry maneuvers. Lastly they had one monopropellant RCS thruster on the capsule that appeared to have a marginal issue during descent. They will examine the data and the thruster itself to see what happened, but again there was redundancy so no threat to the mission.

They also had a momentary communications dropout from the Starliner on descent, as the antenna lost and then regained tracking of the satellite. They will look into that issue as well. Parachute and landing bag systems worked flawlessly. Starliner landed 3 tenths of a mile (one half km) from the target, which is considered excellent for a parachute landing from space.

ULA also published the Starliner orbital insertion accuracy plot for Atlas and Centaur. It was near-perfect, a bullseye on RAAN, inclination, and apogee, with only a small deviation on perigee. All done with an instantaneous launch window.
 
User avatar
Tugger
Topic Author
Posts: 11919
Joined: Tue Apr 18, 2006 8:38 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Thu May 26, 2022 3:36 am

No bounce house this time?
Image
Tugg
 
Avatar2go
Posts: 950
Joined: Thu Apr 14, 2022 3:41 am

Re: Boeing Starliner News and Discussion Thread

Thu May 26, 2022 4:03 am

Tugger wrote:
No bounce house this time?
Tugg


The shelter enclosure was there tonight, they had it deployed on the ground next to Starliner and ready. But the weather was good so didn't really need it. They will probably use it overnight.

For OFT-1, they landed in winter (16 degrees) and before sunrise, so wanted to shelter Starliner quickly.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 9 guests

Popular Searches On Airliners.net

Top Photos of Last:   24 Hours  •  48 Hours  •  7 Days  •  30 Days  •  180 Days  •  365 Days  •  All Time

Military Aircraft Every type from fighters to helicopters from air forces around the globe

Classic Airliners Props and jets from the good old days

Flight Decks Views from inside the cockpit

Aircraft Cabins Passenger cabin shots showing seat arrangements as well as cargo aircraft interior

Cargo Aircraft Pictures of great freighter aircraft

Government Aircraft Aircraft flying government officials

Helicopters Our large helicopter section. Both military and civil versions

Blimps / Airships Everything from the Goodyear blimp to the Zeppelin

Night Photos Beautiful shots taken while the sun is below the horizon

Accidents Accident, incident and crash related photos

Air to Air Photos taken by airborne photographers of airborne aircraft

Special Paint Schemes Aircraft painted in beautiful and original liveries

Airport Overviews Airport overviews from the air or ground

Tails and Winglets Tail and Winglet closeups with beautiful airline logos