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swabur
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Hangar And Hanger

Tue Mar 08, 2005 2:38 pm

I have noticed that a lot of people on a.net and in the aviation community for that matter have the misunderstanding that a building that an aircraft is parked in is a "hanger". No, a "hanger" is something you hang clothes on in your closet and a "hangar" is the building an aircraft is kept in. Just thought I'd bring it up. BTW has anyone else noticed this too?

Swabur
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Starlionblue
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RE: Hangar And Hanger

Tue Mar 08, 2005 3:13 pm

Hardly the only common spelling mistake but I agree with you.

There's also the classic "aircrafts" instead of "aircraft" and "complimentary" instead of "complementary" (no they're not the same).

Still, many of our members do not have English as their first language so it's quite forguvable not to write perfectly all the time.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
NKP S2
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RE: Hangar And Hanger

Tue Mar 08, 2005 3:16 pm

GRRRRRRR! Drives me up a wall....I have no idea why.

For better or worse, I end up making snap-judgements on a person's knowledge ( intellect really ) when I see it spelled with an "E" as referring to a building.

When moving into a brand new hangar some years back, I wryly pointed out to a manager where the LCD readout on the staus panel of the fire alarm/suppression system had the word "hanger" spelled out. His reply: "Oh yeah, that's an accepted alternate spelling of the word". Riiiiggggghhhtttt!

The inspiration to 'Dilbert'.
 
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RE: Hangar And Hanger

Tue Mar 08, 2005 3:20 pm

How about when the media write "Reverse thrusters" instead of Thrust Reversers?

Reverse thrusters sound like they belong on an Appollo command module or some undersea minisub explorer.
 
geoffm
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RE: Hangar And Hanger

Tue Mar 08, 2005 5:36 pm

PTV's, 747's, etc annoy me when used all the time. Who do they belong to? What are they abbreviating? Usually neither. Random Capitalisation really Annoys me Too. Lack of question marks at the end of a question. Grr!

Geoff M.
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Hangar And Hanger

Tue Mar 08, 2005 10:32 pm

Tires Tyres
Grey Gray
Airplane Aeroplane
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When We studied from UK & US Books,there was a confusion always.
regds
MEL
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NWOrientDC10
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RE: Hangar And Hanger

Tue Mar 08, 2005 11:58 pm

Throttle quadrant: I've heard this term referred to the throttles on aircraft with less than four engines, which to me is incorrect. On the other hand, I could be wrong. Maybe it's a carry over from the 707/DC-8 throttles.

Has anyone else noticed this?

(Geoffm - I hope this reply isn't too "grammatically incorrect" Big grin  Wink)

Take Care,

Russell
Things aren't always as they seem
 
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Starlionblue
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RE: Hangar And Hanger

Wed Mar 09, 2005 12:32 am

It's a throttle quadrant on any size plane. Quadrant refers to euclidian geometry, not "quad" as in four.
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
fewsolarge
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RE: Hangar And Hanger

Wed Mar 09, 2005 8:16 am

Sorry, but the quad in quadrant most certainly is from the Latin for four, not from Greek. Seen any tetragons lately?
 
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Starlionblue
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RE: Hangar And Hanger

Wed Mar 09, 2005 8:21 am

Sorry, but the quad in quadrant most certainly is from the Latin for four, not from Greek. Seen any tetragons lately?

Well, quad may come from latin, but quadrant is a common term in euclidian geometry, where the euclidian plane is divided into quadrants. In other words, it is the "quadrant", as in the zone, where the throttles are located.

http://www.pinkmonkey.com/studyguide...ubjects/algebra/chap8/a0808101.asp
"There are no stupid questions, but there are a lot of inquisitive idiots." - John Ringo
 
DC10GUY
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RE: Hangar And Hanger

Wed Mar 09, 2005 8:24 am

I worked in a HANGER for most of my aviation career .... We always spelled it B-A-R-N ....
Next time try the old "dirty Sanchez" She'll love it !!!
 
N766UA
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RE: Hangar And Hanger

Wed Mar 09, 2005 11:36 am

Yeah A for the building, E for the plastic triangle.
 
geoffm
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RE: Hangar And Hanger

Wed Mar 09, 2005 9:49 pm

Quoting NWOrientDC10 (Reply 6):
(Geoffm - I hope this reply isn't too "grammatically incorrect" )


Your post is fine!  Wink

(as opposed to "you're post is fine"...)

Geoff M.
 
SlamClick
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RE: Hangar And Hanger

Wed Mar 09, 2005 11:40 pm

Quoting NWOrientDC10 (Reply 6):
Throttle quadrant: I've heard this term referred to the throttles on aircraft with less than four engines, which to me is incorrect.


Or perhaps fewer than four engines.

Less = a quantity
Few = a number

Quadrant most certainly does refer to the geometric shape of the assembly in which the throttles (or even thrust levers) are mounted. It is, when viewed from the side, a segment of a circle.
Happiness is not seeing another trite Ste. Maarten photo all week long.
 
airplay
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RE: Hangar And Hanger

Thu Mar 10, 2005 7:29 am

Hangar comes from the French word for "shed". Many aviation terms come from the French.

The actual throttle "quadrant" is just one part of the entire assembly that the industry has, over time, wrongly called the throttle quadrant.

As mentioned, the quadrant is the semi-circle that is connected to the power lever. It translates the motion of the power lever to a control cable that varies the power of the engine.

Many large modern airplanes have no throttle "quadrant" as they use electronic means. The term "quadrant" is still used however.
 
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HAWK21M
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RE: Hangar And Hanger

Sat Mar 12, 2005 3:22 am

Quoting NWOrientDC10 (Reply 6):
Throttle quadrant

It refers to the Quadrant than transmits motion not as in 4.
regds
MEL
I may not win often, but I damn well never lose!!! ;)

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