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Braybuddy
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Ex-pats Voting

Sat May 05, 2007 8:25 pm

I was talking to a French friend last week who voted in the first round of the French presidential elections, and intends voting tomorrow. I said that I didn't agree with ex-pats having a vote (Irish people don't), for the simple reason that I don't believe you should have a say in the running of your country when you are not prepared to live there. He agreed, but it's not going to stop him voting.

If there's one thing the French and Americans have in common, it's this practice. How many other countries allow this? (I'm not talking about soldiers serving abroad, that is an entierly different matter and I believe they most definitely should have a vote).
 
allstarflyer
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RE: Ex-pats Voting

Sat May 05, 2007 8:32 pm

Quoting Braybuddy (Thread starter):
I didn't agree with ex-pats having a vote

How dare you - people Tony Eason and Irving Fryar have the right to vote as much as any of us!

-R
Living the American Dream
 
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Braybuddy
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RE: Ex-pats Voting

Sat May 05, 2007 9:12 pm

Quoting Allstarflyer (Reply 1):
Tony Eason and Irving Fryar

Who?????????????????
 
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B747-437B
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RE: Ex-pats Voting

Sat May 05, 2007 9:24 pm

Quoting Braybuddy (Thread starter):
I don't believe you should have a say in the running of your country when you are not prepared to live there

I disagree entirely. An expatriate is by definition a citizen who is temporarily domiciled elsewhere. The key difference between an expatriate and an immigrant is that the expatriate retains the intention to return to the home society, while an immigrant has the intention of integrating into the host society.

Expatriates are a very important segment of any society. They are the means by which societies expand their influence abroad and serve as important resources for inflows of expertise and assets. For example, I pay taxes in India, I invest in India, I own property in India and when I move back to India, I will bring with me international experience that can only serve India well. The politics and laws of India are hence very important to me and I make it a point to vote in every election that I practically can. As India does not offer absentee ballots, that often means having to fly halfway around the world to vote, but its a sacrifice I am willing to make.
Democracy In Action : 20000 Miles To Vote (w/pics) (by B747-437B May 24 2004 in Trip Reports)
 
BHXFAOTIPYYC
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RE: Ex-pats Voting

Sat May 05, 2007 9:55 pm

Quoting B747-437B (Reply 3):

Absolutely agree, and excellent post. If you are a citizen of a democratic nation, it should be your inalienable right to vote regardless of your domicile.

In the UK, Blair quietly reduced the ex-pat voting term from 20 to 15 years, I assume because he thought that most ex-pats are Tory voters.
Breakfast in BHX, lunch in FAO, dinner in TIP, baggage in YYC.
 
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Braybuddy
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RE: Ex-pats Voting

Sat May 05, 2007 10:03 pm

Quoting BHXFAOTIPYYC (Reply 4):
If you are a citizen of a democratic nation, it should be your inalienable right to vote regardless of your domicile.

We're in the middle of a general election here. I wouldn't want Irish people abroad having ANY say in who will form the next governnment when they will not have to suffer the consequences of their actions. Why should they?
 
JAL777
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RE: Ex-pats Voting

Sat May 05, 2007 10:06 pm

Quoting Braybuddy (Reply 5):
Why should they?

Because they're Irish.
 
ozglobal
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RE: Ex-pats Voting

Sat May 05, 2007 10:07 pm

As an Australian citizen abroad, I have the right to vote in Australian Federal and State Elections and will do so this year. If I obtain dual citizenship, I will have the right to vote in both countries. Any objections? I pay taxes (one primary, one secondary) in both countries and have investments in both economies.
When all's said and done, there'll be more said than done.
 
BHXFAOTIPYYC
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RE: Ex-pats Voting

Sat May 05, 2007 10:16 pm

Quoting Braybuddy (Reply 5):
they will not have to suffer the consequences of their actions.

You don't really think that people would deliberately vote for a particular party just to annoy the people back home do you? Even people who emigrate still usually have families and friends back home, and as has been said, if they are ex-pats then they'll be back. If they care enough to vote, chances are they can be responsible with that vote.

What are seem to be suggesting is a scenario for example where a million British ex-pats decided to vote for the Monster Raving Loony Party just for a laugh and to see what happens.
Breakfast in BHX, lunch in FAO, dinner in TIP, baggage in YYC.
 
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Braybuddy
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RE: Ex-pats Voting

Sat May 05, 2007 10:17 pm

Quoting JAL777 (Reply 6):
Because they're Irish.

So they could vote for the Republican Socialist Party or Sinn Fein in droves, put them in government, then sit back sipping their cocktails on some fabulous beach while the rest of us have to suffer their polices?

No thanks.
Nein danke.
No gracias
etc etc
 
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Braybuddy
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RE: Ex-pats Voting

Sat May 05, 2007 10:24 pm

Quoting BHXFAOTIPYYC (Reply 8):
You don't really think that people would deliberately vote for a particular party just to annoy the people back home do you?

Sorry, missed your post and didn't reply above. I doubt if most people would vote for a particularly idealistic party just to annoy people at home, but no doubt there would be some that do.

But it is very easy to be idealistic when you are not going to be affected by something personally.
 
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B747-437B
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RE: Ex-pats Voting

Sat May 05, 2007 11:47 pm

Quoting Braybuddy (Reply 10):
it is very easy to be idealistic when you are not going to be affected by something personally

Why on earth do you assume that expatriates are not affected personally by Government decisions? Issues such as taxation, foreign policy, social security, etc... are just as applicable, and in some cases more so, to expatriates as they are to citizens resident in country. Furthermore, and this shouldn't be taken the wrong way, expatriates tend to have higher levels of education than the population average, so their votes tend to be more informed than the partisan politics that often drive domestic agenda.

At the end of the day, it is very rare that expatriates have the ability to swing an election, primarily because their numbers are too few and a vast majority of them do not care to vote anyway. That said, their votes and opinions are no more or less valid than those of residents, just different.
 
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Braybuddy
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RE: Ex-pats Voting

Sun May 06, 2007 12:15 am

Quoting B747-437B (Reply 11):
Why on earth do you assume that expatriates are not affected personally by Government decisions? Issues such as taxation, foreign policy, social security, etc... are just as applicable

I don't know about India, but a lot of wealthy Irish people move abroad, or reside temporarily abroad, to avoid paying taxes. If they don't pay taxes to this country, and don't want to, why should they have ANY say in how the country is run? Unfortunately, these tax exiles retain the right to vote as they still remain citizens of the country. I believe this is wrong. Thankfully, other Irish people who move abroad do not.

Quoting B747-437B (Reply 11):
At the end of the day, it is very rare that expatriates have the ability to swing an election

That depends on the voting sytem, I suppose. We have proportional representation in this country, and a bone of contention with the main party in the just-dissolved government was that they missed winning the 2002 election by a couple of hundred votes. They had to form a coalition with a small party to form that government. PR is like that, and often who wins a onstituency can come down to a handful of votes.
 
rlwynn
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RE: Ex-pats Voting

Sun May 06, 2007 4:18 am

I think that living outside of home country really gives you a better view so how your country really is doing. At least that is how it is with me living outside of the USA. So when I vote it will be for what I see will be the best for America. Not just for the short term benefits that I would realize if I was living there.
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