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ALexeu
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Wed Jun 24, 2009 9:34 pm

What is the difference between:
-Highway
-Motorway
-Freeway
-Interstate

Thanks in advance!
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lincoln
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Wed Jun 24, 2009 10:08 pm



Quoting Klemmi85 (Reply 43):
Is there a website which tells me the fine I have to pay if I was to fast?

Using Google for phrases like "Florida Speeding Fine" will probably give you the best results, here's a privately-run (unofficial) result I found that includes a fine table:

http://www.dmvflorida.org/speeding-ticket.shtml

Generally speeding fines are graduated -- the faster you're going the more it costs you, and there reaches a point (usually 20 MPH over, some states more, some states less) where it's no longer considered "speeding" and instead "reckless driving", which can cary stiffer penalties and jail time.

In some places a "local surcharge" can be applied to the state fine.

If you leave Florida, be aware that the penalties and the point at which those penalties attach can varry significantly from state to state. For example, In California the last time I paid attention, the fine for parking in a disabled parking space was something like $321 statewide; in Ohio the fine for the same offence depends on what city you're in but is usually somewhere between $20 and $85

Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 45):
I think he meant that the two I-215's don't connect on their own - they're not the same highway, despite having the same name.

That's exactly what I meant, and I think it's still clear in when read in context... but perhaps "directly from one 215 to the other" would be more clear.
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PHLBOS
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Wed Jun 24, 2009 10:18 pm

Quoting Lincoln (Reply 42):
Although it's worth noting that this applies only to the 1- and 2- digit Interstates (5, 95, etc.) the 3-digit spurs and loops are frequently duplicated across the country -- For example, off the top of my head, I've driven on Interstate 215 in both California and Nevada... But you can't get from Nevada's I-215 to California's I-215. I'm also aware of at least two different I-480s (Ohio and Nebraska/Iowa, plus two more that were either planned and never built or built with different numbers (California and Pennsylvania)

There are also several I-495s (Massachusetts, New York, Delaware, Maryland/Virginia) that are separate from each other as well. At one time, there was even an I-495 segment in New Jersey (the Lincoln Tunnel) but that one was re-designated as State Route 495 years ago. Up until a few years ago, a sizable segment of the Maine Turnpike (the stretch that bypasses Portland) was designated I-495.

Nonetheless, there are also several 2-digit Interstates that bear the same number but are separate from each other (and no, these segments are not intended to be connected to each other via a highway bearing the same route number anytime soon).

I-76 exists in Colorado as well as Ohio, Pennsylvania & New Jersey (although most of these segements were once designated as I-80S).

I-84 exists in Oregon, Idaho & Utah (although it was originally known as I-80N until the late 70s/early 80s) as well as Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut & Massachusetts (some CT & MA stretches were at one time designated as I-86).

I-86 exists in Idaho (it was originally I-15W until the late 70s/early 80s) as well as Pennsylvania and New York (this was a recently-assigned designation along State Route 17). A segment of I-86 in Connecticut (east of Hartford) and the 7-mile Massachusetts stretch once existed but is now known as the eastern leg of fore-mentioned I-84.

I-88 exists in Illinois and New York.

And of course the I-35W & I-35E splits (form I-35) in MSP and DFW regions although those act more like the 3-digit Interstate varieties.

Quoting AlexEU (Reply 50):
What is the difference between:
-Highway
-Motorway
-Freeway
-Interstate

Highway is actually the most generic term from your list. In many instances, any type of road (not just ones carrying motor vehicles) can be referred to as highways. The word highway appears in the Bible many times.

2 examples from 2 different Bible translations:
Many are the victims she has brought down; her slain are a mighty throng.

Her house is a highway to the grave, leading down to the chambers of death.
Proverbs 7:26-27 NIV
_____________________________________________
How much better is it to get wisdom than gold! and to get understanding rather to be chosen than silver!

The highway of the upright is to depart from evil: he that keepeth his way preserveth his soul.

Pride goeth before destruction, and an haughty spirit before a fall.
Proverbs 16:16-18 KJV
_____________________________________________
Motorway narrows the highway definition down a bit to a road that is used primarily by motor vehicles.

Freeway is any limited-access divided highway that has no tolls.

An Interstate is a limited-access highway (it can be a toll road but most segments are freeways) that has the red, white & blue shield bearing the word INTERSTATE

Quoting Mayor (Reply 49):

Mayor, in this particular case, I believe that Vikkyvik is correct in interpreting Lincoln's question regarding separate 3-digit Interstate segments that bear the same number. I interpreted it and replied in a similar manner. 

[Edited 2009-06-24 15:32:59]
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BMI727
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Wed Jun 24, 2009 10:46 pm



Quoting PHLBOS (Reply 52):
Motorway narrows the highway definition down a bit to a road that is used primarily by motor vehicles.

Freeway is any limited-access divided highway that has no tolls.

An Interstate is a limited-access highway (it can be a toll road but most segments are freeways) that has the red, white & blue shield bearing the word INTERSTATE

Essentially, all interstates are freeways, and most freeways are interstates but not always. Physically, tollways, freeways and interstates are basically identical.

The term 'motorway' is rarely used in the US.
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 1:58 am



Quoting PHLBOS (Reply 52):
I-88 exists in Illinois and New York.

I didn't know that.....weird.......I-88 (West) used to be called the East-West Tollway until it was given the numerical designation, several years ago. It used to go from Hillside (IL) and ended at Illinois 47 at Sugar Grove. When it was extended to the Iowa border, it was given the I-88 designation. I daresay folks that are used to the East-West Tollway name still call it that.
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 3:38 am



Quoting BMI727 (Reply 38):
Technically it is not right,

True, but I don't think there's any state where passing in the right is expressly illegal. Most of the DMV driving booklets I've read just say something along the lines of "pass on the right with caution".

I have to do that all the time because of all the knuckleheads that love to do 20 under the limit in the LEFT lane, or those retards that drive in formation and block all lanes so you can't pass at all  banghead   biting   bomb   gnasher   headache   irked 
 
BMI727
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 4:09 am



Quoting FLY2HMO (Reply 55):
I have to do that all the time because of all the knuckleheads that love to do 20 under the limit in the LEFT lane, or those retards that drive in formation and block all lanes so you can't pass at all

And were just in the beginning of RV season.  banghead 
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vikkyvik
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 4:33 am



Quoting BMI727 (Reply 53):
Essentially, all interstates are freeways, and most freeways are interstates but not always. Physically, tollways, freeways and interstates are basically identical.

Well, if a freeway has no toll (as PHLBOS stated), then there are plenty of interstates that aren't freeways. Many interstates also function as turnpikes or other toll roads.
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mayor
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 4:37 am



Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 57):
Quoting BMI727 (Reply 53):
Essentially, all interstates are freeways, and most freeways are interstates but not always. Physically, tollways, freeways and interstates are basically identical.

Well, if a freeway has no toll (as PHLBOS stated), then there are plenty of interstates that aren't freeways. Many interstates also function as turnpikes or other toll roads.

I don't think BMI727 is correct. Virtually the entire interstate system around Chicago is tollway. Of course, it was only supposed to be tollway (or so the taxpayers were told) until it paid for itself. That was in 1959.

There is also I-44 thru TUL and OKC, the Turner Turnpike and the Will Rogers Turnpike, both tollways.
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BMI727
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 5:43 am



Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 57):
Well, if a freeway has no toll (as PHLBOS stated), then there are plenty of interstates that aren't freeways. Many interstates also function as turnpikes or other toll roads.

It must be a regional jargon thing. Around here freeway is not used as the opposite of a toll-way. Freeway is just another word for an interstate or expressway which may or may not be a tollway.

That is another thing that foreigners should be aware of. Each area has its own terminology for things. I have never met anyone from south of the Great Lakes who knows what a slough or a shelter belt is.
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vikkyvik
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 6:35 am



Quoting Mayor (Reply 58):

I don't think BMI727 is correct. Virtually the entire interstate system around Chicago is tollway. Of course, it was only supposed to be tollway (or so the taxpayers were told) until it paid for itself. That was in 1959.

Haha, not surprising.

Quoting BMI727 (Reply 59):
It must be a regional jargon thing. Around here freeway is not used as the opposite of a toll-way. Freeway is just another word for an interstate or expressway which may or may not be a tollway.

That is another thing that foreigners should be aware of. Each area has its own terminology for things. I have never met anyone from south of the Great Lakes who knows what a slough or a shelter belt is.

Very true. Everyone in the Los Angeles area refers to them (divided, limited access, high-speed multi-lane roads) as freeways. However, I grew up in the Boston area, where everyone calls them highways.
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BMI727
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 6:41 am



Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 60):
However, I grew up in the Boston area, where everyone calls them highways.

Out here a highway would be any road in a rural area. Except "the highway" which is understood to be the interstate that runs outside of town.
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PHLBOS
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 12:46 pm



Quoting FLY2HMO (Reply 55):
True, but I don't think there's any state where passing in the right is expressly illegal. Most of the DMV driving booklets I've read just say something along the lines of "pass on the right with caution".

It IS illegal to pass on the right in New Jersey; though that particular law isn't always enforced. There are signs at the northern end of the Garden State Parkway (facing southbounders coming from NY State) that state STATE LAW - PASS ON LEFT.

There may be one or two other states that have similar laws or at least laws regarding slow drivers riding in left-hand lanes.
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 2:39 pm

Quoting PHLBOS (Reply 62):
It IS illegal to pass on the right in New Jersey; though that particular law isn't always enforced. There are signs at the northern end of the Garden State Parkway (facing southbounders coming from NY State) that state STATE LAW - PASS ON LEFT.

There may be one or two other states that have similar laws or at least laws regarding slow drivers riding in left-hand lanes.

I would think it's a very difficult law to enforce. If there is slower traffic in the left lane and you're in the right and going faster than they are, is it really violating the law? Do you have to slow down to stay behind them? THAT would be absurd. In California there's such a thing as "impeding the flow of traffic" and that might be more applicable in this case.

In Europe, there is usually such good lane discipline that you don't run into these problems.

[Edited 2009-06-25 07:41:08]
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PHLBOS
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 3:37 pm



Quoting Mayor (Reply 63):
would think it's a very difficult law to enforce. If there is slower traffic in the left lane and you're in the right and going faster than they are, is it really violating the law?

It can be if there's a sign that states SLOWER TRAFFIC KEEP RIGHT placed along the road. I believe the Garden State Parkway and the New Jersey Turnpike has similar signs posted every now and then.
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 4:30 pm



Quoting PHLBOS (Reply 64):
It can be if there's a sign that states SLOWER TRAFFIC KEEP RIGHT placed along the road. I believe the Garden State Parkway and the New Jersey Turnpike has similar signs posted every now and then.

Then the slower traffic, that is blocking the left lane, is also violating the law.
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lincoln
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 4:57 pm



Quoting Mayor (Reply 63):
If there is slower traffic in the left lane and you're in the right and going faster than they are, is it really violating the law?



Quoting PHLBOS (Reply 64):
It can be if there's a sign that states SLOWER TRAFFIC KEEP RIGHT placed along the road.

I think the question was (and I could be incorrectly interperting it, of course)... If you're driving in the right lane, and you come upon a car in the left lane that is moving slower than you are is it violating the law to pass them? (that is, when you didn't make a lane change for the explicit purpose of passing the vehicle in the left lane)

It is very subjective and you get in to the whole "intent" thing (sure it's ovbious you're intending to pass a car if you're in the left lane, ride up on the car's bumper, then swerve in to the right lane, but if you're in the left lane, then a mile before you come upon the car change to the right lane were you still "intending" to pass the car, or were you merely exercising good/proper lane positioning?

Lincoln
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 5:30 pm



Quoting Lincoln (Reply 66):
I think the question was (and I could be incorrectly interperting it, of course)... If you're driving in the right lane, and you come upon a car in the left lane that is moving slower than you are is it violating the law to pass them? (that is, when you didn't make a lane change for the explicit purpose of passing the vehicle in the left lane)

 checkmark   checkmark  That's exactly what I was getting at.



I ran into a problem on the Autobahn in '87 that comes into the whole "lane discipline" thing. It was a 4 lane (two in each direction) autobahn and I had a Ford Fiesta, 4 speed. For me to use the left lane, I was probably going as fast as I could, which was still not as fast as some of the other traffic in the left lane. I would have to move over, between the trucks and slow down until the faster traffic was past and then move back over to the left. As you can imagine, I spent much of the time moving back and forth and it really was not a good driving experience.
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klemmi85
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 6:05 pm



Quoting Mayor (Reply 67):
and I had a Ford Fiesta



Quoting Mayor (Reply 67):
I spent much of the time moving back and forth and it really was not a good driving experience.

Totally normal here... Either your car is capable of "flowing" with the traffic or you jam everything up. You need to do some very adapted driving here in Germany. During some hours, when I drive home from work, the left lane travels with an average of 160km/h. Sometimes around 140, sometimes around 180. So with a Fiesta, you certainly can not do well on the left lane. On our Autobahnen with 3 lanes per direction, it's better though. You have a slow lane on the right with all the trucks, a medium speed lane in the middle where everything from 110km/h - 130km/h can be found and you have the left lane with traffic passing by up to the cars max. speed.

This is the point where I like to point out, that both systems have advantages and disadvantages. In the US for example, I'm always cool in the car. Traffic is more or less doing equal speed on the interstate, no extrema found. On the other side, although the roads are big and long and you could rev it up to save some time, you're locked at the 75/80mph speed limit.

On the other side, you have the german system... I argue very often about other drivers mainly because of these big discrepancies in speed. You have a two lane Autobahn for example, doing 200-250km/h and occupy the left lane. On the right side are trucks and slow driving vehicles. Every now and then someone just pulls over regardless of whats coming from behind. They either don't care or can't judge the speed you are approaching with. Either way, you're forced to kick the brakes BUT for what? I could have passed one or two seconds later and behing me was nothing. Why couldn't he wait that one or two seconds? I never get to it and if I had the right to do so, I'd let him know about how pissed I am about that behaviour. So the driving here is more stress and anger than in the US. Positive thing is that you can go as fast as you want unless you're heading thorugh an area of speed restrictions.
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PHLBOS
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 7:06 pm



Quoting Lincoln (Reply 66):
If you're driving in the right lane, and you come upon a car in the left lane that is moving slower than you are is it violating the law to pass them? (that is, when you didn't make a lane change for the explicit purpose of passing the vehicle in the left lane)

If there's a sign along the road that reads KEEP RIGHT PASS LEFT (I've seen many of these signs in New Jersey); then, yes, passing a slow moving left-lane vehicle on the right is a violation.
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ALexeu
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 7:23 pm

LOL, I am a road geek !

Quoting PHLBOS (Reply 52):
Highway is actually the most generic term from your list. In many instances, any type of road (not just ones carrying motor vehicles) can be referred to as highways. The word highway appears in the Bible many times.

Thanks for explanation. In Europe we have a different classification for roads.

Quoting PHLBOS (Reply 52):
Motorway narrows the highway definition down a bit to a road that is used primarily by motor vehicles.

This is the motorway sign in Europe. It basically means a road where bicycles and other non-powered vehicles are banned. However, in UK, motorways are same as highways.
In many European countries, motorway is called ''road reserved for motor vehicles''.


Quoting PHLBOS (Reply 52):
Freeway is any limited-access divided highway that has no tolls.

How are ordinary roads classified in USA? Such as one-lane roads connecting towns.

Alex
 
BMI727
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 7:52 pm



Quoting AlexEU (Reply 70):
How are ordinary roads classified in USA? Such as one-lane roads connecting towns.

Those are usually state routes, which are numbered by a system in each state. In Illinois for example, state roads 17 and 18 run parallel to each other about 10 or so miles apart, doing away with the even is east/west and odd for north/south.

Other of the backroads are county roads. These are numbered too, but in practice, everyone knows where they are going and pay no attention to signs which are few and far between. For someone unfamiliar with the area, it would be best to stick with interstates and state roads. Another thing that is common around here is the county roads are sometimes known by a name based on where they go, practically doing away with the numbers completely. Talk about "Evans Road" or "Washburn blacktop" and people will know what you mean, but saying something like "county road 9000 north" would draw a blank stare.

Also, around here most of the roads are remarkable straight, but have occasional s-turns in the middle of nowhere. Most of the roads were laid out to follow lines of lattitude or longitude and the s-curves are to compensate for the curvature of the earth.
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vikkyvik
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 8:09 pm



Quoting BMI727 (Reply 71):
Other of the backroads are county roads. These are numbered too, but in practice, everyone knows where they are going and pay no attention to signs which are few and far between. For someone unfamiliar with the area, it would be best to stick with interstates and state roads. Another thing that is common around here is the county roads are sometimes known by a name based on where they go, practically doing away with the numbers completely. Talk about "Evans Road" or "Washburn blacktop" and people will know what you mean, but saying something like "county road 9000 north" would draw a blank stare.

Another one that's dependent on region. In New England, I don't think I've ever seen a county road or route. Most local roads are town roads (and many of them change names as they go through different towns).

Many of the state routes simply follow these town roads. Or they go from one town road to another. A good example is MA-62, which in the course of about 10 miles, goes along the following roads:

(starting in Wilmington, MA)
Middlesex Ave
Church St
Burlington Ave
(crossing into Burlington, MA)
Wilmington Rd
Cambridge St
Francis Wyman Rd
Bedford St
(crossing into Bedford, MA)
Burlington Rd
Old Billerica Rd
Page Rd
Brooksbie Rd
Great Rd
Concord Rd
(crossing into Concord, MA)
Bedford St
etc.....

Makes it interesting, to say the least. Keep an eye on the signs!
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BMI727
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 8:16 pm



Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 72):
I don't think I've ever seen a county road or route. Most local roads are town roads (and many of them change names as they go through different towns).

That happens here too. A state route will go through a town and be designated as just a normal street. Also, a state route may skip or jump through a town as well. Sometimes there are signs noting this and sometimes there aren't so one must be a bit careful.
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PHLBOS
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 9:32 pm



Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 72):
In New England, I don't think I've ever seen a county road or route. Most local roads are town roads (and many of them change names as they go through different towns).

County routes (or route numbers) not existing in New England... correct.

But that doesn't mean there aren't any county roads. Having worked at a land surveying/civil engineering office in Danvers, Massachusetts during the very early part of my engineering career; I can tell you that there were many major roads (usually older roads and not divided highways mind you) that were originally designed and layed out by the county. Many segments of state routes in Massachusetts are on county roads.

Many of those street segments in your Rte. 62 example are probably Middlesex County roads; if one checked through the applicable survey documents.
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vikkyvik
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Thu Jun 25, 2009 11:06 pm



Quoting PHLBOS (Reply 74):
But that doesn't mean there aren't any county roads. Having worked at a land surveying/civil engineering office in Danvers, Massachusetts during the very early part of my engineering career; I can tell you that there were many major roads (usually older roads and not divided highways mind you) that were originally designed and layed out by the county. Many segments of state routes in Massachusetts are on county roads.

Many of those street segments in your Rte. 62 example are probably Middlesex County roads; if one checked through the applicable survey documents.

That's actually quite interesting.

However, I do wonder, while they may have originally been county roads, are the local towns/cities are now responsible for maintaining them (or perhaps they were in the first place, like how federal interstates are maintained by the individual states)?

I'm pretty sure that Middlesex County, at least, has been rather bankrupt for a number of years  Smile
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PHLBOS
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Fri Jun 26, 2009 5:42 pm



Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 75):
However, I do wonder, while they may have originally been county roads, are the local towns/cities are now responsible for maintaining them (or perhaps they were in the first place, like how federal interstates are maintained by the individual states)?

That's probably the case, unless the state takes over and upgrades certain sections.
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lincoln
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Fri Jun 26, 2009 6:07 pm



Quoting Vikkyvik (Reply 75):
However, I do wonder, while they may have originally been county roads, are the local towns/cities are now responsible for maintaining them (or perhaps they were in the first place, like how federal interstates are maintained by the individual states)?

I'm sure it depends on the state and the political motivations.

In Ohio all of the state routes that I know of are mantained by the state -- come winter time there can be some fairly ovbious differences as far as snow plowing goes!

In Calfiornia, by default state highways/state routes are mantained by the state (CalTrans), however, municipalities can "apply" to take over sections of the highway within their jurisdiction -- the advantage to this is that they are then able to exercise more control over things like traffic signal timing to better match everything else in the city -- this became a huge issue in the city I grew up in.

I beleive, though, if the municipality fails to mantain it to CalTrans standards then CalTrans takes back over.
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luckyone
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RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Fri Jun 26, 2009 8:44 pm



Quoting TZ757300 (Reply 7):
Not at all. It's actually the opposite for US routes. Lowest odd numbers are in the east and increase to the west. Example being US 1 on the East Coast to US 101 on the west coast. Lowest even numbers US routes start in the North and increase going South.

Not necessarily, for instance, US 441 runs through Florida, Georgia and up through the Carolinas.

Quoting Mayor (Reply 14):
Some southern cities (Fort Smith and Shreveport come to mind) have streets that seemingly end, only to start up again, several blocks later with the same name. Makes things very confusing, especially if you're new in town.

Even worse when you have a city like Atlanta -- every second road has Peachtree in it.

For example...
Peachtree Street,Peachtree Circle, Peachtree Place, Peachtree Lane, Peachtree Road, Peachtree Parkway, Peachtree Run, Peachtree Trace, Peachtree Ave, Peachtree Commons, Peachtree Battle, Peachtree Corners, New Peachtree, Old Peachtree, West Peachtree, Peachtree-Dunwoody, Peachtree-Chamblee, or Peachtree Industrial Boulevard.

Interestingly, you'll find a difference in how roads are referred to as between East and West Coasts. On the West coast (and in Phoenix) major roads are referred to with the article "the". Eg, "The 10", "The 405", etc, etc. Whereas on in the east-cost it would be "I-85, I-95", or just "85" and "95". It tripped me out when I was watching Designing Women (yeah, yeah, yeah) and Mary Jo was complaining about how she had "..crawled down THE 285!" Nobody here would call it THE 285!
 
vikkyvik
Posts: 12565
Joined: Thu Jul 31, 2003 1:58 pm

RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Fri Jun 26, 2009 8:56 pm



Quoting Luckyone (Reply 78):
Interestingly, you'll find a difference in how roads are referred to as between East and West Coasts. On the West coast (and in Phoenix) major roads are referred to with the article "the". Eg, "The 10", "The 405", etc, etc. Whereas on in the east-cost it would be "I-85, I-95", or just "85" and "95". It tripped me out when I was watching Designing Women (yeah, yeah, yeah) and Mary Jo was complaining about how she had "..crawled down THE 285!" Nobody here would call it THE 285!

Haha, so true.

And someone like me, who grew up in MA but lives in CA...I use both. When I'm in CA, I say "the 10". When I'm in MA, I say "95" or "I-95".

Quoting Luckyone (Reply 78):
Not necessarily, for instance, US 441 runs through Florida, Georgia and up through the Carolinas.

To be fair, US-441 is a spur off of US-41. While US-41 is quite far east at its southern end, up north, it goes up to Michigan's upper Peninsula - quite far west of US-1.
I'm watching Jeopardy. The category is worst Madonna songs. "This one from 1987 is terrible".
 
PHLBOS
Posts: 6520
Joined: Thu Apr 01, 2004 6:38 am

RE: Infrastructure Question About The USA

Fri Jun 26, 2009 8:57 pm



Quoting Luckyone (Reply 78):
Quoting TZ757300 (Reply 7):
Not at all. It's actually the opposite for US routes. Lowest odd numbers are in the east and increase to the west. Example being US 1 on the East Coast to US 101 on the west coast. Lowest even numbers US routes start in the North and increase going South.

Not necessarily, for instance, US 441 runs through Florida, Georgia and up through the Carolinas.

My earlier post on this matter should clarify this:

Quoting PHLBOS (Reply 30):
101 is being used at the high end (>99); that's why it's located along the West Coast.

Other 3-digit US routes (102 and higher) are usually placed in states that also have a 1 or 2-digit US route whose number matches the 2nd and 3rd digit of the fore-mentioned 3-digit route.

In the case of your US 441 example: it was designated as such because US 41 ALSO runs through Florida and Georgia.
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