RNOcommctr
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What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 2:33 am

Getting close to my 30 years at RNO and it's time for this old geezer and his wife to begin thinking of relocation to somewhere warmer. I'm looking for a U.S. city or region with these climatic characteristics:

January average high temperature: More than 50 degrees F.
July average high temperature: Less than 90 degrees F.

I've spent a lot of time looking at weather statistics and the Atlanta, GA area heading northeast to Greenville, SC seems to come pretty close. Obviously, some areas of California meet these criteria but the cost of living is out of my reach.

Precipitation and humidity aren't major concerns.

Thanks in advance for the help.
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lowrider
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 2:46 am

Have you looked at Knoxville, TN and the surrounding area?

www.city-data.com has a lot of good data, as well as a forum for asking questions.
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Continental
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 2:52 am

Chattanooga, TN seems to be rather close to fitting your preferences. The area is gorgeous, and I believe it's pretty cheap over there.
 
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STT757
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 3:14 am



Quoting RNOcommctr (Thread starter):
I've spent a lot of time looking at weather statistics and the Atlanta, GA area heading northeast to Greenville, SC seems to come pretty close.

After spending a month in Georgia this past August I implore you to think twice, while the temperatures might not reach the heights they do in places like Nevada, Arizona and Southern California the humidity is absolutely oppressive. It will drain you, and you will never want to go outside in the Summer. Being from Reno your not going to understand just how bad the humidity can get back East.
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NIKV69
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 3:16 am

San Diego always right around 75F!
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tb727
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 3:34 am



Quoting Continental (Reply 2):
Chattanooga, TN seems to be rather close to fitting your preferences. The area is gorgeous, and I believe it's pretty cheap over there.

I second Eastern TN. I've spent a lot of time in Morristown and everyone there is pretty nice and it's not far from Knoxville which has everything big city wise.

The Gulf Coast is pretty nice too most of the time if you like being near the water.
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Flighty
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 3:57 am



Quoting NIKV69 (Reply 4):
San Diego always right around 75F!

Yeah California is wonderful, but real estate in Santa Barbara or SD is going to be so expensive. We might as well add, Honolulu meets the requirement  
 
PacNWjet
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 4:01 am

Short answer: Hawaii

Every month is above 50. Despite what one might believe, Hawaii is cooler than many spots in the mainland U.S. in the summer because of the tradewinds and the ocean breeze. Many places in Hawaii don't see temps over 90 throughout the summer.

On the other hand, if certain places in California are out of your price range, Hawaii also might not be an option since the cost of living there is quite high.
 
ltbewr
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 4:16 am

How about certain areas of Oregon and Washington State? Maybe a little wet, but areas within reasonable range of the coast are rarely below freezing or above 90 F.
 
JBirdAV8r
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 4:23 am



Quoting Tb727 (Reply 5):
I second Eastern TN. I've spent a lot of time in Morristown and everyone there is pretty nice and it's not far from Knoxville which has everything big city wise.

Wow, all these people with good taste! East TN born and raised--in Johnson City. It's close enough to bigger cities (Knoxville), "culture" (Asheville), good airport for the kids to come visit (TRI, with AVL and TYS within easy reach). It'll be a little shy of your average temps greater than 50 degrees in January though, but generally not by much. I say that as there's 8 inches of snow in my front yard, but that's fairly rare.

I'd look a little bit at the coastal areas, namely Charleston, SC. That close to the coast it gets hot and sticky in the summer, but rarely above 90 and most of the time in the mid-80s. Houses are cheap, new (or "historic" too if that floats your boat) and plentiful.
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Yellowstone
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 4:32 am

If you're willing to be a bit flexible on the lower end of that range (average January temp is 45, rather than 50), you might be interested in Sequim, WA. It's in a rain shadow, so it only gets about 15 or so inches of precipitation annually. The average high in July and August is 69 degrees. The area is becoming more popular for retirees, so there are a lot of resources out there for people wanting to retire to that area. Not coincidentally, my parents retired up there a few years ago. Property values aren't bad either, though your opinion of that coming from Reno may be different than mine coming from Silicon Valley.
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PPVRA
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 4:42 am

Quoting RNOcommctr (Thread starter):
I've spent a lot of time looking at weather statistics and the Atlanta, GA area heading northeast to Greenville, SC seems to come pretty close.

Aside from the humidity, it does go below freezing here in Atlanta too. Though usually it's a few days here and there, not constantly.

[Edited 2010-01-31 21:02:24]
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baroque
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 4:49 am



Quoting Continental (Reply 2):
Chattanooga, TN seems to be rather close to fitting your preferences. The area is gorgeous, and I believe it's pretty cheap over there.

Buy a large area with Chatanooga shale underneath and you should make a fortune in oil from the shale, oh in about 2150.  angel  Meanwhile, you could mine it on a small scale and sell it as specimens of Chat - in great demand around the world it is. 200 gms at a time too.
 
texan
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 4:51 am

The Hill Country in and around Austin is gorgeous. High temps are usually above 50 in the winter, although expect 1-2 short lived snow/ice storms per season (snow/ice storm in Central, North, and South Texas is defined as more than 1" of snow or any ice). Summer is hot, but it is gorgeous. Barton Springs is right close, Lake Travis and the Colorado River are there . . . Austin is a great place to be. Keep Austin Weird!

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TSS
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 5:12 am



Quoting STT757 (Reply 3):
Quoting RNOcommctr (Thread starter):
I've spent a lot of time looking at weather statistics and the Atlanta, GA area heading northeast to Greenville, SC seems to come pretty close.

After spending a month in Georgia this past August I implore you to think twice, while the temperatures might not reach the heights they do in places like Nevada, Arizona and Southern California the humidity is absolutely oppressive. It will drain you, and you will never want to go outside in the Summer. Being from Reno you're not going to understand just how bad the humidity can get back East.

After spending 40 of the last 43 years in Birmingham, Alabama (which has exactly the same weather as Atlanta except it occurs here 6-24 hours earlier), I must strongly agree. Although the average temperature here is somewhat warmer in the winter than in Reno, the summertime humidity here is nothing short of stupendous and must be experienced to be believed. Also, our daytime/nighttime temperature variance is usually only 15-20 degrees and the humidity doesn't let up at night, so a sweltering 95 degree day at 85% humidity is followed by an 80 degree night at 90% humidity. To summarize, here it's like a sauna in the summer and it's every bit as hot in the shade as it is in the direct sunlight.
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Natesantiago88
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 5:46 am

Columbia South Carolina. Nice mild weather year around. The city is growing, plenty of jobs in the area. If you travel a lot up and down the east coast it's a good middle point. 10 hours to MIA, 10 hours to NYC. You are inland, but the beach is about 1.5 hours away. It's a great place. My sister moved there after she got married and it's great.
 
RNOcommctr
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 6:17 am

Thanks for all the thoughtful, helpful replies so far.

We had originally looked at San Antonio. Seems like it gets pretty hot in the summer. Then started to look a little further north in Hill Country and was impressed with what we saw. Perhaps it is just a bit cooler in Hill Country than in San Antonio or Austin?

I've been in Tennessee and loved it but unfortunately the winters are a bit cold for me. Gorgeous in the hills above Sevierville and Gatlinburg.

I also like the suggestion of Colimbia, SC.

Any other ideas are greatly appreciated!
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N1120A
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 6:42 am



Quoting RNOcommctr (Thread starter):
January average high temperature: More than 50 degrees F.
July average high temperature: Less than 90 degrees F.



Quoting RNOcommctr (Thread starter):
I've spent a lot of time looking at weather statistics and the Atlanta, GA area heading northeast to Greenville, SC seems to come pretty close.

Greenville is the home of Bob Jones University, so your religious proclivities might play into that decision. Also, while the average in the summer in many of those Southern cities may seem reasonably low, the humidity will send the heat index soaring WAY above it. It will make the summers in Reno seem cool by comparison, even when they are 15 degrees hotter.

Honestly, if you are completely unconcerned about humidity, may I recommend New Orleans. Reasonable cost of living, lots to do, great culture/food, solid airport (despite the rumblings for more service) and much more interesting than one of these newer places.

Quoting RNOcommctr (Thread starter):
Obviously, some areas of California meet these criteria but the cost of living is out of my reach.

Too bad, because we really do have the best weather. Also, have you tried perhaps looking a bit deeper? For example, you could get a really nice condo in Long Beach for a very reasonable price.

Quoting LTBEWR (Reply 8):
How about certain areas of Oregon and Washington State? Maybe a little wet, but areas within reasonable range of the coast are rarely below freezing or above 90 F.

Portland is definitely somewhere to consider. Great public transport, reasonable cost of living, nice weather outside the rain.

Also, what about Denver? Aside from a few really cold days, it is really has a wonderful climate and excellent cost and standard of living.
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dxing
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 8:46 am



Quoting N1120A (Reply 17):
Honestly, if you are completely unconcerned about humidity

Let me say, after living a summer in New Orleans, you have to be absolutely unconcerned about humidity to live there. Best to set your auto up so it can be remote started from inside your home so the ac is pumping out the cool air before you get out to it.

Quoting N1120A (Reply 17):
Too bad, because we really do have the best weather

Lately? Then of course in the summer you have that nagging suspicion that you are one lightening strike or firebug away from being burned out. Or that the big one may strike at any momnent. CA is a nice place to visit as they say....

The hill country of Texas is hot in the summer time, the elevation change is not great enough to cool the air that much.

As to your criteria:

Quoting RNOcommctr (Thread starter):
January average high temperature: More than 50 degrees F.
July average high temperature: Less than 90 degrees F

That's going to be a tough bill to fit. My guess is that you are going to have to look at someplace near a large body of water that will help to regulate the temperature. Getting close to the water will increase the humidity but if that doesn't concern you then it doesn't fall into the problem bucket.

I would second or third the opinions that if you have never experienced a deep south summer, you should try before you buy. The heat and humidity can be extremely oppressive for days on end. Much worse than the dry heat you get in Reno. At least there you have the relief of the Sierra's nearby. Very few mountain ranges (if you can call them that) in the east are going to match that.

Depending on how rural you want to be Pine Mountain in western Georgia might do you. Or anywhere near Dahlonega, Georgia. Of course there are always Augusta Georgia and Greenville-Spartanburg, South Carolina. I've always had my eye on Savannah Georgia and Tybee Island myself. I've always been a fan of Destin, Florida in the panhandle as well. Good luck and good hunting.
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seb146
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 5:20 pm



Quoting LTBEWR (Reply 8):
How about certain areas of Oregon and Washington State? Maybe a little wet, but areas within reasonable range of the coast are rarely below freezing or above 90 F.

The Valley would be okay. Vancouver, Washington; Salem, Eugene, Albany Oregon. Portland gets this wierd ice zone thing in the winter. If I were to recommend the Portland area, it would be either the far south or far west suburbs since the east and central parts of the city get more ice. Also, Roseburg and Medford areas are in valleys, so they get snow, fog, and temperature inversions. The east side of the state has gotten bitterly cold in years past. Brookings usually gets warm first. It is on the coast, but faces southwest and is about 10 miles from the California boarder.

Someone mentioned Squim. Bremerton and Bainbridge I always thought were nice, too, as far as climate. Bainbridge is more expensive, though.
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TSS
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 5:22 pm



Quoting DXing (Reply 18):
I've always had my eye on Savannah Georgia and Tybee Island myself.

Savannah Georgia is the only place I've lived apart from Birmingham, and I don't know why I didn't suggest that in my earlier post. Chalk it up to lack of sleep yesterday, I suppose.  blush 

Savannah has a wonderful climate: Much warmer than Birmingham in the winter, and there's always a breeze to keep the humidity from being oppressive during the summer.

The only drawbacks to Savannah are these:
1. The rain- When it rains in Savannah, it doesn't play around. If there's a 50% chance of rain in Reno, that means that there is a 50% chance that there will be any measurable precipitation at all anywhere in the Truckee Meadows. When there's a 50% chance of rain in Savannah, that means that for 12 of the next 24 hours it's going to be raining like pouring pis... *ahem*... water out of a boot, usually in 15-30 separate showers alternating with periods of bright sunshine. The locals are used to this and don't let the rain impede their activities, reasoning quite accurately that "If it's raining now, that means it won't be by the time we get where we're going".
2. The hurricanes- Every hurricane that forms off the coast of Africa begins it's trek across the Atlantic headed straight for Savannah, and then sooner or later veers off to the North or South. Many, many times in Savannah the National Weather Service will call for evacuation of the islands and boarding-up of local homes and businesses only to have the expected hurricane either fizzle out or go elsewhere, and Savannah won't even get any rain on the day the hurricane hits. After living in Savannah and hearing "Wolf!" cried over hurricanes so many times, I understood perfectly why so few New Orleans residents had evacuated that city before Hurricane Katrina hit.

Tybee Island is indeed beautiful, but it's subject to frequent evacuations and any serious grocery shopping you'd need to do requires a 15 mile trip inland to Savannah unless you want to pay tourist prices.

RNOcommctr, I'd suggest you spend a week or two's vacation in Savannah and see what you think of the place. You might find it fits your criteria quite well. 
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luckyone
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 5:33 pm



Quoting PPVRA (Reply 11):
Aside from the humidity, it does go below freezing here in Atlanta too. Though usually it's a few days here and there, not constantly.

And the last two winters have been frigid for Atlanta standards. I don't think it got above 45 for most of November and all of December. Contrast that with two years ago December 15 it was 81 degrees F!!!! The winter weather is very unpredictable, and in my lifetime at least we get our nastiest weather in late February/early March.

Mid July to August, as someone else said, can be just outright oppressive. I grew up with it so the humidity doesn't really bother me, but you still don't do much outside in the middle of the day. This past July we had two straight weeks of 95+ temperatures, with almost every day going over 100 before heat index. Heat index we were pushing 110. Needless to say, NOBODY went outside. The flipside is everybody is well prepared for it and everywhere you go is air conditioned. Just make sure you have a sun guard to put in your windshield because your car becomes an oven after just an hour in the summer sun!

I've lived in Atlanta, Middle Georgia, and North Georgia (as in the state line went through the lake that my house was on about 100 yards out) about one hour from Greenville. The farther away from Atlanta and closer to Greenville (about 120 miles from Atlanta proper) you get the lifestyle and traffic becomes slower and less hectic. It depends what you're looking for. A lot of people retire on Lake Hartwell and Lake Keowee and Lake Russell. The weather however, is the same in just about all of those places.
 
N1120A
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 6:27 pm



Quoting DXing (Reply 18):

Let me say, after living a summer in New Orleans, you have to be absolutely unconcerned about humidity to live there.

This is absolutely true. The OP said he is unconcerned with humidity, but I think living in Reno has given him a skewed sense of humidity. Then again, Houston is just as bad.

Quoting DXing (Reply 18):
Then of course in the summer you have that nagging suspicion that you are one lightening strike or firebug away from being burned out.

1) It is, sadly, almost always the former that causes it. Either that, or an idiot with a campfire.

2) Less expensive real estate generally isn't threatened by fire.
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lowrider
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 7:28 pm

How about Wilmington, NC? It might be pushing the upper limit on temperature a little, but other than that I think it would be close. Depending on the margin of error you are willing to tolerate on temperature, anywhere on the east coast from there up to Cape May, NJ might fit.
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STT757
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 7:31 pm



Quoting TSS (Reply 14):
After spending 40 of the last 43 years in Birmingham, Alabama (which has exactly the same weather as Atlanta except it occurs here 6-24 hours earlier), I must strongly agree. Although the average temperature here is somewhat warmer in the winter than in Reno, the summertime humidity here is nothing short of stupendous and must be experienced to be believed. Also, our daytime/nighttime temperature variance is usually only 15-20 degrees and the humidity doesn't let up at night, so a sweltering 95 degree day at 85% humidity is followed by an 80 degree night at 90% humidity. To summarize, here it's like a sauna in the summer and it's every bit as hot in the shade as it is in the direct sunlight.

I couldn't get over how uncomfortble it was even at 5Am in the morning, we would have black flag conditions (no outdoor PT) by 11Am. And when I was there in August we had that tropical storm/depression roll through, I've never experienced anything like it. On the weekends we drove down to Florida (Flagler Beach). It was significantly more comfotable in Florida, must have been the Ocean breezes.
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travelin man
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Mon Feb 01, 2010 7:54 pm



Quoting RNOcommctr (Reply 16):
We had originally looked at San Antonio. Seems like it gets pretty hot in the summer. Then started to look a little further north in Hill Country and was impressed with what we saw. Perhaps it is just a bit cooler in Hill Country than in San Antonio or Austin?

I was in Waco for four years (about 90 minutes north of Austin). The Winters were OK, but the Summers are completely oppressive. If you don't want temps >90s, you'll have to look elsewhere. They often get consecutive days of 100+ temperatures, and when you add in the humidity it can be unbearable.

That said, I absolutely love Austin, and think it would be a great place to live if you didn't have temperature constraints.
 
exFATboy
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Tue Feb 02, 2010 12:44 am

As someone who moved from Fresno to Tampa at one point, I really urge you to consider humidity. My experience was that Fresno at 105 was slightly more comfortable than Tampa at 85-90. To really get a feel for how this will affect you (or not), you really need to live in it a couple of months, if you're like me a few days is OK but it really wears on you after a month or two of no relief (or staying indoors all summer.)

Quoting N1120A (Reply 17):
Portland is definitely somewhere to consider. Great public transport, reasonable cost of living, nice weather outside the rain.

"nice weather outside the rain" = "well, other than that, how was the play, Mrs. Lincoln"?  

If money isn't a restraint, Hawaii is probably your best choice. If it is, I'd say you'll either have to live with humidity or a lower winter temp. I feel for you, the winter here in NY is killing me this year, and I'd seriously consider moving back to Florida if I didn't know how miserable I'd be in the summer.
 
dxing
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Tue Feb 02, 2010 1:10 am



Quoting N1120A (Reply 22):
Then again, Houston is just as bad.

I'd have to disagree. Since New Orleans is basically in a bowl, the air has a tendency to sit there day after day. Not quite the same as in Houston. Both have their humidity issues though.

Quoting N1120A (Reply 22):
2) Less expensive real estate generally isn't threatened by fire.

But who wants to live in South Central?  wink 
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N1120A
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Tue Feb 02, 2010 1:28 am



Quoting DXing (Reply 27):

I'd have to disagree. Since New Orleans is basically in a bowl, the air has a tendency to sit there day after day. Not quite the same as in Houston. Both have their humidity issues though.

New Orleans tends to get a mitigating breeze that I have never felt in Houston. Also, the actual temperature extremes aren't as bad.

Quoting DXing (Reply 27):

But who wants to live in South Central?

Mexicans these days. That said, I was talking about some of the more industrial beach communities (Torrance and especially Long Beach) as well as some of the more inland towns that still get good weather.
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dxing
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RE: What U.S. Area Has This Climate?

Sat Feb 06, 2010 4:09 pm

Welll here is the AARP top ten list published today. Not very realistic when you see San Diego and Honolulu included. That is unless you're an investment banker who just got his big bonus!

http://realestate.yahoo.com/promo/am...s-top-places-for-boomers-to-retire

Quoting N1120A (Reply 28):
New Orleans tends to get a mitigating breeze that I have never felt in Houston. Also, the actual temperature extremes aren't as bad.

I've lived in both and New Orleans felt hotter and more humid than Houston. Both are at the upper end of those limits so the difference probably wouldn't be apparent to someone not familiar with the climate. The temperatures are actually pretty similar all year as the towns are at roughly the same latitude and only 300 miles apart. Whatever Houston gets in terms of fronts and such, New Orleans usually gets within a day, if not hours.
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