zanl188
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El Faro Vessel Data Recorder - Found

Tue Apr 26, 2016 9:37 pm

Not retrieved yet but they know where it is...

http://youtu.be/Z_tyxF4kLnE

Ntsb Opens El Faro Accident Docket (by zanl188 Jan 3 2016 in Non Aviation)
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cjg225
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RE: El Faro Vessel Data Recorder - Found

Tue Apr 26, 2016 11:20 pm

Finally. Hopefully this sheds some light on this accident.
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zanl188
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Re: El Faro Vessel Data Recorder - Found

Thu Aug 04, 2016 10:43 pm

NTSB Launches Mission to Retrieve El Faro Voyage Data Recorder
________________________________________

August 4, 2016
WASHINGTON -- The NTSB’s third mission to the wreckage of the El Faro is scheduled to launch Friday from Virginia Beach, Virginia.

The mission’s primary objective is to retrieve the sunken cargo ship’s voyage data recorder.

The Military Sealift Command’s fleet ocean tug USNS Apache is expected to arrive at the accident site around August 9. Along with the NTSB, the U.S. Coast Guard, the U.S. Navy, and Phoenix International are joining the recovery effort, using CURV-21, a deep ocean remotely operated underwater vehicle to retrieve the VDR and conduct additional wreckage documentation.

“We’re hopeful that the information contained in the voyage data recorder will provide insights into the circumstances of the ship’s sinking,” said Brian Curtis, Acting Director of the NTSB Office of Marine Safety.

The El Faro, a U.S. flagged cargo ship, sank during Hurricane Joaquin Oct. 1, 2015. In October and November of 2015, the NTSB conducted an initial search mission to locate the vessel and conduct an initial survey of the debris field. The data collected during that mission was used by investigators to plot “high probability” search zones for the second mission in April, which resulted in the location of the mast and VDR. The wreckage is in approximately 15,000 feet of water, about 41 miles (36 nautical miles) northeast of Crooked Islands, Bahamas.

USNS Apache is expected to arrive at Mayport, Florida, between August 16 and August 20, following completion of the mission.

The cost for this mission is expected to be $500,000, bringing the total for the three missions to approximately $3 million.

NTSB media relations will issue updates as circumstances warrant.
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cjg225
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Re: El Faro Vessel Data Recorder - Found

Sat Aug 06, 2016 2:17 am

Well, hopefully all goes well. Thanks for posting an update.
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zanl188
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Re: El Faro Vessel Data Recorder - Found

Wed Aug 24, 2016 11:29 pm

Crew attempted to abandon ship...

26 Hours of Information Recovered from El Faro Voyage Data Recorder
________________________________________

Aug. 24, 2016
WASHINGTON — The National Transportation Safety Board announced Wednesday the convening of a voyage data recorder group, Monday, to develop a detailed transcript of the sounds and discernible words captured on the El Faro’s bridge audio, following the audition of the ship’s VDR.

The voyage data recorder from El Faro, a US flagged cargo ship that sank during Hurricane Joaquin in October 2015, was successfully recovered from the ocean floor Aug. 8, 2016, and transported to the NTSB’s laboratory here Aug. 12. Information from the El Faro’s VDR was successfully recovered Aug. 15.

About 26 hours of information was recovered from the VDR, including bridge audio, weather data and navigational data. Investigators examined the VDR, found it to be in good condition, and downloaded the memory module data in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommended procedures.

Numerous events leading up to the loss of the El Faro are heard on the VDR’s audio, recorded from microphones on the ship’s bridge. The quality of the recording is degraded because of high levels of background noise. There are times during the recording when the content of crew discussion is difficult to determine, at other times the content can be determined using audio filtering.

The recording began about 5:37 a.m., Sept. 30, 2015 – about 8 hours after the El Faro departed Jacksonville, Florida, with the ship about 150 nautical miles southeast of the city. The bridge audio from the morning of Oct. 1, captured the master and crew discussing their actions regarding flooding and the vessel’s list. The vessel’s loss of propulsion was mentioned on the bridge audio about 6:13 a.m. Also captured was the master speaking on the telephone, notifying shoreside personnel of the vessel’s critical situation, and preparing to abandon ship if necessary. The master ordered abandon ship and sounded the alarm about 7:30 a.m., Oct. 1, 2015. The recording ended about 10 minutes later when the El Faro was about 39 nautical miles northeast of Crooked Island, Bahamas. These times are preliminary and subject to change and final validation by the voyage data recorder group.

The VDR group’s technical experts will continue reviewing the entire recording, including crew discussions regarding the weather situation and the operation and condition of the ship.

Families of the El Faro’s crew were briefed about the results of the audition Wednesday prior to the NTSB’s public release of the characterization of the audition.

It remains unknown how long it will take to develop the final transcript of the El Faro’s VDR. The length of the recording and high levels of background noise will make transcript development a time consuming process. An update will be provided when warranted.
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cjg225
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Re: El Faro Vessel Data Recorder - Found

Thu Aug 25, 2016 12:16 pm

Hopefully there is something useful in that data. I had read yesterday that audio had been recovered, but didn't read the article so I didn't know what the content was.

For some reason, this makes me think of the sinking of the SS Edmund Fitzgerald. I wonder what this technology, if it had been implemented back then, would've uncovered in that situation.
Restoring Penn State's transportation heritage...
 
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Aesma
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Re: El Faro Vessel Data Recorder - Found

Thu Aug 25, 2016 3:35 pm

So it seems they discussed too long and decided to abandon ship too late.
New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
 
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csturdiv
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Re: El Faro Vessel Data Recorder - Found

Thu Aug 25, 2016 10:20 pm

I've always had an interest in this incident. The company that owned the vessel is a client for the company that I work for and I have had a lot of contact with their IT and integration department.
An American expat from the ORD area living and working in SYD
 
MarSciGuy
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Re: El Faro Vessel Data Recorder - Found

Fri Aug 26, 2016 3:00 am

This incident has been very near the front of my mind since it happened as well, due to a classmate of mine being aboard (and multiple other Maine Maritime alumni as well). I hope they can use the recorders; information to further inform training, safety or other procedural regimens and prevent another 33 souls lost at sea on a single US (or other) flagged ship for similar reasons.
"There weren't a ton of gnats there where a ton of gnats and their families as well!"
 
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Tugger
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Re: El Faro Vessel Data Recorder - Found

Fri Aug 26, 2016 2:48 pm

I am glad they have been able to recover the recorder and learn more about the sad fate of the crew and the ship. My condolences to the families and friends though I doubt this information will bring any real solace beyond how knowing more just helps with understanding what happened better.

The truth is I doubt this will really change the risk of losing one's life at sea. The crew may have taken "too long" but in the sea there is so much that can happen. It is bigger than any ship and can overwhelm things quickly. "Too long" is often based on 20/20 hindsight. I am betting the crew was doing their best and what was appropriate to abandon ship when something happened to immediately overwhelm the ship. Whether that be a rogue wave, or the ship just hitting its buoyancy limit unexpectedly, or cargo breaking free and causing a capsize, or something else, a ship can go down in seconds.

Risk is mitigated by avoiding situations that can lead to being overwhelmed. Good maintenance, avoiding storms as much as possible, careful planning, good safety systems and processes on board. But when one of those go wrong and you end up in "bad water" then the bets are off, the risk changes to one that is truly unknown.

Tugg
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