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falstaff
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The cars of your childhood

Tue Jan 31, 2017 4:31 pm

As I type this there are 29 political threads (or have turned into them) running on this forum's 1st page and all but one of them is about Donald Trump in one way or another. I miss the days when there were just a few political threads and more discussion about other stuff. As we all know some of us are righties, some are lefties and some are in-between. Yelling at each other is getting old and nobody is going to change anyone's political positions. So I figure we need to have a car thread for a change.

What kind of cars did your parents drive when you were a kid? For some of us that list may be long and others it may be short. I'll define "kid" as between the ages of birth and eighteen. What was your favorite?

My dad had company cars and usually got a new one every year and in some cases twice a year based in the mileage he put on them. The list for dad is a long one: 1975 Chevy Impala, '77 Impala, '78 Impala, '79 Impala, '80 Chevy Malibu, '81 Malibu, '82 Oldsmobile Omega, '83 Oldsmobile Cutlass Cierra, '85 Cutlass Cierra, '86 Mercury Sable, '87 Pontiac 6000, '87 Cutlass Cierra. '88 Chevy Celebrity, 89 Cutlass Cierra, '90 Pontiac 6000, '90 Buick Skylark, 93 Buick Century.

Mom's list is shorter: '76 Chevy Vega wagon, '79 Camaro, and '85 Ford Bronco II.

The favorite cars that my dad had would be the Oldsmobile Cutlass Cierras. They are anything but special, but because he had so many I have a soft spot for them because we took some great road trips on them. All of dad's were six cylinder models, which was an option as the base engine was a four cylinder. I always liked the speedometer in the '80s Cierras for some reason. When I was a kid I like the look of the '86 Sable. It seemed so futuristic at the time. My dad's favorite was the '87 Pontiac 6000. I'd love to find a clean '85 Cierra with the 2.8 V-6, but those don't exist where I live. The '85 is the best looking one in my opinion.

I liked Mom's '79 Camaro and its 5.7 V-8, plus it just looked cool. I loved cruising around with mom listening to Waylon Jennings 8-track tapes.
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BartSimpson
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Tue Jan 31, 2017 5:26 pm

"My" first car was a Simca - most certainly completely unknown outside France and its neighbours. Have a look at the station wagon at the end of this webpage:

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simca_1300

Next cars were exclusively Ford:
- 17m
- Consul
- Granada (the one that Cowley, the head from MI5 in the TV series "The Professionals", drove... I tried, in vain, to persuade my dad to buy a Ford Capri instead!)
- Sierra - we were the first in the city to have one
- Scorpio - again one of the first in town

Then I started my own history of cars, beginning with a VW Derby.

(I realise that most cars are not well known across the pond.)
 
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WildcatYXU
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Tue Jan 31, 2017 5:32 pm

Well, things looked different during my childhood in Eastern Europe. My parents ever had only one car - it was a '71 Skoda 100L. As the model designation shows, it had an one litre (accurately 998 ccm) fourbanger. What's interesting, they originally ordered a Skoda 1000MB in 1969. However, there was a shortage of cars, so they had to wait two years to receive it, so the model changed while they were waiting.
Dad drove this car until his death in 1981. He wanted to replace it with a Lada 2105, but cancer decided that it won't happen.
Mom never had a driver's licence, so she never had a car. Technically she never needed it since her office was in the same building as our apartment.
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ER757
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Tue Jan 31, 2017 6:06 pm

Falstaff, I couldn't agree with you more - the endless political threads are getting very old, very fast. Everyone could copy/paste their response from one to the next and be done with it. If you're on the left, you aren't going convince someone on the right that your opinion is correct and vice versa. Love your avatar by the way, used to go past the brewery on a regular basis when I was a kid, which brings me back to the topuc, my Dad's cars:
first one I remember was a Nash, 1952 model I believe. He called it the "upside down bathtub"
Next was a 1958 Chevy Belair, two-tone blue and white. We did our three-week roadtrip from Chicago to California and back in 1962 in that car. No air conditioning which made 114F in Tucson (hottest day ever there at the time) a real joy.
He kept that until 1969 when he got a Pontiac Ventura - big 400 cubic inch V-8, it was the car I learned to drive in. Used to love to smoke the tires when I got to take it out (nowhere near my house of course, Dad would have killed me on the spot).
After that it was a string of Oldsmobiles, Delta 88's and Royal Broughams that all seemed to run together in my mind
 
Flighty
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Tue Jan 31, 2017 6:32 pm

We had a 1980 Buick Century Wagon. A 1982 Volvo 242DL.

I remember going to Disney World and we rented (I believe) a 1982 Ford Fairmont while the grandparents had a Chevy Monte Carlo from 1982! These things were brand new, can't emphasize that enough. In 1984 my mom got a Buick Century. This is recent history for some of us, but to me, it is a true time warp because the restaurants we went to, the world we lived in is all gone now. The world of Three's Company seemed like reality at that time.. now it is so campy!
 
luckyone
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Tue Jan 31, 2017 6:44 pm

When I was born, my dad was driving an '82/'83 Camaro, and my mom an '84 Silver Buick Skylark. Dad traded the Camaro shortly afterward for an '87 Toyota Camry, because apparently infants, carseats, and Camaros don't gel well together. Mom traded the Skylark for an '89 Cavalier (shudder), that was about as basic as a car could be on those days, a lot of vinyl and a five speed manual.

The Cavalier lasted until '93 when some guy in a Mazda 626 t-boned Mom. She acquired a '93 Mazda Protégé, which at that time my brother and I thought was the last word in luxurious.

Sometime in '94 Dad traded the Toyota for a '93 Ford Explorer, the kind everybody was driving then, green with tan interior. Shortly afterward Mom assumed drivership of the Explorer.

In '97 the Mazda started showing signs of being used as a daily driver for a salesman, and Dad traded it for a '95 (or maybe '96) Thunderbird. I loved that car, because it was a "sports car."

In '99 my dad purchased a '94 Ford F-150. One word, basic. It had vinyl floors, a bouncy bench seat, and roll-down windows. It was powered by a straight six engine that cranked out 150 hp, with a five speed. I have distinct memories of this truck because my dad let me start driving it in the country where my family had a second home when I was about 14. The shifter was over a foot long, and felt as wobbly as a spatula stuck in a vat of J-ello. It's shifting was about as equally precise. He would not let me take my driver's test until I could parallel park that truck on a hill, in both directions. I grew up in northern Georgia, which isn't flat anyway. Needless to say living in Chicago paralleling has been a breeze. He still has it.

The Explorer toddered along, requiring at least one new radiator, and a replaced driver's seat (for a while the driver's seat reclining mechanism broke, and the seat had to be propped up with a tire from a golf cart, until a new seat with a slightly different pattern replaced it) until 2001 when it was retired with 267,000 miles for a lightly used Ford Expedition. With the expedition came a much larger boat as my parents continued to ride the benefits of the '90s.

In 2001 my grandmother gave me her '94 Toyota Corolla for my first car (I was 15 at the time). I drove it from 2002-03 until I became too tall to fit in the thing. It was traded for a 2000 Ford Explorer Sport, which I drove until 2014 when I traded it for a Volvo S80, which I drove until last week when my spouse and I traded our two cars for one Volvo XC70.

The Thunderbird bid its farewells in 2003 for a slightly used 2003 Ford Explorer Sport, because my dad liked mine so much. He still drives it.

In 2012 Mom traded her Expedition, by then well-worn and far larger than she needed with both kids grown for an Edge that she still drives.
 
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AirPacific747
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Tue Jan 31, 2017 7:02 pm

My father had a car like this one and same color. I'm still a huge fan of this model. Some day I'll buy a second hand car with low milage from somewhere in Germany.

Image
 
vikkyvik
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Tue Jan 31, 2017 7:38 pm

In somewhat chronological order....model years provided if I remember them:

Volkswagen Beetle (yellow)
Volkswagen Dasher (maybe? not entirely sure...possibly a Rabbit...whatever it was, it was silver)
Mercury Topaz (blue....but might have been a lemon if memory serves)
Dodge Caravan (silver)
1992? Plymouth Grand Voyager (dark gray)
1995 Dodge Intrepid with the 3.5L engine (silver I think.....which is what I drove in high school....I loved that car)
Buick Century (station wagon, ugly beige)
1996 Plymouth Grand Voyager (dark green)
1997? Chrysler Town & Country (gold)

I think that's it. Seems like a lot of cars.....
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UltimateDelta
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Tue Jan 31, 2017 7:42 pm

Growing up, my parents had a dark blue '91 Chevy S10 Blazer and a red '96 Subaru Outback as the primary family-haulers, and my dad had an '89 Ford Tempo for a commuter car. They had originally bought the Tempo so my mom could replace an older Escort, but by the time I came along, in my eyes the Tempo was his car, and I remember riding in it very infrequently.

When I was six, they traded the Blazer (by then suffering from pretty extensive body rust) for a new 2001 Pontiac Grand Prix. My first memory of it was the trip home from the dealer (we took a spirited drive around some local highways first, of course!), with "Runnin' Down a Dream" blasting from the radio. I drove it all through high school (borrowing a friend's Honda del Sol to cover the time between getting my license and my mom buying a second car for her general use) until heading off to college where I got by the first few years without wheels.

A few years after the Grand Prix, my dad replaced the Tempo with a '99 Saturn SL2, and he drove that until just a few years ago. My parents got divorced a couple of years later, and he got the Outback and sold it to my aunt, who still has it.
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LAH1
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Tue Jan 31, 2017 7:55 pm

The first and best in IMO was a black Railton coupe with a red fabric roof, large bull frog eyeball headlights, this was in the mid fifties. Dad traded it for an early Ford Consul then back in business with a Jowett Javelin. he polished the picnic tray tables on the back of the front seats as often as the windscreen. Still looks good these days.
 
YVRLTN
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Tue Jan 31, 2017 7:57 pm

My dad was a Citroen man... until they went too generic and boring for him

81 Citroen CX Safari when I was born, I dont really remember it.
84 Renault 11 (think AMC sold this in the US as the Encore)
88 Citroen BX GTI - only a 1.9 but could go for its time, surprising for its boxy shape
90 Citroen XM 3.0 V6 - that was a beast and very comfortable
94 Citroen XM 2.1 diesel
93 Citroen XM 2.5
00 Chrysler PT Cruiser
Since then he has an 03 Jeep Cherokee (Liberty over here) and kept it ever since as its a gas guzzler in the UK and worth zip...

Prior to my time has had a Bijou, GS, DS and Amie 8 as well as a Hillman Hunter, all would be absolute collectors if he still had them

He also had work vans
81 Citroen 2CV van - very rare as a RH drive model, was an Ex Belgian Post van where they had the steering switched so the driver could step onto the curb
88 Honda Acty microvan
99 Daihatsu Hijet
Since I was 18 he had two more Daihatsu's (a newer Hijet and an Extol), then a Fiat Scudo and now a Peugeot Partner
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flipdewaf
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Tue Jan 31, 2017 8:19 pm

There were many and interesting things but for me the memories of childhood cars are summed up by a big red landrover, the"landie" wa called it. It was a 110 landrover series 3 with 4litre v8 putting out 200hp of noise. Unstoppable is the only way to describe it. It had its quirks like the passenger widow needed holding while you shut the door or it wouldn't fall in on you.

My favourite story is that me and my brothers decided that we should tie our sledge to the back of one of the motorbikes and use it to tow us round the field. My dad came running out and shouted at us "you boys are so stupid!" We felt bad because we thought we were in trouble for doing dangerous things but my dad then proceeded to say " if I tie a rope to the tow ball on the landie I can tow you all at once". Fun times.

It was a great car because it was rubbish and we did t car if it got dented or mucky.

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Channex757
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Tue Jan 31, 2017 8:24 pm

When I was a (very) young kid, my parents bought a Morris Minor. It was the first brand new car they had ever owned. My mother kept it for some years but my dad had multiple vehicles as he worked in the motor trade and subsequently heavy plant.

I can still remember being brought home from hospital in that car with a cast on my arm after breaking my first bone.
 
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falstaff
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Tue Jan 31, 2017 8:43 pm

BartSimpson wrote:
Sierra - we were the first in the city to have one


In the US wasn't that called the Merkur XR4ti? Those were cool looking cars, but not very reliable here and party were expensive.

BartSimpson wrote:
Scorpio - again one of the first in town

A Merkur Scorpio in the US. Those were neat cars, but I never saw many around. The XR4ti was fairly common.

WildcatYXU wrote:
Well, things looked different during my childhood in Eastern Europe. My parents ever had only one car - it was a '71 Skoda 100L

Communism sure made some hideous cars. I wouldn't mind owning a Trabant just because they are so awful...

ER757 wrote:
used to go past the brewery on a regular basis when I was a kid

Which one? There were 13 different Falstaff plants; 12 breweries and 1 malting plant.

ER757 wrote:
first one I remember was a Nash, 1952 model I believe. He called it the "upside down bathtub"

my grandfather had one, long before I was born. It sure did look like a bathtub.

Flighty wrote:
1982 Ford Fairmont

When I was a kid we my parents and I would visit friends in San Diego. We would fly there from DEN and we would borrow their spare car, which was an '80 Fairmont. Six cylinder, 4 speed, with AC and an AM/FM radio. I would love to have that car today. It was sooooo boring.

luckyone wrote:
In '99 my dad purchased a '94 Ford F-150. One word, basic. It had vinyl floors, a bouncy bench seat, and roll-down windows. It was powered by a straight six engine that cranked out 150 hp, with a five speed.


One of the last true great American pickups.

vikkyvik wrote:
1992? Plymouth Grand


typical mom car of my high school days.

vikkyvik wrote:
1995 Dodge Intrepid with the 3.5L engine (silver I think.....which is what I drove in high school....I loved that car)

I like those too. The 3.5 had a lot of power. Other than blowing apart A/C evaporators those were pretty good cars.

YVRLTN wrote:
81 Citroen 2CV van -

That is sweet! You don't ever see those in the US.
My mug slaketh over on Falstaff N503
 
Flighty
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Tue Jan 31, 2017 10:03 pm

falstaff wrote:
BartSimpson wrote:
Sierra - we were the first in the city to have one

Flighty wrote:
1982 Ford Fairmont

When I was a kid we my parents and I would visit friends in San Diego. We would fly there from DEN and we would borrow their spare car, which was an '80 Fairmont. Six cylinder, 4 speed, with AC and an AM/FM radio. I would love to have that car today. It was sooooo boring.

luckyone wrote:
In '99 my dad purchased a '94 Ford F-150. One word, basic. It had vinyl floors, a bouncy bench seat, and roll-down windows. It was powered by a straight six engine that cranked out 150 hp, with a five speed.


One of the last true great American pickups.

.


Agreed that the Ford straight 6 is an amazing motor. My neighbor specifically sought out a beater truck that had the six.

About '80 Fords, my grandfather's last new car was an '80 Mustang, 4 cylinder automatic. It had an FM radio and a heater. It was actually a pretty sharp-looking car. Had a 3-spoke steel steering wheel. He wasn't much for option packages... This was a cheap city car. He kept it 17 years until he was too old to drive it.

Still, the allure of saying "We'll take the Mustang!" Kind of humorous. Although a terrible car, a car that looks good and has manual steering, carburetor and RWD is still better than most cars.
 
vikkyvik
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Tue Jan 31, 2017 10:46 pm

falstaff wrote:
I like those too. The 3.5 had a lot of power. Other than blowing apart A/C evaporators those were pretty good cars.


Yep. Powerful and roomy. Perfect for a bunch of high school kids to tool around town.

Also, I forgot the most obvious car of my youth. A good old '87-or-so Plymouth Reliant.

If memory serves, I took my driver's test in that car, because it was impossible to do anything stupid or unexpected in it.
I'm watching Jeopardy. The category is worst Madonna songs. "This one from 1987 is terrible".
 
dtw9
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Tue Jan 31, 2017 10:51 pm

Dad, 1961 Olds Dynamic 88 ,1964 Jetstar 88, 1965 Jetstar 88, 1967 Delta 88, 1968 Delmont 88, 1970 Delta 88, 1972 Delta 88, 1974 Cutlass Supreme, 1975 Cutlass Supreme, 1977 Delta 88. Dad died in 1979 at a young age of 57
Mom 1957 Super 88 wagon with J-2 tri-power, 1964 F-85, 1969 Cutlass S, 1973 Cutlass Supreme, 1980 Chevy Citation, 1984 Cutlass Ciera, 1989 Pontiac Bonneville SSE, 1992 Pontiac Bonneville SE, 1998 Lincoln Town car, 2002 Lincoln Town car, 2006 Lincoln Town car, 2009 Cadillac DTS, 2011 Buick LaCrosse, 2015 Buick Regal, Just sold Moms last car. No more driving She's 96

Falstaff I think you'll appreciate this site http://www.lov2xlr8.no/broch1.html
 
WIederling
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Tue Jan 31, 2017 11:08 pm

BartSimpson wrote:
"My" first car was a Simca - most certainly completely unknown outside France and its neighbours. Have a look at the station wagon at the end of this webpage:

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simca_1300

I know the type. Never seen a station wagon of that type before.

My father being a Deutsche Bundesbahn Beamter, we had a car very late. I was the first to get a driving license.
My father next. My mother after 129 hours of driving lessons.
My father bought a new Lada 1200 Combi ( station wagon. ). Strange thing.
My father assembled Soviet lorries as a 17 year old POW in what later became "Togliattigrad".
For the purpose a satisfactory product.

My own vehicles "from early on":
Honda Dax St50 Moped
various Heinkel scooters. x
VW Typ2 "Grossraumpritsche"
A Trojan 200 ( license built Heinkel cabin cruiser ) x
A Ford FK1250 '64 former fire engine "TSF"
A Mercedes Benz L319 small lorry with the longer 4m flatbed.
VW Passat LS Automatic '73
Citroen CX2200 D Break, long chassis
Opel Kadett C Caravan
DAF 66 Marathon Coupe
Simson S50 x

family (mine) cars:
Mini Clubman Estate RHD x
Another 2 VW Bully
Peugeot 205 D
Subaru Libero 2
Hyundai Atos Prime
Toyoata Yaris Verso x
Hyundai I10 x

x == still around.
Murphy is an optimist
 
VapourTrails
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 12:05 am

falstaff wrote:
As I type this there are 29 political threads (or have turned into them) running on this forum's 1st page and all but one of them is about Donald Trump in one way or another. I miss the days when there were just a few political threads and more discussion about other stuff. As we all know some of us are righties, some are lefties and some are in-between. Yelling at each other is getting old and nobody is going to change anyone's political positions. So I figure we need to have a car thread for a change.

What kind of cars did your parents drive when you were a kid? For some of us that list may be long and others it may be short. I'll define "kid" as between the ages of birth and eighteen. What was your favorite?


Good idea. :thumbsup:

We were a family that owned Valiants. :talktothehand: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrysler_Valiant

Of course, we had a few of the series, and because you could use parts interachangably with similar types. :wink2:

I don't really know why we had them specifically, I will have to ask! They were popular though, and easy to come by. Not so much now, they are real collectors items! Should have kept them (longer).

We also lived way out in the country so we had the room. Before that we had a Ford Falcon, just the one, and later on, we had a Ford Cortina, or three IIRC.

I wouldn't say I ever had a favourite. I just wasn't into cars and am still not a 'car hugger' kind of person. The thing I liked about them though (the Valiants), is they were built like a tank. We had a side on collision once and it barely made a dent! Not so the other car. Also, there was lots of room in them, great for families and all the gear you needed if going somewhere. They were not that comfortable - particularly the bench seats, but I would say they were well made, compared to other Australian-made cars.

We fully owned every car we had. Did all the mechanical repairs at home. They were also quite powerful, particularly for towing, which we did a bit of too, and petrol (gas) was not as $ as it is now.

Most importantly for me, I learnt to drive in one. :thumbsup: The car was huge, a station wagon, but I see this as a positive thing!
 
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Aesma
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 12:29 am

My maternal grandfather was a foreman at a Fiat plant in Italy (he was Italian) amongst other jobs, after he immigrated to France he was a foreman at a Simca plant (owned by Fiat at the time, then Chrysler). I don't think I've ever seen a Simca...

When I was born my parents owned a pair of Renault 5 (Le Car in the US), one yellow one pink.

When I was a kid they owned a black Ford Orion Mark II. No A/C, all I can remember of that car is sweating as hell in it when we would go to Italy. Also that we drove it until the engine needed replacing.

After that we got a white 1991 Peugeot 405 break (estate) that would last till I was almost 18. It had a diesel engine, the first in the family (not the last). No turbo though. No A/C. 69hp 1.9d, fine when lightly loaded in day to day use, not so fine when travelling, unsafe when going skiing. I learned to drive on that car, since then I don't hesitate to drop gears anytime I feel it's needed !

When I was 17-18 the Peugeot got replaced with a silver 2001 Citroën Evasion 2.2HDi minivan, with a turbo, A/C, and 110hp. Much better for travelling. My father couldn't use a company car anymore (too much abuse by colleagues) so he bought a sage green 1999 Fiat Brava 1.6SX. Small car, 100hp petrol, smooth engine, not a sports car but you would get over the speed limit without realizing it, it ran great until it ended up at the bottom of the ocean, so it got replaced by a 2002 Citroën C3 1.4SX, 75hp petrol that is now mine.
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VapourTrails
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 12:51 am

Of course, I did forget, in the middle of these, we also had a classic Mini aka a Mr Bean car.

It was great for running around and of course, balanced out the fuel bill with the others. I didn't like riding in it much though, because it was so low to the road, and you had small car syndrome. A lot of people just pretended you were hardly there and IMHO other road users were not that considerate of a road bubble. :redflag:

People were often putting in offers to buy it though! Ending up getting a good price for it, I think - I hope! It is nice to be in that position of name the price for a car.
 
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WildcatYXU
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 1:37 am

WIederling wrote:
My father bought a new Lada 1200 Combi ( station wagon. ). Strange thing.


There was nothing strange on Lada 1200. It was just too late. The Lada 1200 was a heavily modified Fiat 124 that was the car of year 1967 in Europe. The largest modification was the OHC engine, never available in the original car. The Combi version was originally the Fiat 124 Familiare

falstaff wrote:
WildcatYXU wrote:
Well, things looked different during my childhood in Eastern Europe. My parents ever had only one car - it was a '71 Skoda 100L

Communism sure made some hideous cars. I wouldn't mind owning a Trabant just because they are so awful...


True. But it could have been different. Skoda worked on some rather nice designs in late sixties and early seventies.Like this: http://auta5p.eu/katalog/skoda/s720_01a.jpg
Unfortunately, none of them came to fruition.
And then, there is Tatra. They produced sedans with V8 engines in the back.Too bad these weren't intended for the general public.
Tatra 603: https://www.hemmings.com/magazine/hsx/2 ... 76711.html
It was later replaced with the Tatra 613 that used a 3.5 litre V8 installed on the rear axle: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tatra_613
BTW, rumour has it that the VW Golf started it's life as Trabant 603. The concept was allegedly too complex for the East - German auto industry therefore was never approved for production and was sold to VW.
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BartSimpson
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 8:31 am

falstaff wrote:
BartSimpson wrote:
Sierra - we were the first in the city to have one

In the US wasn't that called the Merkur XR4ti? Those were cool looking cars, but not very reliable here and party were expensive.


Almost. The XR4i was the sportscar subtype - also in Europe. We of course had the four-door, family-style, version.

Wikipedia fun fact of the day: The Merkur XR4i was built in Germany at the same plant where the famous Karmann Ghia originated from.
 
WIederling
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 8:57 am

WildcatYXU wrote:
WIederling wrote:
My father bought a new Lada 1200 Combi ( station wagon. ). Strange thing.


There was nothing strange on Lada 1200. It was just too late. The Lada 1200 was a heavily modified Fiat 124 that was the car of year 1967 in Europe. The largest modification was the OHC engine, never available in the original car. The Combi version was originally the Fiat 124 Familiare

I do know all that.
Strange in respect to driving a "communist" car in western Germany, long before the "Wiedervereinigung".

Engine was said to have been done by Mercedes Benz. The 1200cc engine was a super thing.
After our first Lada was "killed by a horse" it was replaced with the same type but the larger 1500cc engine.
Servo brake (to accomodate my hip impaired mother) only available with the larger engine. That thing
never did show the added 15hp in performance. ok the brakes worked rather well :-)
Murphy is an optimist
 
WIederling
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 9:09 am

WildcatYXU wrote:
Tatra 603: https://www.hemmings.com/magazine/hsx/2 ... 76711.html
It was later replaced with the Tatra 613 that used a 3.5 litre V8 installed on the rear axle: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tatra_613
BTW, rumour has it that the VW Golf started it's life as Trabant 603. The concept was allegedly too complex for the East - German auto industry therefore was never approved for production and was sold to VW.


Tatra had quite the history of being technologically up front:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tatra_87

When I did my thesis work at VW Wolfsburg (~1988) the "updated" Trabant with Polo drive train and
the Wartburg with 1.3l Polo Engine were in development / readied for production.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trabant#L ... .7E1991.29
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wartburg_1.3
Murphy is an optimist
 
WIederling
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 9:42 am

WIederling wrote:
....


While the Passat was derivative of the then new Audi 80 ( that being a progression of the Audi F103 )
and the Polo came up as a "trim changed" Audi 50 copy the Golf was afaik a VW in house development. EA 266
They all share the boxy looking trend of the time ( also see K70 ).
If you look at the platform design elements of the 3 (4:Trabant ?) types you can see the different derivation.

If you like goosebumps have a look at the VW EA 266 ( dumped when all was ready for production.)
Murphy is an optimist
 
Olddog
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 9:45 am

 
WIederling
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 10:22 am

Olddog wrote:


They did get the date wrong 2017 --> 1917 :-)
Murphy is an optimist
 
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Dano1977
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 10:31 am

I used to get taken to school in one of these.

Image
The average EU official - he has the organising ability of the Italians, the flexibility of the Germans and the modesty of the French. And that's topped up by the imagination of the Belgians, the generosity of the Dutch.
 
JJJ
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 10:33 am

falstaff wrote:
What kind of cars did your parents drive when you were a kid? For some of us that list may be long and others it may be short. I'll define "kid" as between the ages of birth and eighteen. What was your favorite?


Dad's first car was a SEAT 850 (basically a rebadged FIAT 850) which ended up giving to my grandfather, so my memories of that car (deep red) are in my grampa's hands. Then he moved to a Renault 5, which he totalled driving under a truck (miracously with barely a scratch) so I don't have any memories or pictures with it.

He was a bit of a tinker, so after that he kept two different Citroen 2CV he got for cheap, cannibalising parts from one to the other and at one point doing an engine swap by himself. Both he painted green, just because.

After that (and the first car I clearly remember in and out, including plate number) was an Opel Kadett GSI, lemon yellow, followed by a white E21 BMW 3-series.

That's when he converted to Alfista with a 33, then a 155, finally a 156. He's driving a Ford Kuga now.

At the same time there were bikes at home too (mom usually took the car), a Bultaco Lobito then a Puch and a Vespa and finally a Ducati 350. And of course there was my uncle's R5 Turbo. The car my mother forbade me to inherit (a shame, but she was probably right). Still got to drive it hard extensively, just not on my own.
 
Bongodog1964
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 10:42 am

YVRLTN wrote:
My dad was a Citroen man... until they went too generic and boring for him


as well as a Hillman Hunter, all would be absolute collectors if he still had them

He also had work vans
81 Citroen 2CV van - very rare as a RH drive model, was an Ex Belgian Post van where they had the steering switched so the driver could step onto the curb
88 Honda Acty microvan

My" first car was a Simca - most certainly completely unknown outside France and its neighbours.

https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simca_1300

Next cars were exclusively Ford:
- 17m
- Consul
- Granada (the one that Cowley, the head from MI5 in the TV series "The Professionals", drove... I tried, in vain, to persuade my dad to buy a Ford Capri instead!)
- Sierra - we were the first in the city to have one
- Scorpio - again one of the first in town

Then I started my own history of cars, beginning with a VW Derby.

(I realise that most cars are not well known across the pond.)


Citroens did have a unique feel to them, as did many makes years ago, the rot set in here with the Ford Sierra, condemned by many as the "jellymould" due to its styling being heavily influenced by the wind tunnel, but within a few years every manufacturer was heading the same way.

As to the Simca, I can remember a few, not one of the greatest by any means, and the Honda Acty van, little slab sided thing with the acceleration and load carrying ability of a snail. And the Hillman Hunter, another horrid car of the 70's

My father was also an avid driver of "Dagenham dustbins" we had a Zephyr 4 followed by a Zephyr 6, Cortina Mk3 esttate, Mk4 estate, Sierra estate X 2 . I followed suit with Escorts and a Fiesta. XR2
 
jetwet1
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 11:49 am

BartSimpson wrote:
- Granada (the one that Cowley, the head from MI5 in the TV series "The Professionals", drove... I tried, in vain, to persuade my dad to buy a Ford Capri instead!)

(I realise that most cars are not well known across the pond.)


Good attempt on the Capri, I have a love affair with them growing up, started with a gold 1.6 L, moved up to a 2.0 Laser, then an old 3.0, then to a blue 2.8i Special, loved that car, my final one was a Tickford, which I kept for about a month before it dawned on me that I would end up in a ditch very quickly, the thing was nice to drive, but as any Capri owner will tell you, at the limit they want to bring the tail round quickly.
I ended up trading it in against an RS 500 Cosworth, which while being more powerful, quicker and a hell of a lot safer to drive, did lack a certain something from the Capri.

Anyways, cars when we were growing up.

Lancia Beta
Alfa Sud
Ford Cortina
Ford Fiesta

After my parents split she ended up getting a rather nice Jag XJ6
 
jetwet1
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 12:40 pm

BartSimpson wrote:
falstaff wrote:
BartSimpson wrote:
Sierra - we were the first in the city to have one

In the US wasn't that called the Merkur XR4ti? Those were cool looking cars, but not very reliable here and party were expensive.


Almost. The XR4i was the sportscar subtype - also in Europe. We of course had the four-door, family-style, version.

Wikipedia fun fact of the day: The Merkur XR4i was built in Germany at the same plant where the famous Karmann Ghia originated from.


The body was that of an XR4i (with a few tweaks to get by the Feds), the drive train though was from the Mustang SVO, thanks to the base being a Sierra, it's not to hard to convert it into a Cosworth look alike, though it will lack the power of the Cosworth of course. I'm sure if you managed to get the whale tail on an XR4ti you would get some interesting looks on the streets here in the US.
 
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WildcatYXU
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 12:55 pm

WIederling wrote:

When I did my thesis work at VW Wolfsburg (~1988) the "updated" Trabant with Polo drive train and
the Wartburg with 1.3l Polo Engine were in development / readied for production.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trabant#L ... .7E1991.29
https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wartburg_1.3


None of these were sold in Czechoslovakia. But they were very popular in Hungary, just as the previous models with two stroke engines were. People living in rural areas loved the Wartburg, as it was very well suited for their dirt roads.


WIederling wrote:
WIederling wrote:
....


While the Passat was derivative of the then new Audi 80 ( that being a progression of the Audi F103 )
and the Polo came up as a "trim changed" Audi 50 copy the Golf was afaik a VW in house development. EA 266
They all share the boxy looking trend of the time ( also see K70 ).
If you look at the platform design elements of the 3 (4:Trabant ?) types you can see the different derivation.

If you like goosebumps have a look at the VW EA 266 ( dumped when all was ready for production.)



The EA 266 is incredible. The flat engine under the seat would be a nightmare to maintain, but otherwise this could be a fantastic car.
223, 310, 319, 320, 321, 321N, 332, 333, 343, 345, 346, 732, 735, 73G, 738, 7M8, 739, 744, 752, 753, 762, 763, 77E, 77L, 77W, 788, 789, AT4, AT7, BEH, C402, CR2, CRA, CR7, CR9, DH1, DH3, DH4, E45, E70, E75, E90, E95, F28, F50, F100, MD82, Saab 340, YAK40
 
sccutler
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 1:07 pm

Mom had a 1956 DeSoto Fireflight, Dad had a 1959 Ford Fairlane (replaced by a '63 Falcon).

Cool times. The DeSoto had factory air (in the back).
...three miles from BRONS, clear for the ILS one five approach...
 
Calder
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 1:35 pm

The first car I can remember of my parents was a beige colored Mercury Le Sable, I think it was a 3rd generation.

Shortly after that my mother had a green Pontiac Grand Prix of some mid 90's vintage.

Her next vehicle was the one I drove in highschool, a 97' automatic Ford F-150. Living in northern Maine the body rotted off that thing so fast (<7 years) it really was a shame because the powertrain was still in pretty good shape.

My father is a merchant marine, and I can't remember him having a car until the early 2000's when he bought a 97' F-150 like my mothers, only his had a 5 speed. I loved that truck dearly!

Next was a 94' Ford Ranger for me and my sisters to drive, but it was a stick, and neither of my siblings were too keen on driving a beater pickup around, which meant it was all mine!
C. T.
 
Bongodog1964
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 1:42 pm

jetwet1 wrote:
BartSimpson wrote:
- Granada (the one that Cowley, the head from MI5 in the TV series "The Professionals", drove... I tried, in vain, to persuade my dad to buy a Ford Capri instead!)

(I realise that most cars are not well known across the pond.)


Good attempt on the Capri, I have a love affair with them growing up, started with a gold 1.6 L, moved up to a 2.0 Laser, then an old 3.0, then to a blue 2.8i Special, loved that car, my final one was a Tickford, which I kept for about a month before it dawned on me that I would end up in a ditch very quickly, the thing was nice to drive, but as any Capri owner will tell you, at the limit they want to bring the tail round quickly.
I ended up trading it in against an RS 500 Cosworth, which while being more powerful, quicker and a hell of a lot safer to drive, did lack a certain something from the Capri.

Anyways, cars when we were growing up.

Lancia Beta
Alfa Sud
Ford Cortina
Ford Fiesta



After my parents split she ended up getting a rather nice Jag XJ6


Ah the Capri, quite few drivers took to carrying a few concrete blocks in the boot in an attempt to cure the tail happiness problem, its really says something that you found the RS500 less of a handful, as this was seriously overpowered.

As to the "growing up cars" were your parents addicted to rust ? out of all those the Fiesta was the least affected, the Lancia and Alfa generally awful, and Jags of that era whilst still having the body looking half decent generally were as rotten as a pear in floorpan and wheelarches.
 
WIederling
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 2:36 pm

".. out of all those the Fiesta was the least affected, the Lancia and Alfa generally awful,.."

Fiesta: there is a reason that one was called "Ford Fiasko"
corrosion: worst offenders were the early VW Golf ( 74..~77 ) cheap steel panels used. K70 the same.

then AlphaSud was terrible. the other Italians depended a bit on where you drove it.
Wet and salty northern Germany: you could watch them rot away as if they ere leprose.
But few day to day use cars from that era survived in good condition.
No surprise classics are reimported from the US and other dry climates.
Murphy is an optimist
 
Bongodog1964
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 6:11 pm

WIederling wrote:
".. out of all those the Fiesta was the least affected, the Lancia and Alfa generally awful,.."

Fiesta: there is a reason that one was called "Ford Fiasko"
corrosion: worst offenders were the early VW Golf ( 74..~77 ) cheap steel panels used. K70 the same.

then AlphaSud was terrible. the other Italians depended a bit on where you drove it.
Wet and salty northern Germany: you could watch them rot away as if they ere leprose.
But few day to day use cars from that era survived in good condition.
No surprise classics are reimported from the US and other dry climates.


When you think back to the 70's at early 80's its hard to describe just how bad the corrosion problem was on cars. I recall a friends mother having one of the first Datsuns (now Nissan) imported into the UK it had rust patches on panels the size of your hand after about 4 years. Our village vicar had a Lancia Beta, that was just as bad. We had a garage next door to where I worked that would do you a cheap bottom half respray, My 1984 Ford Escort certainly needed it and it was only 4 years old !!

It didn't help that the UK car industry was seemingly always on strike, car bodies would be degreased and heading for the primer stage when the line stopped, 2 days later when they went back to work they would spray straight over the rust that had developed in the meantime

The Fiesta was actually quite a good car in the XR2 form, I wouldn't want to drive one regularly now however.
Dad had a Ford Transit van for work, I got plenty of welding practice on those, blocking up holes around the wheel arches.
 
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ER757
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 6:33 pm

quote: Which one? There were 13 different Falstaff plants; 12 breweries and 1 malting plant.

The one on the south side of Chicago as you headed towards Gary, IN. I think it was along the Skyway but it was so long ago I wouldn't bet my life on it
 
coolian2
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 7:11 pm

Horrid Mazdas. I asked my dad about them and he's purged them from his memory.

It's scary when a freaking Corolla is the "coolest" car he's been in.
Q300/ATR72-600/737-200/-300/-400/-700/-800/A320/767-200/-300/757-200/777-300ER/
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jetwet1
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Wed Feb 01, 2017 8:45 pm

Bongodog1964 wrote:

Ah the Capri, quite few drivers took to carrying a few concrete blocks in the boot in an attempt to cure the tail happiness problem, its really says something that you found the RS500 less of a handful, as this was seriously overpowered.

As to the "growing up cars" were your parents addicted to rust ? out of all those the Fiesta was the least affected, the Lancia and Alfa generally awful, and Jags of that era whilst still having the body looking half decent generally were as rotten as a pear in floorpan and wheelarches.


I learned very early on in the 1.6 L to respect the Capri, lift off in a corner and the back end was coming round, touch the throttle mid corner in the wet, the back end was coming round.

The issue with the Tickford was turbo lag, there was no rhyme or reason to it, though slightly better handling than the 2.8i it was based off, you had to be careful not to get near 3500 rpm mid corner or going round a large round about as that boost would kick in and then it would be a handful, the RS500 was a lot more linear in that respect. As it's now more than 25 years old, I am giving serious thoughts of bringing it over here, though the market for them in the UK is strong right now, either way, it's still a great car.

As to the rust.....Yeah, from what I remember the Lancia was the real problem child on that front, I think it was my dads idea to replace it with the Sud, I could have the order reversed, it was a LONG time ago, after that I remember my mother putting her foot down and the "no more Italian cars" rule came to the house.
 
WIederling
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Thu Feb 02, 2017 12:33 pm

As to the rust.....

There is a reason that when vinyl roofs were popular the cars also got a black "Trauerrand" below the belt line. :-)
( usually growing an inch per year upwards ..)
Murphy is an optimist
 
Bongodog1964
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Thu Feb 02, 2017 1:36 pm

WIederling wrote:
As to the rust.....

There is a reason that when vinyl roofs were popular the cars also got a black "Trauerrand" below the belt line. :-)
( usually growing an inch per year upwards ..)


Vinyl roofs, what a memory, did we really think they were cool ? Yes we did, lots of people even had aftermarket ones fitted, which of course soon started to peel off at the edge
 
PHLBOS
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Thu Feb 02, 2017 4:45 pm

I probably wrote something similar way back when on this forum regarding past and/or family cars.

Nonetheless, and in case my older post(s) had any omissions; here's the rundown up to present vehicles owned (starting from as early as 1966)
Currently-owned vehicles are shown in bold:

Myself:
1969 Ford LTD sedan/302 V8 (owned 1982-1984), 1974 Chevy Impala 4-dr. hardtop/350 V8 (owned 1984), 1976 Ford LTD 4-dr./351M V8 (owned 1985-1988), 1985 Mercury Grand Marquis LS sedan (owned 1988-1992), 1989 Chevy Caprice Classic sedan (owned 1992-1996), 1976 Ford LTD Landau coupe 351M V8 (owned 1993-2010, stored at my brother's 2007-2010), 1997 Ford Crown Victoria LX w/the Handling & Performance Package (aka HPP) (owned 1996-2016, totaled in a 3-car accident on Feb. 13, 2016 @ 6:05 PM), 2007 Ford Mustang Pony Package convertible (owned since August 2007) & 2011 Ford Crown Victoria LX (former-rental) (owned since March 2016).

My father (ones that I have recollection of & excluding parts/project vehicles):
1959 Chevy Impala convertible (owned 1966(?)-1968, engine caught fire), 1963 Mercury Monterrey Marauder convertible/390 V8 (owned 1968-1970), 1965 Ford Mustang convertible/289 V8, manual transmission (not sure if 3 or 4 speed) (owned 1970-1971), 1969 Mercury Colony Park 8-seat wagon/390 V8 (owned 1971-1974), 1972 Ford Econoline van (inherited company vehicle owned 1973-1974), 1974 Ford Pinto Squire wagon, 4-speed manual (owned 1974-1976), 1977 Chevy Monte Carlo/350 V8 (company vehicle 1976-1978), 1969 Ford Country Squire 6-seat wagon (inherited from my older brother, owned 1978-1979), 1971 Ford LTD Brougham coupe/351W V8 (inherited from my mother, owned 1979-1980), 1972 Ford Club Wagon, 8-seater/302 V8 (owned 1980-1981), 1979 Ford Econoline van/351W V8 (owned 1981-1982, due to it being stolen & never recovered), 1972 BMW Bavaria (owned 1982-1987, spent most of its time in our garage), 1972 Ford Pinto wagon, 4-speed manual (owned 1983), 1983 Ford Escort L, 3-dr. hatchback, 4-speed manual (owned 1983-1987, totaled in an accident), 1977 Ford Econoline van 351W V8 (ran on leaded gas) (owned 1987-1989), 1983 Ford Thunderbird/302 (owned 1990-1992), 1990 Ford Thunderbird/3.8L V6 (owned 1992-1994), 1991 Ford Explorer 4-dr. (owned 1994-1999), 1990 Lincoln Mark VII (owned 1999-2002), 1994 Lincoln Mark VIII (owned 2002-2004), 2001 Ford Escape/V6 AWD (owned 2004-2006), 1995 Lincoln Mark VIII (owned 2006-2008), 2004 Ford Escape/V6 AWD (owned 2008-2012). He has no longer driven since a fall-related accident circa Sept. 2011.

My mother (ones I have recollection of):
1964 Ford Country Squire 6-seat wagon/352 V8 (owned 1966-1971), 1968 Pontiac LeMans convertible/350 V8 (owned 1971-1976), fore-mentioned (see my father's listing) 1971 Ford LTD Brougham coupe/351W V8 (owned 1976-1979), 1977 Ford LTD II sedan/351W V8 (owned 1979-1987), 1987 Ford Escort GL 5dr. hatchback/automatic (owned 1987-1995, totaled while parked on the street), 1994 Ford Escort LX 3dr. hatchback/automatic (owned 1995-2003, totaled at a 3-way intersection), 2001 Ford Escort SE sedan (former rental, owned 2003-2016, totaled in a collision circa June 2016). She hasn't driven since last June.

My brother (excluding parts cars, note: first few cars were project vehicles were purchased <I>prior</I> to his getting his driver's license circa 1979; from 1994 onward, I include vehicles he bought for his wife since there was a back-on-forth ownership):
1967 Chevy Impala SS convertible/350 V8 (owned 1977-1978, never registered & wasn't old enough to have a license), the fore-mentioned (see my father's listing) 1969 Ford Country Squire 6-seat wagon /390 V8 (owned 1978 not registered under his ownership & wasn't old enough to drive), 1967 Pontiac Catalina sedan 400/V8 (owned 1978-1979, not registered & last vehicle bought prior to getting his license), 1960 Cadillac Sedan DeVille/6-window hardtop (owned 1979-1980, not registered), 1970 Cadillac Coupe DeVille (owned 1980, not registered), fore-mentioned (see my father's & mother's listings) 1971 Ford LTD Brougham coupe/351 V8 (owned 1980-1981, damaged in an accident & vandalized about 2 weeks later), 1971 Ford Country Squire 6-seat wagon/390 V8 (owned 1981-1982, never registered), 1969 Buick Electra 225 4dr. hardtop/455 (owned 1982, never registered) 1971 Chrysler Newport 4-dr. hardtop/383 V8 (owned 1981-1982), 1971 Buick Skylark 2dr. hardtop/350 V8 (owned 1982-1983), 1974 Mercury Marquis 4-dr. pillared hardtop/460 (owned 1983-1986), 1979 Olds Ninety-Eight Regency coupe/350 V8 (owned 1985-1986), 1986 Ford Escort L 3dr. hatchback/5-speed manual (owned 1986-1989), 1972 Ford Galaxie 500 sedan/240 inline-6 (owned 1985-1986), 1976 Mercury Marquis sedan (owned 1986-1987, ductwork caught fire), 1978 Olds Cutlass Cruiser wagon/260 V8 (owned 1987-1989), 1978 Ford LTD Landau sedan/351M V8 (never registered, owned 1989), 1989 Ford F-150 XLT-Lariat standard cab (3-seater)/2WD 300 inline-6, 5-speed manual (owned 1989-1990), 1979 Mercury Cougar XR-7/302 (owned 1990-1992), 1984 Buick LeSabre sedan/3.8L V6 (owned 1992-1994), 1972 Buick Centurion convertible/455 (owned 1993-1995), 1986 Pontiac Safari 8-seat wagon (owned 1994-1996), 1983 Chevy Caprice Estate 8-seat wagon/305 V8 (owned 1996-1997), 1986 Mercury Colony Park 8-seat wagon (owned 1997-1998), 1988 Ford Country Squire 8-seat wagon (owned 1998-2002), 1997 Ford Ranger standard cab/2WD 4-cylinder manual (owned 1997-1998 totaled in a collision), 1998 Ford Ranger standard cab/2WD 4-cylinder manual (owned 1998-2004), 1995 Ford Taurus GL 8-seat wagon (owned 2001-2005), 1998 Mercury Sable 8-seat wagon (owned 2005-2009), 2004 Mazda B-series pickup/super-cab/2WD 4-cylinder manual (owned 2004-2006), 2006 Nissan Frontier super-cab pickup/2WD 4-cylinder manual (owned 2006-2008), 1987 Lincoln Town Car (owned 2007-2008), 1990 Nissan Sentra coupe/manual (owned 2008-2010), 1990 Ford Crown Victoria sedan (owned 2008-2010), 2003 Ford Taurus SE sedan (owned 2009-2016), 1998 Chevy Cavalier coupe/4-cylinder manual (owned since 2010), 2001 Ford Ranger Super-Cap/2WD 4-cylinder (owned since 2016), 1987 Ford LTD Crown Victoria S sedan (owned since 2016), 2005 Mercury Grand Marquis-Park Lane Edition (owned since 2016).
"TransEastern! You'll feel like you've never left the ground because we treat you like dirt!" SNL Parady ad circa 1981
 
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TWA772LR
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Thu Feb 02, 2017 5:16 pm

My parents drive cars until the wheels fall off or they just plain-old blow up on you.
I grew up with:
-1987 Mazda B2200 stick shift truck, that we got rid of in 2004!
-*unknown year* Hyundai *unknown model* that was cursed to no end. My parents insurance guy actually recommended to leave the car in a bad part of town with the key in the ignition and the windows down. They did. And no one took it!!!
-*unknown year* red Isuzu Rodeo. That was the first family car I remember us buying from my childhood. It was a rental until we got our Dodge Ram.
-1997 Dodge Ram sport with a V8 magnum, that my dad still drives to this day!!!
-2003 Nissan Altima that they got rid of in 2012
-2013 Mazda 3, that's their Altima replacement.

I've only had one car, my lovely 2003 Honda Accord LX V6 that I bought from my sister-in-law.
When wasn't America great?


The thoughts and opinions shared under this username are mine and are not influenced by my employer.
 
mham001
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Thu Feb 02, 2017 6:43 pm

First car I remember crawling around. 1953 Plymouth

Image

This was the first and possibly only car he ever purchased new. 1964 Pontiac LeMans. I think he always regretted not going for the GTO but it was a 326 with a 4 speed and he had the valves reworked. Always the second "good" car, I think it is still parked in the garage.

Image

This replaced the Plymouth
Image

...and was replaced by this
Image

and then this...
Image
 
mham001
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Thu Feb 02, 2017 6:48 pm

My aunt had this new, I spent some time riding in the back space...1964 Corvette

Image

First vehicle I drove alone, on the Yakima Indian reservation, grandfather's Datsun pickup...

Image
 
B777LRF
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Thu Feb 02, 2017 10:27 pm

The first car I can recall was a FIAT 128, a 3-door coupe that looked rather good. The body was, however, primarily corrosion held together by a thin veneer of paint, and I still remember it leaving us stranded on more than one occasion. Not disparaged by the horrendous reliability that was Italian motors in the 70s and 80s, dad moved us into an Alfa Sud - the sporty 1.5L version. One night he left it outside, it started raining, and next day all that was left was a pile of rust. More or less. That was his last Italian car, and he got a Datsun Cherry 1,5, the luxury model with blue velvet interior and heated rear windscreen! It was endlessly boring, but also endlessly reliable, and started a love affair with Japanese motors which lasted for the rest of his life, and went on to encompass Toyota, Nissan and Mazda.

My first car was a Citroen Dyane, a horrible piece of corrugated iron mounted on a bed of sponges. It was replaced by a Ford Fiesta, probably the fastst 1.1 litre ever to grace this planet. The boot was filled with a set of living room speakers, leaving room for nothing else. On a good day, the stereo could run the battery flat in less than 30 minutes. After that came another Fiesta, then an Alfa 156, an Audi A4, BMW 320d, Mini Cooper, BMW 320d again, BMW 530d, Porsche Boxster and now I'm in a Mazda 6.

My GF is in love with the Jag F-Pace, which does look like a lovely piece of kit. Way outside budget ATM though, but let's see what the used market says in a few years time.
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prebennorholm
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Re: The cars of your childhood

Sat Feb 04, 2017 3:20 am

During my childhood we had no family car. There wasn't many cars here in Denmark at that time, some 2 or 3% of today's numbers.

One certain Herr Hitler had recently destroyed the country. The Marshall Plan was doing good - very good - to the economy, but the donator, Uncle Sam, said that the money should not so much be spent on holidays and import of "luxury cars", but rather on rebuilding the industries so hard work could rebuild our country. The government agreed and responded with an almost prohibitive tax on new, non-commercial cars.

But granddad had in 1936 bought his third used car, a 1926 Ford Model T. We sometimes made short tours in that car. In 1955 he exchanged it with a 1930 Ford A, which he unfortunately totalled and exchanged with a 1931 Ford A. I remember how granddad bitched over the Ford A compared to the T model. The A model had three pedals, while the T model had only two. How on earth could Mr. Ford make a car with three pedals when God had created man with only two legs?

In 1967 I got my driving license and bought a brand new Mini. Now granddad (around 90 years old) was ocationally a passenger in my car, as he was in dad's second hand 1965 Morris Minor. I would give an arm for having one of these cars today.
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