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wiggy
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Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:14 am

hi all today I went down a few waterslides outdoors and I'm terribly sun burnt. what is the best cream to use?
Last edited by SQ22 on Wed Jan 02, 2019 6:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
L410Turbolet
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Re: sunburns

Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:23 am

Ahava Aftersun Rehydrating Balm Body & Face
 
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qf789
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Re: sunburns

Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:24 am

I would stay away from creams for the time being. You can get an Aloe Vera spray by banana boat which you just spray on which helps take the heat out of the burn or another way is to cut a tomato in half and rub it over the burn, the acid in the tomato takes away the heat in the burn. After the heat has gone then use something like a moisturizer cream so the skin doesn’t dry out
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wiggy
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Re: sunburns

Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:45 am

qf789 wrote:
I would stay away from creams for the time being. You can get an Aloe Vera spray by banana boat which you just spray on which helps take the heat out of the burn or another way is to cut a tomato in half and rub it over the burn, the acid in the tomato takes away the heat in the burn. After the heat has gone then use something like a moisturizer cream so the skin doesn’t dry out




well so far i've been useing burnaid and nivea after sun spray with aloe vera
 
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fallap
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Re: sunburns

Wed Jan 02, 2019 11:23 am

Aftersun creme with aloe vera is a good place to start, and remember to drink plentiful in order to replenish the water your body uses to treat the burn.
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wiggy
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Re: sunburns

Wed Jan 02, 2019 11:27 am

yes
 
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mbmbos
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Re: sunburns

Wed Jan 02, 2019 1:45 pm

I too agree you should avoid lotions and oils for a few days. A vinegar bath will take the fever out of a sunburn. Aloe Vera can moisturize and heal a burned area, whereas oils are contraindicated immediately after skin has been burned.
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johns624
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Re: sunburns

Wed Jan 02, 2019 2:02 pm

Use sunscreen in the future.
 
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casinterest
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Re: sunburns

Wed Jan 02, 2019 2:17 pm

Aloe Vera is the best relief.
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Re: sunburns

Wed Jan 02, 2019 4:08 pm

Use an aloe product with lidocaine. The lidocaine helps numb the pain while you wait it out. Drink lots of fluid, if your burn is bad enough it's going to make you feel feverish and should be treated the same as a fever (aka drink fluid, take pain relievers, give it a few days)
 
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EstherLouise
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Re: sunburns

Wed Jan 02, 2019 6:19 pm

Use a cream or lotion with benzocaine in it.
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Flighty
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Wed Jan 02, 2019 8:21 pm

When I was younger I did not fully understand how damaging the sun really is. Many people think they are "aging" when in fact, they are just sun damaged. Most important solution is, do not get sunburned. Best wishes.
 
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DocLightning
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Wed Jan 02, 2019 9:39 pm

The best cure for sunburn is not to get it in the first place. Wear sunblock next time.
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Kent350787
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:03 pm

DocLightning wrote:
The best cure for sunburn is not to get it in the first place. Wear sunblock next time.


As an Australian, this. We've been screwed by the ozone hole, which at least is reducing in size.

But, if you're silly enough to get a burn, totally agree about aloe vera spray.
 
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TWA772LR
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:04 pm

Ive worked outside for hours on end for a job I had in college. Preventative care as Doc suggested is the best I'm very fair skinned and had to get SPF100 after learning the hard way. Even wear it under your clothes if you're not wearing any that have an SPF (SPF50 long sleeved rashguards are God's gift to fair skin people).

The next best thing is to use aloe spray and lay under a ceiling fan, as well as drinking water and using lotion.
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afcjets
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:20 pm

I would use 100 pct aloe vera. As far as prevention, upto 10 to 15 mins per day of unprotected sun is great for your health, vit D is so important and the sun is far superior to any supplement if you can get it. Also the first 10 mins or so your skin releases antioxidants to protect itself which are great for your skin. It still probably continues to release them but at some point (not long either) the sun exposure overwhelms it's ability to protect itself and you get skin damage. This base protects you more from exposure in the near future. If you are staying out longer, use a natural or physical sunscreen (active ingredient will say zinc oxide or titanium dioxide). Chemical sunscreens which are most common actually can promote skin cancer. Some chemical sunscreens in the US are actually banned in Europe.
 
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Wed Jan 02, 2019 10:46 pm

As someone else noted; Vinegar first, then aloe.

The vinegar stopped the "burn" reaction and then aloe soothes and helps heal.

Yes, the best thing is "don't burn, stay out of the sun or wear protection" but if it happens, the above works best for me so far.

Tugg
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:22 am

afcjets wrote:
Chemical sunscreens which are most common actually can promote skin cancer.


There is no scientifically accepted evidence to support this statement.
 
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Thu Jan 03, 2019 4:33 am

Kent350787 wrote:
afcjets wrote:
Chemical sunscreens which are most common actually can promote skin cancer.


There is no scientifically accepted evidence to support this statement.



“Do Chemical Sunscreens Increase Cancer Risk?

Worldwide, the greatest rise in melanoma has been experienced in countries where chemical sunscreens have been heavily promoted The rise in melanoma has been exceptionally high in Queensland, Australia where the medical establishment has vigorously promoted the use of sunscreens. Queensland now has more incidences of melanoma per capita than any other place on Earth.

Dr. Gordon Ainsleigh in California believes that the use of sunscreen causes more cancer deaths than it prevents. He estimates that the 17% increase in breast cancer observed between 1981 and 1992 may be the result of the pervasive use of sunscreens over the past decade. Recent studies have also shown a higher rate of melanoma among men who regularly use sunscreens and a higher rate of basal cell carcinoma among women using sunscreens

Drs. Cedric and Frank Garland of the University of California have pointed out that while sunscreens do protect against sunburn, there is no scientific proof that they protect against melanoma or basal cell carcinoma in humans4. The Garlands believe that the increased use of chemical sunscreens is the primary cause of the skin cancer epidemic. There is, however, some evidence that regular use of sunscreens helps prevent the formation of actinic keratoses, the precursors of squamous cell carcinoma.

In February 1998, epidemiologist Marianne Berwick of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York presented a careful analysis of data on sunscreen use and skin cancer at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Sunscreens may not protect against skin cancer, including melanoma, she concluded. "We don't really know whether sunscreens prevent skin cancer," said Berwick.

She looked first at four studies of squamous cell cancer, a cancer that appears on the head, neck, and arms but is usually not lethal. Two of the studies concluded that sunscreen protected against a skin condition thought to precede squamous cell cancer while two other studies reported that sunscreen did not shield people from this type of skin cancer.

She then analyzed two studies of basal cell carcinoma, another nonlethal skin cancer that is the most common form of skin cancer and appears most frequently on the head, neck, and arms. Those two studies found that people who used sunscreen were more likely to develop basal cell cancer than people who did not.

She then analyzed 10 studies of melanoma, the skin cancer is the most deadly. Melanoma often starts in or near moles on the skin. In five of the melanoma studies, people who used sunscreen were more likely than nonusers to develop melanoma. In three of the studies, there was no association between sunscreen use and melanoma. In the final two studies, people who used sunscreen seemed to be protected.”

"After examining the available epidemiological data and conducting our own large case-control population-based study, we have found no relationship between sunscreen use at any age and the development of melanoma skin cancer," said Dr. Berwick. Although sunscreens do prevent sunburn, Dr. Berwick concluded that sunburn itself is not the direct cause of cancer. Dr. Berwick objected to the universal blanket advice about using sunscreens during all time spent outdoors.

Dr. Berwick previously conducted a 1996 study that found no link between sunscreen use at any age and the development of melanoma. The same study also found no relationship between a history of sunburn and the development of melanoma.

Berwick continued saying that the relationship between sunscreen use and the development of skin cancer is complicated by evidence that people who are sensitive to the sun engage in fewer activities in the bright sun and wear sunscreen when they do.

But if these people develop melanoma, it may be because they are genetically susceptible and likely to develop skin cancer regardless of the amount of sunlight exposure or protection from sunscreen.

"Based on the evidence, we conclude that sunburn itself probably does not cause melanoma, but that it is an important sign of excessive sun exposure particularly among those who are genetically susceptible because of their skin-type," said Dr. Berwick. The melanoma risk for people with numerous moles was six times higher than that of someone with only a few moles.

Persons most at risk for melanoma are those with red or blond hair and lighter colored eyes. Such light-skinned people have almost six times more melanoma than persons with darker skin. "The evidence indicates that chronic sun exposure may be protective for the development of melanoma because the skin has adapted to the sun, having become thicker as it has tanned.

On the other hand, intermittent sun exposure appears to increase risk, making it much less protective," added Dr. Berwick. "People need to focus on their individual risk characteristics, such as their pigmentary phenotype, their family history, and the type and number of moles they have.

I recommend that people avoid the sun when they are clearly at high risk and that they should enjoy a reasonable amount of outdoor activities with less anxiety when they are clearly at reduced risk," advised Dr. Berwick.

After Dr. Berwick's presentation of this data, the American Academy of Dermatology (ADA) issued a press release attacking her work. The then president of the ADA insulted her as a "number crunching scientist". But then, all scientists spend a lot of time crunching numbers.

Studies have found that the incidence of skin cancers has increased even as sunscreens have become popular among fair-skinned people. The establishment answer to this increase in the cancer rate is that wearing sunscreen makes people stay in the sun too long. A study by Drs. Mike Brown (Kate Law of the Cancer Research Campaign) Philippe Autier (European Institute of Oncology in Milan) reported that children using sunscreen returned from holiday with more skin moles - a possible sign of increased cancer risk.

Some say that people who wore higher factor sunscreens tend to stay out in sunlight much longer, because they fell protected. However, others have pointed out that if sunscreen chemicals were protective, the factors of longer sun exposure would be somewhat countered by the sunscreen's supposed protective actions.“

http://suntanscience.com/cancer&chemicals.php
 
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Thu Jan 03, 2019 4:54 am

afcjets wrote:
Kent350787 wrote:
afcjets wrote:
Chemical sunscreens which are most common actually can promote skin cancer.


There is no scientifically accepted evidence to support this statement.



“Do Chemical Sunscreens Increase Cancer Risk?

Worldwide, the greatest rise in melanoma has been experienced in countries where chemical sunscreens have been heavily promoted The rise in melanoma has been exceptionally high in Queensland, Australia where the medical establishment has vigorously promoted the use of sunscreens. Queensland now has more incidences of melanoma per capita than any other place on Earth.

Dr. Gordon Ainsleigh in California believes that the use of sunscreen causes more cancer deaths than it prevents. He estimates that the 17% increase in breast cancer observed between 1981 and 1992 may be the result of the pervasive use of sunscreens over the past decade. Recent studies have also shown a higher rate of melanoma among men who regularly use sunscreens and a higher rate of basal cell carcinoma among women using sunscreens

Drs. Cedric and Frank Garland of the University of California have pointed out that while sunscreens do protect against sunburn, there is no scientific proof that they protect against melanoma or basal cell carcinoma in humans4. The Garlands believe that the increased use of chemical sunscreens is the primary cause of the skin cancer epidemic. There is, however, some evidence that regular use of sunscreens helps prevent the formation of actinic keratoses, the precursors of squamous cell carcinoma.

In February 1998, epidemiologist Marianne Berwick of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York presented a careful analysis of data on sunscreen use and skin cancer at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Sunscreens may not protect against skin cancer, including melanoma, she concluded. "We don't really know whether sunscreens prevent skin cancer," said Berwick.

She looked first at four studies of squamous cell cancer, a cancer that appears on the head, neck, and arms but is usually not lethal. Two of the studies concluded that sunscreen protected against a skin condition thought to precede squamous cell cancer while two other studies reported that sunscreen did not shield people from this type of skin cancer.

She then analyzed two studies of basal cell carcinoma, another nonlethal skin cancer that is the most common form of skin cancer and appears most frequently on the head, neck, and arms. Those two studies found that people who used sunscreen were more likely to develop basal cell cancer than people who did not.

She then analyzed 10 studies of melanoma, the skin cancer is the most deadly. Melanoma often starts in or near moles on the skin. In five of the melanoma studies, people who used sunscreen were more likely than nonusers to develop melanoma. In three of the studies, there was no association between sunscreen use and melanoma. In the final two studies, people who used sunscreen seemed to be protected.”

"After examining the available epidemiological data and conducting our own large case-control population-based study, we have found no relationship between sunscreen use at any age and the development of melanoma skin cancer," said Dr. Berwick. Although sunscreens do prevent sunburn, Dr. Berwick concluded that sunburn itself is not the direct cause of cancer. Dr. Berwick objected to the universal blanket advice about using sunscreens during all time spent outdoors.

Dr. Berwick previously conducted a 1996 study that found no link between sunscreen use at any age and the development of melanoma. The same study also found no relationship between a history of sunburn and the development of melanoma.

Berwick continued saying that the relationship between sunscreen use and the development of skin cancer is complicated by evidence that people who are sensitive to the sun engage in fewer activities in the bright sun and wear sunscreen when they do.

But if these people develop melanoma, it may be because they are genetically susceptible and likely to develop skin cancer regardless of the amount of sunlight exposure or protection from sunscreen.

"Based on the evidence, we conclude that sunburn itself probably does not cause melanoma, but that it is an important sign of excessive sun exposure particularly among those who are genetically susceptible because of their skin-type," said Dr. Berwick. The melanoma risk for people with numerous moles was six times higher than that of someone with only a few moles.

Persons most at risk for melanoma are those with red or blond hair and lighter colored eyes. Such light-skinned people have almost six times more melanoma than persons with darker skin. "The evidence indicates that chronic sun exposure may be protective for the development of melanoma because the skin has adapted to the sun, having become thicker as it has tanned.

On the other hand, intermittent sun exposure appears to increase risk, making it much less protective," added Dr. Berwick. "People need to focus on their individual risk characteristics, such as their pigmentary phenotype, their family history, and the type and number of moles they have.

I recommend that people avoid the sun when they are clearly at high risk and that they should enjoy a reasonable amount of outdoor activities with less anxiety when they are clearly at reduced risk," advised Dr. Berwick.

After Dr. Berwick's presentation of this data, the American Academy of Dermatology (ADA) issued a press release attacking her work. The then president of the ADA insulted her as a "number crunching scientist". But then, all scientists spend a lot of time crunching numbers.

Studies have found that the incidence of skin cancers has increased even as sunscreens have become popular among fair-skinned people. The establishment answer to this increase in the cancer rate is that wearing sunscreen makes people stay in the sun too long. A study by Drs. Mike Brown (Kate Law of the Cancer Research Campaign) Philippe Autier (European Institute of Oncology in Milan) reported that children using sunscreen returned from holiday with more skin moles - a possible sign of increased cancer risk.

Some say that people who wore higher factor sunscreens tend to stay out in sunlight much longer, because they fell protected. However, others have pointed out that if sunscreen chemicals were protective, the factors of longer sun exposure would be somewhat countered by the sunscreen's supposed protective actions.“

http://suntanscience.com/cancer&chemicals.php

So you are agreeing with Kent350787.... interesting. But decent of you.

Tugg
I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. - W. Shatner
Productivity isn’t about getting more things done, rather it’s about getting the right things done, while doing less. - M. Oshin
 
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Jouhou
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Thu Jan 03, 2019 5:02 am

From what I've seen of the carcinogens-in-sunscreen hypothesis, it was a specific active ingredient that was suspect, not all sunscreens. I don't feel like doing any Google research on it though.
 
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wiggy
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Thu Jan 03, 2019 7:59 am

looks like aloe vera is a winner this thread can be delated now
 
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wiggy
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Thu Jan 03, 2019 8:03 am

no more comments ignore the disscusution
 
afcjets
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Thu Jan 03, 2019 2:09 pm

Tugger wrote:

So you are agreeing with Kent350787.... interesting. But decent of you.

Tugg


No, my inclination is to believe the Harvard and University of Zurich studies, the National Institute of Health, and not use chemical sunscreens which are banned in all of Europe, Canada, and Australia because they are carcinogenic. At least in the US we have access to both types of sunscreens, I am choosing the ones where no studies show they cause cancer.

Maybe one day the same chemical subscreens banned in Europe, Canada, and Australia will be banned in the US too. It only took 14 years for psoralen sunscreen in the US to be banned in 1996 after the 1982 NIH study.

“Therefore the use of phototoxic psoralens in over-the-counter sunscreens is inappropriate because of the risk of increased UV-induced skin cancer.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7096664


“Most Chemical Sunscreens in the U. S. are Banned Elsewhere

In 1997, Europe, Canada, and Australia changed sunscreens to use three specific active sunscreen ingredients - avobenzone (Parsol 1789), titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide - as the base.

In the US, the cosmetic companies have held off this policy as they try to sell off their stockpiles of cosmetics containing sunscreens banned in other countries. Many scientists have presented evidence that chemical sunscreens may increase your risk of cancers of the breast, ovaries, prostrate and colon.

Many common sunscreen chemicals also have estrogen-like effects. Margaret Schlumpf from the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, found that they trigger developmental abnormalities in rats. Her research team tested six common UV screening chemicals used in sunscreens, lipsticks and other cosmetics.

All five tested UVB screens -benzophenone-3, homosalate, 4-methyl-benzylidene camphor (4-MBC), octyl-methoxycinnamate and octyl-dimethyl-PABA - acted like estrogen in lab tests and caused cancer cells to grow more rapidly. One of the most common sunscreens, 4-MBC, when mixed with olive oil and applied to rat skin, caused a doubling of the rate of uterine growth well before puberty.

"That was scary, because we used concentrations that are in the range allowed in sunscreens," said Schlumpf.”


http://suntanscience.com/healthdisaster.php
 
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einsteinboricua
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Re: sunburns

Thu Jan 03, 2019 7:19 pm

L410Turbolet wrote:
Ahava Aftersun Rehydrating Balm Body & Face

I had to read this many times because I thought it said aftershave. :covereyes:
"You haven't seen a tree until you've seen its shadow from the sky."
 
bunumuring
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Sat Jan 05, 2019 12:22 pm

Hey guys,
Aloe Vera definitely helps, as many here have said. Also drink as much water as you can.
I have had numerous 'things' cut out of my scalp, back and left thigh due to youthful enthusiasm without wearing sunscreen. I'm paranoid about it now.
Wear sunscreen everyone. Ignore the ignorants. Nothing is as worse as having that 'melanoma' diagnosis when it could've been easily prevented.
Cheers
Bunumuring
PS I'm curious... Where were the water slides? Wet n Wild?
I just wanna live while I'm alive!
 
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Jouhou
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Sun Jan 06, 2019 8:47 am

afcjets wrote:
Tugger wrote:

So you are agreeing with Kent350787.... interesting. But decent of you.

Tugg


No, my inclination is to believe the Harvard and University of Zurich studies, the National Institute of Health, and not use chemical sunscreens which are banned in all of Europe, Canada, and Australia because they are carcinogenic. At least in the US we have access to both types of sunscreens, I am choosing the ones where no studies show they cause cancer.

Maybe one day the same chemical subscreens banned in Europe, Canada, and Australia will be banned in the US too. It only took 14 years for psoralen sunscreen in the US to be banned in 1996 after the 1982 NIH study.

“Therefore the use of phototoxic psoralens in over-the-counter sunscreens is inappropriate because of the risk of increased UV-induced skin cancer.”

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7096664


“Most Chemical Sunscreens in the U. S. are Banned Elsewhere

In 1997, Europe, Canada, and Australia changed sunscreens to use three specific active sunscreen ingredients - avobenzone (Parsol 1789), titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide - as the base.

In the US, the cosmetic companies have held off this policy as they try to sell off their stockpiles of cosmetics containing sunscreens banned in other countries. Many scientists have presented evidence that chemical sunscreens may increase your risk of cancers of the breast, ovaries, prostrate and colon.

Many common sunscreen chemicals also have estrogen-like effects. Margaret Schlumpf from the Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, found that they trigger developmental abnormalities in rats. Her research team tested six common UV screening chemicals used in sunscreens, lipsticks and other cosmetics.

All five tested UVB screens -benzophenone-3, homosalate, 4-methyl-benzylidene camphor (4-MBC), octyl-methoxycinnamate and octyl-dimethyl-PABA - acted like estrogen in lab tests and caused cancer cells to grow more rapidly. One of the most common sunscreens, 4-MBC, when mixed with olive oil and applied to rat skin, caused a doubling of the rate of uterine growth well before puberty.

"That was scary, because we used concentrations that are in the range allowed in sunscreens," said Schlumpf.”


http://suntanscience.com/healthdisaster.php


You don't have to buy sunscreens containing those chemicals you know. Also UVA is worse for you than UVB. It's UVB that your body can utilize limited doses of. UVA just burns you. Just buying the European style sunscreens is fine, the real reason manufacturers in the US don't opt for them if they aren't forced to is because they leave a visible film on your skin.
 
afcjets
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Sun Jan 06, 2019 4:16 pm

Jouhou wrote:
You don't have to buy sunscreens containing those chemicals you know.


Yes, I know...

afcjets wrote:
If you are staying out longer, use a natural or physical sunscreen (active ingredient will say zinc oxide or titanium dioxide).


afcjets wrote:
At least in the US we have access to both types of sunscreens, I am choosing the ones where no studies show they cause cancer.


Jouhou wrote:
Also UVA is worse for you than UVB. It's UVB that your body can utilize limited doses of. UVA just burns you. Just buying the European style sunscreens is fine, the real reason manufacturers in the US don't opt for them if they aren't forced to is because they leave a visible film on your skin.


No, UVB burns you. UVA tans you. Excessive UVB resulting in sunburn is what can cause skin cancer, however skin damage and wrinkles comes more from UVA. Again though a few minutes of daily unprotected sun though is healthy and good for your skin and more importantly overall health.

Physical or natural sunscreens such as titanium dioxide use micronized particles which are barely visible on the skin or completely invisible if you rub them in good or have other ingredients to make them absorb better. Besides, titanium dioxide is the main ingredient in makeup which gives it its cover so it’s not like it is going to look bad even if you don’t rub it in completely, unless you don’t apply it evenly.
Last edited by afcjets on Sun Jan 06, 2019 4:33 pm, edited 2 times in total.
 
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Jouhou
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Sun Jan 06, 2019 4:25 pm

afcjets wrote:
Jouhou wrote:
You don't have to buy sunscreens containing those chemicals you know.


Yes, I know...

afcjets wrote:
If you are staying out longer, use a natural or physical sunscreen (active ingredient will say zinc oxide or titanium dioxide).


afcjets wrote:
At least in the US we have access to both types of sunscreens, I am choosing the ones where no studies show they cause cancer.


Jouhou wrote:
Also UVA is worse for you than UVB. It's UVB that your body can utilize limited doses of. UVA just burns you. Just buying the European style sunscreens is fine, the real reason manufacturers in the US don't opt for them if they aren't forced to is because they leave a visible film on your skin.


No, UVB burns you. UVA tans you. UVB resulting in sunburn is what can cause skin cancer, however skin damage and wrinkles comes more from UVA. Again though a few minutes of daily unprotected sun though is healthy and good for the skin.


I can't say I'm an expert in the matter, I'm awake during the night and also tan well so I get sunburned 0-1 times a year and haven't needed to use sunscreen in about 6 years. I do recommend a night shift for avoiding both sunburns and avoiding sunscreen at the same time!
 
NIKV69
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Sun Jan 06, 2019 7:01 pm

Tugger wrote:
As someone else noted; Vinegar first, then aloe.

The vinegar stopped the "burn" reaction and then aloe soothes and helps heal.

Yes, the best thing is "don't burn, stay out of the sun or wear protection" but if it happens, the above works best for me so far.

Tugg


Yep this works real good. Also what I do right after the burn is cover my whole body in Noxema it cools and soothes the burn. Lay in bed with air conditioning on high for a while. Then get into an ice cold shower to wash it off then pat dry and do above.
Nikon from day one, Nikon till I die,
 
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Tugger
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Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Sun Jan 06, 2019 7:52 pm

afcjets wrote:
Physical or natural sunscreens such as titanium dioxide use micronized particles

Of course then you are into whole other potentially harmful product.... micronized particles. Don't use spray sunsceen (and I never do because I can't stand the waste), the studies show that inhaled titanium dioxide micronized particles can be carcinogenic.

Tugg
I don’t know that I am unafraid to be myself, but it is hard to be somebody else. - W. Shatner
Productivity isn’t about getting more things done, rather it’s about getting the right things done, while doing less. - M. Oshin
 
bunumuring
Posts: 2531
Joined: Wed Jan 15, 2014 2:56 pm

Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Mon Jan 07, 2019 3:27 am

Wow!
I am learning so much - seriously! - from the info being presented in this thread. Thanks guys!
Melanoma is a huge problem here in Australia and I smugly believed that 'we' were highly educated about everything to do with sun protection and skin cancer... Kids learn from preschool in mandatory lessons to 'slip slop slap' and so on, all all schools have sun safe policies to minimise harm to children's skin.
I am lucky to have had melanomas and 'pre'melanomas caught and removed early enough to prevent death and I drive my family crazy with my fanaticism about sun safety. I apply some form of sunscreen daily every day of the year and at least twice a day during the hottest months of December, January and February. I also apply after-sun lotions after spending time outdoors during summer or at the beach. I am really happy that my family also do this as part of the natural order of things.
The last sentence of Tugg's post above worries me as spray sunscreen is the type most used by my teenage sons.... I had no idea of the dangers involved!
Thanks to all for their contributions,
Bunumuring
I just wanna live while I'm alive!
 
Olddog
Posts: 1199
Joined: Sat Jun 25, 2016 4:41 pm

Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Mon Jan 07, 2019 4:17 pm

In france, I would suggest to get some Biafine and you should be fine.
When UK was in it wanted a lot of opt-outs, now it is out it wants opt-ins
 
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wiggy
Topic Author
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Joined: Sat Jun 16, 2018 9:23 am

Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Wed Jan 09, 2019 7:02 am

can a moderator please remove the thread its getting out of control
 
BlueberryWheats
Posts: 534
Joined: Tue Sep 08, 2015 9:46 am

Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Wed Jan 09, 2019 7:13 am

wiggy wrote:
can a moderator please remove the thread its getting out of control


... in what way? It's still perfectly on topic.
 
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SQ22
Moderator
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Joined: Sat Feb 25, 2012 9:29 am

Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:46 pm

BlueberryWheats wrote:
wiggy wrote:
can a moderator please remove the thread its getting out of control


... in what way? It's still perfectly on topic.


Usually we are not posting when threads are running fine, but here I do agree.
 
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trpmb6
Posts: 2625
Joined: Thu Apr 19, 2018 5:45 pm

Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Wed Jan 09, 2019 6:12 pm

SQ22 wrote:
BlueberryWheats wrote:
wiggy wrote:
can a moderator please remove the thread its getting out of control


... in what way? It's still perfectly on topic.


Usually we are not posting when threads are running fine, but here I do agree.


The only offtopic post... would be the post asking to have it removed. Irony.

Wait.. now we've derailed the thread.. it's self fulfilling! Oh nooooo!!!
 
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wiggy
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Joined: Sat Jun 16, 2018 9:23 am

Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Thu Jan 10, 2019 6:39 am

BlueberryWheats wrote:
wiggy wrote:
can a moderator please remove the thread its getting out of control


... in what way? It's still perfectly on topic.[


well why ask for my civil aviation threads to not delated but not this
 
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wiggy
Topic Author
Posts: 277
Joined: Sat Jun 16, 2018 9:23 am

Re: Sunburns - What is the best medicine to use?

Thu Jan 10, 2019 6:40 am

from now on I'm going to ignore this thread

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