Page 1 of 1

Interesting Trend in Food at Sports Events

Posted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 4:28 pm
by casinterest
Interesting video report from CBS about pricing at stadiums in Atlanta.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GRuTxJMWiTg

$5 Beer
$2 Hot Dogs

And they seem to have increased their volume to make up for the loss.

This is a trend I like to see. As a father , I hold back on purchases and get my kids fed before I got to a stadium event as I know expensive prices prevent me from wanting to purchase items there.

This year when I went to a Carolina Panthers game, I was astounded when they had a refillable soda and refillable popcorn for a reasonable price.


Do you all think this trend will catch on, and would you be more likely to purchase more at the event rather than eat before or after it?

Re: Interesting Trend in Food at Sports Events

Posted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 4:58 pm
by NIKV69
Going to Vegas Knight games I can agree I pay $20 bucks for a beer with the tip!

Re: Interesting Trend in Food at Sports Events

Posted: Fri Feb 08, 2019 4:59 pm
by TSS
It's good to see stadiums abandoning the "captive audience" pricing model for refreshments, particularly when the refreshments are often the exact same thing you'd get at your local convenience store for a tiny fraction of the price. I'm okay with paying a reasonable premium for on-site food & drink, but when the premium charged starts to feel unabashedly predatory I pass entirely.

I'm curious as to whether movie theaters will follow this example.

Re: Interesting Trend in Food at Sports Events

Posted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 5:15 am
by NIKV69
TSS wrote:
It's good to see stadiums abandoning the "captive audience" pricing model for refreshments, particularly when the refreshments are often the exact same thing you'd get at your local convenience store for a tiny fraction of the price. I'm okay with paying a reasonable premium for on-site food & drink, but when the premium charged starts to feel unabashedly predatory I pass entirely.

I'm curious as to whether movie theaters will follow this example.


Unfortunately T-Mobile is total Vegas and doing that very thing. The prices are so high I actually save money by paying 80-100 dollars more for the ticket with lounge access upstairs and free food and drinks. I actually save a ton of money. That is just crazy! Beers are $16 each and forget Shake Shack and Pinks!

Re: Interesting Trend in Food at Sports Events

Posted: Sat Feb 09, 2019 5:38 am
by jetero
$5 for a beer and $2 for a hot dog sounds like the ideal price point for me.

As cas alluded to I doubt the revenues collected are appreciably different.

I also doubt the concessionaires make much money (margin wise) regardless.

I think it must be pretty difficult to staff and provision a 40,000 seat stadium, and there’s a clear upside or downside risk for the concessionaire which leads to the extortionate prices.

But I’m a baseball guy. Probably a slam dunk for football and a bit easier for basketball and hockey.

Re: Interesting Trend in Food at Sports Events

Posted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 10:43 am
by SCQ83
This also happens with airports. Something I love about London airports is that prices are largely the same than in the street. In Germany they go a step further and landside they have fully-stocked supermarkets at "high street prices" in airports like CGN or DUS. You see those places very crowded. I recall however a couple of years ago in Bucharest AIrport, they charged 4 euros for an espresso. It was like WTF; you can get 10 espressos for that price in the street. So I did not drink anything.

Re: Interesting Trend in Food at Sports Events

Posted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 12:24 pm
by melpax
Would love to see the big Melbourne stadiums do this, but won't happen unfortantely....

The MCG, Marvel Stadium, and Rod Laver arena contract out their catering, these outside caterers love to price gouge. I'll usually try to eat beforehand (and get a couple of beers in at a local pub as well...). Both MCG & Marvel only sell mid-strength alcohol in the 'public' areas. For 'full strength', you need to either be in a corporate box, or one of the member's bars or resturants......

Re: Interesting Trend in Food at Sports Events

Posted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 12:50 pm
by mchei
SCQ83 wrote:
In Germany they go a step further and landside they have fully-stocked supermarkets at "high street prices" in airports like CGN or DUS. You see those places very crowded.


True! In HAM there’s also a grocery store landside (Edeka).
I’ve seen small stores in ARN (Pressbyrån) landside as well but they’re much smaller and more like kiosks. However, they offer Hot Dogs at very reasonable prices. And if I remember it well, the same kiosks exist airside. But I don’t remember the prices.
In PHL, prices for food were okay-ish. A fresh burger was at around 10 dollars. In CPH you get a quarter of an old sandwich for this :)

Re: Interesting Trend in Food at Sports Events

Posted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 2:07 pm
by Kiwirob
NIKV69 wrote:
Going to Vegas Knight games I can agree I pay $20 bucks for a beer with the tip!


That’s expensive even by Norwegian standards plus we don’t get ripped off with the tipping on top.

Re: Interesting Trend in Food at Sports Events

Posted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 2:08 pm
by Kiwirob
TSS wrote:
It's good to see stadiums abandoning the "captive audience" pricing model for refreshments, particularly when the refreshments are often the exact same thing you'd get at your local convenience store for a tiny fraction of the price. I'm okay with paying a reasonable premium for on-site food & drink, but when the premium charged starts to feel unabashedly predatory I pass entirely.

I'm curious as to whether movie theaters will follow this example.


How about airports whilst you’re at it, the price gouging at airports is obscene.

Re: Interesting Trend in Food at Sports Events

Posted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 2:11 pm
by Kiwirob
mchei wrote:
SCQ83 wrote:
In Germany they go a step further and landside they have fully-stocked supermarkets at "high street prices" in airports like CGN or DUS. You see those places very crowded.


True! In HAM there’s also a grocery store landside (Edeka).
:)


Last year when I stayed at the radisson accross from the terminal I went to this store for some snacks, there were two hookers touting for business outside it.

Re: Interesting Trend in Food at Sports Events

Posted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 2:45 pm
by SCQ83
mchei wrote:
True! In HAM there’s also a grocery store landside (Edeka).


Edeka is ""cheaper"" for my taste. I like better REWE at CGN/DUS. Probably for US comparisons, it would something like Trader Joe's. Great to buy some food before/after flying. I also noticed when there, a lot of airport staff and FAs do their grocery shopping.

Kiwirob wrote:
How about airports whilst you’re at it, the price gouging at airports is obscene.


AENA (the Spanish airport operator) mandated that all airport shops must sell a 1-euro half a litre water option. So it is a good step in the right direction. It is also about finding out. For instance the McDonald's/McCafé in the land side in Madrid's T4 has high-street prices and promos (while Burger Kings airside - I personally hate BK - have higher prices). Great for a coffee before flying (McCafé's coffee in Europe is quite good). Recently I discovered a relatively new small bakery chain in Spain (Santa Gloria) that opened a couple of outlets in MAD. Shockingly they had high-street prices. Ironically I feel that is already like a sale, so in a captive environment like an airport, having "high street prices" helps you to eat/spend more since you don't feel like you are being ripped off every time you drink a coffee or eat a sandwich.

Re: Interesting Trend in Food at Sports Events

Posted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 4:07 pm
by BartSimpson
Kiwirob wrote:
Last year when I stayed at the radisson accross from the terminal I went to this store for some snacks, there were two hookers touting for business outside it.


Did they adjust their service fees to airport price ranges, too?

Re: Interesting Trend in Food at Sports Events

Posted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 4:39 pm
by jetwet1
NIKV69 wrote:
Going to Vegas Knight games I can agree I pay $20 bucks for a beer with the tip!


Take a look at the combo prices next time you go, the last time I was there, ordering a beer, hotdog and pretzel as a combo was $3 MORE than ordering them separately, I guess under the thought that it is so ingrained with people that a combo will always be cheaper they don't bother looking.

Re: Interesting Trend in Food at Sports Events

Posted: Sun Feb 10, 2019 6:36 pm
by NIKV69
Kiwirob wrote:

That’s expensive even by Norwegian standards plus we don’t get ripped off with the tipping on top.


Yea T-Mobile is $16 a beer. I forget what Yankee stadium or Met Life Stadium is but I am almost sure it's more. They don't rip off for tip, it's voluntary and I believe in tipping the guy if he comes to my seat. They work hard.

jetwet1 wrote:

Take a look at the combo prices next time you go, the last time I was there, ordering a beer, hotdog and pretzel as a combo was $3 MORE than ordering them separately, I guess under the thought that it is so ingrained with people that a combo will always be cheaper they don't bother looking.


Thanks but actually I have adopted a new system. I either get the ticket that includes the suites upstairs with unlimited food and beer or I eat dinner before the game and just get beer. It's just crazy!

Re: Interesting Trend in Food at Sports Events

Posted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 8:06 am
by jetwet1
NIKV69 wrote:
Thanks but actually I have adopted a new system. I either get the ticket that includes the suites upstairs with unlimited food and beer or I eat dinner before the game and just get beer. It's just crazy!


No doubt, i'm lucky in that my company has a suite there, I can normally find an excuse to go when my team is playing the Knights, I will say though, except for food/drink prices, T-Mobile is a great arena.

Re: Interesting Trend in Food at Sports Events

Posted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 8:27 am
by seb146
This is a great ploy. People can spend not very much on food early on in the event. Later on, they will see they have extra money and buy the big ticket items so they end up spending more and tell everyone how they got to eat the specialty things. From a marketing stand, it sounds great.