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zkojq
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RIP I. M. Pei 1917-2019

Fri May 17, 2019 12:09 pm

I. M. Pei, one of the most significant architects of the 20th Century has died in New York.

I M Pei, the architect behind buildings including the glass pyramid outside the Louvre in Paris, has died aged 102.

Tributes have been pouring in, remembering him for a lifetime of designing iconic structures worldwide. Pei's designs are renowned for their emphasis on precision geometry, plain surfaces and natural light. He carried on working well into old age, creating one of his most famous masterpieces - the Museum of Islamic Art in Doha, Qatar - in his 80s.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-48303529


Some of his works:

Louvre Pyramid
Image

Bank of China Tower - the best looking Skyscraper design ever, in my opinion.
Image

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library
Image

Rock and Roll Hall of Fame
Image

Suzhou Museum
Image
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northstardc4m
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Re: RIP I. M. Pei 1917-2019

Fri May 17, 2019 2:52 pm

"The architect who hated the right angle" as I heard him refered to on TV just now, and I guess that is at least partially true, he seemed to like triangles, arcs, hexagons etc... He made some very impressive buildings in his time, a true giant of 20th century architecture.

It's a pity most of his work at JFK has fallen to "progress" :(

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DL_Mech
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Re: RIP I. M. Pei 1917-2019

Sat May 18, 2019 12:57 am

National Airlines Sundrome
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Ken777
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Re: RIP I. M. Pei 1917-2019

Sat May 18, 2019 2:51 am

My cousin used to do renderings for Mr. Pei and Pei was his favorite Architect. My favorite rendering was his night setting of the Louvre Pyramid. I can remember reading about that work in Time and a lot of the good folks in Paris did NOT like the Pyramid at all - but time (and the increase in tourists) seems to have soften their view. Now they would riot if it was to be removed! Actually Pei did brilliant work on the Louvre. We went there a few years ago and the design was fantastic. It's an experience that everyone should enjoy.
 
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WarRI1
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Re: RIP I. M. Pei 1917-2019

Sat May 18, 2019 3:06 am

I have been to the JFK Library and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He left a mark for sure.
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Aaron747
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Re: RIP I. M. Pei 1917-2019

Sat May 18, 2019 3:09 am

Couldn’t agree more - in the 90s when the HK skyline was less intense, the Bank of China tower was an incredibly bold standout away from boxes and phallic shapes typical of skyscrapers. It has kind of lost its impact in the current context, but man, what a gorgeous building.
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melpax
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Re: RIP I. M. Pei 1917-2019

Sat May 18, 2019 8:18 am

Collins Place in Melbourne was designed by Pei, one of the first mixed-use developments in Australia. The Sofitel (originally the Regent) Hotel in the complex was one of a few hotels in the world with a 50th floor for many years. The design still holds up well today, nearly 40 years after completion.

Image

Image

https://www.collinsplace.com.au/our-place
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Airstud
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Re: RIP I. M. Pei 1917-2019

Sat May 18, 2019 8:38 am

I like the "Library Tower" in downtown Los Angeles.

(When I lived there it was called the First Interstate World Center :boggled: )
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Aesma
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Re: RIP I. M. Pei 1917-2019

Sat May 18, 2019 3:05 pm

RIP

I was only a kid when the Louvre pyramid was built so I can't give an opinion about the mood at the time, what I find funny is that this part of the palace wasn't even part of the museum, it was the finance ministry, so I can't see why people would care so much. The pyramid is striking of course, but more importantly it's an all new, large and practical entrance to the museum complex, a concept that has since been copied by other large museums.

An illustration about its place in today's Paris and France is that it was used by president Emmanuel Macron for his victory speech :

Image
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blacksoviet
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Legendary architect I.M. Pei has died at 102

Wed May 29, 2019 9:35 am

The Chinese architect was best known for his design of Kennedy Airport's National Airlines Sundrome, later known as Terminal 6. In 1992 President George H.W. Bush awarded Pei a Presidential Medal of Freedom for his contributions to modern architecture.

The Sundrome was built in 1969 and opened in 1970. It was the best terminal at JFK until 1997, when Terminal 1 was built.

The headhouse design was very elegant. Sixteen enormous cylindrical columns held up a white steel deep roof truss. This eliminated the need for load bearing walls. Exterior walls were made of green glass. The headhouse was transparent. You could look through the building from one side to the other.


https://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2011 ... y-airport/

The headhouse had a very high ceiling. The tall floor-to-ceiling windows allowed in much sunlight. The terminal had a single-level roadway. The departures curb was in front of the headhouse. The arrivals roadway snaked behind the headhouse to the baggage claim underneath the airside concourse. There were two pedestrian bridges over the arrivals roadway which connected the headhouse to the Central Concourse. Each bridge contained a security checkpoint giving the terminal a total of two TSA screening areas. The Sundrome was a domestic terminal. There was no FIS checkpoint. The terminal contained 14 gates. The airside building contained three concourses, the North Banjo, the Central Concourse and the South Banjo.

Pan American bought National Airlines in 1980 and began using the Sundrome as a domestic terminal. In 1985, TWA began using the terminal for their domestic flights. Around 1988, United began using the terminal for all of their transcon flights. In the late 1980s, America West also moved into the terminal. By 1995, United controlled the entire North Banjo and TWA controlled the entire South Banjo. In 2000, Jetblue began operating out of the terminal and by 2004 they had gained control of the entire terminal, forcing United to retreat back to Terminal 7.

In 2008, Jetblue abandoned Terminal 6 for their current terminal. The Port Authority continued to pay $600,000 a year to maintain the vacant terminal for three years. In 2011, the Port Authority decided to demolish the entire terminal under pressure from Jetblue. The demolition of Terminal 6 is the most significant loss of a transportation building in New York since Pennsylvania Station was razed in 1963.

Dave Barger was the CEO of Jetblue in 2011. I.M. Pei's colleague, Henry Cobb begged Barger to preserve the headhouse and incorporate it into the new Terminal 6. Barger refused, however he promised to champion a “permanent display of the pavilion photographs and other architectural artifacts so future generations can continue to appreciate the beauty of Terminal 6.”

Today the international wing of Terminal 5 occupies former Terminal 6 land. The rest of the site is used for equipment/vehicle storage and a 747 hardstand. Eventually a new Terminal 6/7 will be built on that land.
 
blacksoviet
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Re: RIP I. M. Pei 1917-2019

Wed May 29, 2019 10:13 am

DL_Mech wrote:
National Airlines Sundrome
Image

The Sundrome design looked much better than today's new terminals. All of the new terminals have dual-level roadways which spoil the view for cars and trains approaching the terminal.

The Sundrome design had the arrivals roadway behind the headhouse, in front of the airside concourse. I wish more terminals today used this design. It was very efficient. The Worldport used a similar design.
 
blacksoviet
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Re: Legendary architect I.M. Pei has died at 102

Wed May 29, 2019 10:19 am

Dave Barger claimed in 2011 that the pavilion no longer served any functional purpose. I disagree. I think the headhouse could have easily been integrated into the new Terminal 6.
 
Noshow
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Re: Legendary architect I.M. Pei has died at 102

Wed May 29, 2019 11:17 am

A true landmark architect. He did the Louvre pyramid as well and the Bank of China building at HKG and plenty of airport control towers for the FAA.
 
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jfklganyc
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Re: Legendary architect I.M. Pei has died at 102

Wed May 29, 2019 11:46 am

Good overview, but some facts mixed up

This was the TWA Domestic Terminal until TWA 800 (1996) After that, TWA shrunk to fit in T5.

The terminal was barely used until B6 started and was home to a hodge podge of airlines: ATA, Pan Am II, Carnival and America West.

In the late 90s, UA was gradually expanding their presence at JFK and took gates 1-3 for LA and SFO only.

Even with UA in place, T6 was greatly under utilized.

B6 did not force UA out...they werent big enough to do that.

Leading up to 9/11 the terminal was used by UA (1-3), HP (4-5 I believe), and B6 on the south side. The middle was empty.

UA slashed JFK by Dec 2001 and T6 was mostly empty.

HP got the nudge to T7 over the next few years as B6 gradually expanded into the north side of T6.

As for opinions, you love the Sundrome and find it acclaimed...however few people agree with you.

It wasnt landmarked, there was some chatter as it was torn down (but nothing reached the level of the worldport)

T6 always had a one giant problem at JFK...it was a domestic only terminal...at an airport with few domestic flights.

By the time B6 took over T6, it was a mess that resembled a concrete bunker. Maroon and biege (thank you 1980s TWA) were the colors of choice.

According to Neeleman “we left the AC and Heat on at all times, because we didnt think they would restart if we shut them off.

B6 put some lipstick on the pig...new lighting, new doors, new concessions, new bathrooms and they painted everything white and blue.

But the terminal was dangerously overcrowded. With no windows in the middle gate section (for some reason a hallmark of 70s JFK) it was dark.

The TSA line snaked across the bridges, down the escalator and into the street on bad mornings.

Frankly, it was an old terminal that wasnt put to the test until B6...and it really buckled under the pressure.

The closest building that resembled its concrete structure that I have been in is the old Whitney Museum in NYC.

Demolishing T6 allowed T5i to be built and will eventually allow a single, unified terminal to stretch to the JFK Expressway over the next 5 years.
 
blacksoviet
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Re: Legendary architect I.M. Pei has died at 102

Wed May 29, 2019 6:47 pm

jfklganyc wrote:
Good overview, but some facts mixed up

This was the TWA Domestic Terminal until TWA 800 (1996) After that, TWA shrunk to fit in T5.

The terminal was barely used until B6 started and was home to a hodge podge of airlines: ATA, Pan Am II, Carnival and America West.

In the late 90s, UA was gradually expanding their presence at JFK and took gates 1-3 for LA and SFO only.

Even with UA in place, T6 was greatly under utilized.

B6 did not force UA out...they werent big enough to do that.

Leading up to 9/11 the terminal was used by UA (1-3), HP (4-5 I believe), and B6 on the south side. The middle was empty.

UA slashed JFK by Dec 2001 and T6 was mostly empty.

HP got the nudge to T7 over the next few years as B6 gradually expanded into the north side of T6.

T6 always had a one giant problem at JFK...it was a domestic only terminal...at an airport with few domestic flights.

By the time B6 took over T6, it was a mess that resembled a concrete bunker. Maroon and biege (thank you 1980s TWA) were the colors of choice.

According to Neeleman “we left the AC and Heat on at all times, because we didnt think they would restart if we shut them off.

B6 put some lipstick on the pig...new lighting, new doors, new concessions, new bathrooms and they painted everything white and blue.

But the terminal was dangerously overcrowded. With no windows in the middle gate section (for some reason a hallmark of 70s JFK) it was dark.

The TSA line snaked across the bridges, down the escalator and into the street on bad mornings

I think the middle section of gates was added in the 1980's by TWA. When did Carnival, ATA, and Pan Am II stop using the terminal? I believe they used the middle gates.
 
slider
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Re: RIP I. M. Pei 1917-2019

Thu May 30, 2019 1:07 pm

Pei was unique and I enjoyed his use of angularity, but in limited doses. I always admired architects who develop a certain style that is unmistakable. Pei certainly had that.

Much like today, a guy like Calatrava's work is instantly recognizable.

Thank you for enriching our world, Mr. Pei.
 
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jfklganyc
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Re: RIP I. M. Pei 1917-2019

Fri May 31, 2019 4:38 pm

Carnival was bought by Pan Am II...then they both collapsed. This was probably around 97-98.

ATA went back to T4E until they left JFK. I believe they went to the old LH area.

Good bit of info on TWA building the middle gates. I didnt know that.

They used T6 heavily for domestic ops in the 80s and 90s

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