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caliboy93
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Halloween outside America

Wed Oct 23, 2019 8:54 pm

What is Halloween like in other countries? Here in America it's an all out festival full of costumes, and literally everyone everywhere dresses up, even at work.
 
ACDC8
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Re: Halloween outside America

Wed Oct 23, 2019 9:17 pm

America isn't a country.

Canada, its the same as the US.
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TheFlyingDisk
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Re: Halloween outside America

Wed Oct 23, 2019 9:39 pm

We don't have Halloween in Malaysia. However some 'woke' urbanites tried to make it happen. Yeah no thanks!
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trpmb6
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Re: Halloween outside America

Wed Oct 23, 2019 10:51 pm

Mostly a christian associated holiday with pagan roots. Rooted to All Saints Day (All Hallows eve) and in most other countries its treated in that regard. America has largely commercialized the holiday (like all others sadly).
 
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cjg225
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Re: Halloween outside America

Wed Oct 23, 2019 11:26 pm

I wonder how long it'll take some snooty person to try to corr.....
ACDC8 wrote:
America isn't a country.

Canada, its the same as the US.

....and that didn't take long.

Anyway, here's a decent resource: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geography_of_Halloween
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johns624
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 2:07 am

caliboy93 wrote:
What is Halloween like in other countries? Here in America it's an all out festival full of costumes, and literally everyone everywhere dresses up, even at work.
No, "literally everyone everywhere" dresses up, especially at work. Some of us have serious jobs. Speaking of which, you started a thread a week ago, asking what everyone here did for a living. Yet, I never saw what you do for a living. How about letting us know? You can't keep asking questions without answering those posed to you. That's rude.
 
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 5:30 am

Some kids will dress up and go trick or treating, and the supermarkets have small areas with various useless tat on display. A few will avail of those offering and decorate their houses or lawns, but only in a few of the larger cities. That's about it.

Where we live there are lots and lots of families with kids, plus a lot of the kids from around the neighbourhood also drop by for trick and treating. Luckily for us curmudgeons, an agreement has been made whereby we can hang a note on our door, politely telling the kids to frack off. Halloween is, for some bizarre reason, more popular where I live than generally speaking.

Bah, humbug, is all I have to say, and the note telling the kids to bugger off and annoy some other poor schmuck will be hanging proudly on our door.
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Kiwirob
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 6:19 am

In NZ kids have been wandering around asking for lollies for as long as I can remember, I used to go out as well, here in Norway it's the same kids go wandering the streets knocking on doors for lollies. When I lived in the UK Halloween was a big party night, lots of people dressing up and getting shitfaced.
 
petertenthije
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 7:29 am

Not really a big thing in the Netherlands. The media and advertising industry keep trying to push Halloween though, with Halloween movies/commercials/TV episodes etc. I suppose it keeps the advertising industry busy until Sinterklaas, the Christmas and new-year festivities start.
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Braybuddy
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 8:04 am

I'm always amused when people ask "Do you have Hallowe'en here in Ireland?". Eh, yeah, we more-or-less invented it :roll:. It's based on the old Celtic festival of Samhain (Sow (rhymes with cow) -An) which marked the turning of the year (between the light and dark halves). It was believed that this division between this world and the otherworld was at its least at this time, allowing souls to pass through. People dressed up in frighening costumes to ward off harm from evil spirits. And, of course, like any festival, there were rituals, games and food involved. In the 1840s Irish emigrants to the US brought the festival with them, and it has since morphed into something completely different.

Up to the last decades of the 20th century children used to go from door-to-door in costume, asking for apples and nuts. At home games were played, such as bobbing for apples in a basin of water, or trying to take a bite out of an apple hung from a string. Colcannon (mashed potatoes mixed with chopped kale) was eaten and a sixpence would be wrapped in paper and hidden inside each serving. There would also be a ring baked into a barmbrack (dark cake with raisins and sultanas), and whoever got the slice with it inside would be granted good luck.

Since the 1970s and the popularity of Hallowe'en films, the festival has become more and more Americanised, so it's not much different now to what you'd find anywhere else, sadly.
 
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 9:15 am

Halloween exists Sweden as well, mainly as an "artificial" holiday created by retail stores and etc to get people to spend more money since
there aren't any other holidays between midsummer (end of June) and christmas/jul (end of December).
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FatCat
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 1:01 pm

Kiwirob wrote:
In NZ kids have been wandering around asking for lollies for as long as I can remember, I used to go out as well, here in Norway it's the same kids go wandering the streets knocking on doors for lollies. When I lived in the UK Halloween was a big party night, lots of people dressing up and getting shitfaced.

I was in the UK last week, seems like a lot of people was dressed up and shitfaced, even if Halloween is still some weeks away... :rotfl:
Little effort for Halloween here. Usually, the 1st of November is the day we remember our deads, and visit them at the cemetery. So it's more about the mourning, than the parties...
Anyway, you may see some child going door to door asking for candies. I usually give them fruits & vegetables, because I am evil. :bomb:
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FatCat
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 1:02 pm

Thunderboltdrgn wrote:
Halloween exists Sweden as well, mainly as an "artificial" holiday created by retail stores and etc to get people to spend more money

yeah that religion is called capitalism and it was invented by the united states :-D
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 1:17 pm

Not a holiday in the old country. The holiday is All Saints Day, when people are visiting the cemeteries and clean up and decorate the graves of deceased family members. They also light some candles. It usually starts some time before the holiday itself, so the cemeteries are illuminated by candles for at least a week.
As far as Halloween is concerned, there are attempts to import it. Just as Valentine's Day was imported.
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 1:34 pm

Halloween in Japan was mostly teenage skanks going out scantily clad (and freezing) looking to find guys dumb enough to buy them drinks for three or four hours.
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trpmb6
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 1:42 pm

Aaron747 wrote:
Halloween in Japan was mostly teenage skanks going out scantily clad (and freezing) looking to find guys dumb enough to buy them drinks for three or four hours.


So basically the same as in the USA is what you're saying.
 
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Aaron747
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 1:47 pm

trpmb6 wrote:
Aaron747 wrote:
Halloween in Japan was mostly teenage skanks going out scantily clad (and freezing) looking to find guys dumb enough to buy them drinks for three or four hours.


So basically the same as in the USA is what you're saying.


I grew up in the Bay Area so that's not my memory of Halloween at all. As a kid, it was going around the neighborhood to trick or treat and see which neighbors put up the best funhouse in their front yard, in junior high it was doing that and TP'ing a disliked teachers' house if we got around to it. In high school, we got a convoy of 5-6 cars together and drove up to SF to enjoy the parade in the Castro, out of both curiosity and amazement at the creative and spirited show that area put on Halloween night. Truly the best street party I have ever seen...or at least it was back then.
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trpmb6
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 2:24 pm

Aaron747 wrote:
trpmb6 wrote:
Aaron747 wrote:
Halloween in Japan was mostly teenage skanks going out scantily clad (and freezing) looking to find guys dumb enough to buy them drinks for three or four hours.


So basically the same as in the USA is what you're saying.


I grew up in the Bay Area so that's not my memory of Halloween at all. As a kid, it was going around the neighborhood to trick or treat and see which neighbors put up the best funhouse in their front yard, in junior high it was doing that and TP'ing a disliked teachers' house if we got around to it. In high school, we got a convoy of 5-6 cars together and drove up to SF to enjoy the parade in the Castro, out of both curiosity and amazement at the creative and spirited show that area put on Halloween night. Truly the best street party I have ever seen...or at least it was back then.


Oh that still exists. But then you have those who grew up like we did with those same memories and have now moved onto adulthood and all the goodness that goes with that.

I will note, we do have a lot more haunted houses now. The big amusement parks like six flags convert their parks into haunted houses now. That's a lot of fun too.
 
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Tugger
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 2:34 pm

I know this is supposed to be a thread about "outside the USA" but in the USA at least, Halloween is the biggest non-holiday celebration by far. A lot of people go all out for it. So yes there is a strong "capitalistic" element because businesses are not stupid to pass up an opportunity but looking beyond the money, the day is a lot of fun for me and my community. Our neighbors get together and have a party and hand out candy and enjoy ourselves. We decorate our homes modestly but some go all out. And it is pretty cool.

And best of all is the kids that do come by and are really just enjoying the fun of getting dressed up and going out. Little one with their parents, older ones with parents in the background. Sure there are quite a few trick-or-treaters that just want the candy and every so often there are ones that are jerkier than others but overall it is a fun time when people go out and share time in a community.

I like it.

Tugg
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bgm
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 4:52 pm

Tugger wrote:
I know this is supposed to be a thread about "outside the USA" but in the USA at least, Halloween is the biggest non-holiday celebration by far. A lot of people go all out for it. So yes there is a strong "capitalistic" element because businesses are not stupid to pass up an opportunity but looking beyond the money, the day is a lot of fun for me and my community. Our neighbors get together and have a party and hand out candy and enjoy ourselves. We decorate our homes modestly but some go all out. And it is pretty cool.

And best of all is the kids that do come by and are really just enjoying the fun of getting dressed up and going out. Little one with their parents, older ones with parents in the background. Sure there are quite a few trick-or-treaters that just want the candy and every so often there are ones that are jerkier than others but overall it is a fun time when people go out and share time in a community.

I like it.

Tugg


Completely agree. Yes it's commercialized, but it's fun, especially for kids. I have fond memories of trick or treating.

petertenthije wrote:
Not really a big thing in the Netherlands. The media and advertising industry keep trying to push Halloween though, with Halloween movies/commercials/TV episodes etc. I suppose it keeps the advertising industry busy until Sinterklaas, the Christmas and new-year festivities start.


Don't forget Zwarte Piet. That is truly scarier than any Halloween costume. :wideeyed:

For those who don't know about this lovely Dutch tradition, see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zwarte_Piet
Last edited by bgm on Thu Oct 24, 2019 4:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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casinterest
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 4:54 pm

Tugger wrote:
I know this is supposed to be a thread about "outside the USA" but in the USA at least, Halloween is the biggest non-holiday celebration by far. A lot of people go all out for it. So yes there is a strong "capitalistic" element because businesses are not stupid to pass up an opportunity but looking beyond the money, the day is a lot of fun for me and my community. Our neighbors get together and have a party and hand out candy and enjoy ourselves. We decorate our homes modestly but some go all out. And it is pretty cool.

And best of all is the kids that do come by and are really just enjoying the fun of getting dressed up and going out. Little one with their parents, older ones with parents in the background. Sure there are quite a few trick-or-treaters that just want the candy and every so often there are ones that are jerkier than others but overall it is a fun time when people go out and share time in a community.

I like it.

Tugg


We have a neighborhood get together, and this year the kids have Friday off from school., so I assume it will get rowdier than usual. Not expecting a lot of folks to work on Nov 1 around my neighborhood
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seb146
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 5:57 pm

It seems Halloween becomes more violent and sadistic every year. More slasher movies, more blood, more gore. Keep it. The brosband thinks it is cute watching all the kids with their bags full of diabetes. I did enjoy the one time I went to Vancouver on Halloween and saw fireworks going off. That was cool.
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 6:27 pm

Thunderboltdrgn wrote:
Halloween exists Sweden as well, mainly as an "artificial" holiday created by retail stores and etc to get people to spend more money since
there aren't any other holidays between midsummer (end of June) and christmas/jul (end of December).

Quite the same here in northern Germany. When I was a kid "Halloween" was completely unknown. We had and still have (in the far north) a similar tradition ("Rummelpott") of kids going from door to door singing a song and asking for sweets, but that was not on 31. October. That day was "reformation day" (remember Martin Luther?) which now since 2 years is a real holiday (a day off) in Northern Germany.


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petertenthije
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 6:31 pm

bgm wrote:
Don't forget Zwarte Piet. That is truly scarier than any Halloween costume. :wideeyed:

Well, I did specifically mention Sinterklaas, Zwarte Piet is part of the Sinterklaas festivities.
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 6:48 pm

bgm wrote:
Don't forget Zwarte Piet. That is truly scarier than any Halloween costume. :wideeyed:

For those who don't know about this lovely Dutch tradition, see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zwarte_Piet

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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 6:48 pm

masi1157 wrote:
Thunderboltdrgn wrote:
Halloween exists Sweden as well, mainly as an "artificial" holiday created by retail stores and etc to get people to spend more money since
there aren't any other holidays between midsummer (end of June) and christmas/jul (end of December).

Quite the same here in northern Germany. When I was a kid "Halloween" was completely unknown. We had and still have (in the far north) a similar tradition ("Rummelpott") of kids going from door to door singing a song and asking for sweets, but that was not on 31. October. That day was "reformation day" (remember Martin Luther?) which now since 2 years is a real holiday (a day off) in Northern Germany.


Gruß, masi1157


The same here. "Allhelgona" (All Saints' Day) have always been the tradition in Sweden. The "Rummelpott" you talk about is similar to
the Swedish Easter tradition where children are dressed up as Easter witches (påskkärring) going from door to door asking for candy
in return from own made hand drawn drawings.
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masi1157
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Re: Halloween outside America

Thu Oct 24, 2019 7:08 pm

Thunderboltdrgn wrote:
The same here. "Allhelgona" (All Saints' Day) have always been the tradition in Sweden.

All Saints Day ("Allerheiligen") on 1. November has forever been a holiday in the southern catholic part of Germany, but not in the north. We finally got our protestant holiday (with the 500th anniversary) the day before.

Thunderboltdrgn wrote:
The "Rummelpott" you talk about is similar to the Swedish Easter tradition where children are dressed up as Easter witches (påskkärring) going from door to door asking for candy in return from own made hand drawn drawings.

I don't really remember the exact day. It was in autumn or early winter and it seems to vary from region to region. But it surely was not around easter. And we were not dressed specially, but we had instruments with us (the "Rummelpott") to make a lot of noise.


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Airstud
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Re: Halloween outside America

Fri Oct 25, 2019 1:15 am

I have recently learned that KitKat bars, despite saying "Hershey" somewhere on the wrapper's fine print, are actually "owned" by Nestlé (however that sort of thing works :boggled: ) which licenses the rights to Hershey in the USA. Therefore I shan't purchase KitKat bars ever again, since a bit of my money would thus still be going to Nestlé; I am part of the worlwide Nestlé boycott.

I was therefore a little bit relieved to find out that even though they've exited the U.S. candy market, they still retain the rights to the CRUNCH bar, and Ferrero will be licensing it as Hershey does KitKat. I am relieved by this because it means I still can't buy CRUNCH bars; and if I could, I would weigh probably 800℔ .
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Re: Halloween outside America

Fri Oct 25, 2019 5:06 am

Kiwirob wrote:
In NZ kids have been wandering around asking for lollies for as long as I can remember, I used to go out as well, here in Norway it's the same kids go wandering the streets knocking on doors for lollies. When I lived in the UK Halloween was a big party night, lots of people dressing up and getting shitfaced.


I was living in Australia in 2011 when Halloween coincided perfectly with the Melbourne Cup and it was an interesting experience as we had a a Halloween party while celebrating the races. While a ton of fun it is kinds weird not doing the holiday in a fall/autumn environment. For adults the season doesn't matter however if you are a kid it would make a difference.
It's spring in the southern hemisphere and sunset in Melbourne where I was living is at 7:55pm on October 31st and it would make trick or treating very late as it it a nighttime thing. At least in Toronto where I live now its 6:15 or so and it gives the kids ample time to trick or treat. When I was a kid it was actually 5:15 and I literally was done trick or treating very early like at 8pm or so.
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Re: Halloween outside America

Fri Oct 25, 2019 6:10 am

seb146 wrote:
It seems Halloween becomes more violent and sadistic every year. More slasher movies, more blood, more gore. Keep it.


Although I'm not a fan of the "slasher" genre as a whole, I will admit that I have enjoyed a slasher movie from time to time and that some are definitely better than others. The thing is that now most of what are referred to as "slasher" movies are nothing more than just gross torture porn with no creativity involved whatsoever.

Give me An American Werewolf In London, John Carpenter's The Thing, or Poltergeist, or even the original Fright Night or The Howling for my Halloween viewing pleasure instead.
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Re: Halloween outside America

Fri Oct 25, 2019 6:36 am

cjg225 wrote:
I wonder how long it'll take some snooty person to try to corr.....

And I wondered how long it'll take an even snootier person to make a pointless comment on a correction. You disappointed me :rotfl:
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Re: Halloween outside America

Fri Oct 25, 2019 6:55 am

TSS wrote:
seb146 wrote:
It seems Halloween becomes more violent and sadistic every year. More slasher movies, more blood, more gore. Keep it.


Although I'm not a fan of the "slasher" genre as a whole, I will admit that I have enjoyed a slasher movie from time to time and that some are definitely better than others. The thing is that now most of what are referred to as "slasher" movies are nothing more than just gross torture porn with no creativity involved whatsoever.

Give me An American Werewolf In London, John Carpenter's The Thing, or Poltergeist, or even the original Fright Night or The Howling for my Halloween viewing pleasure instead.


I've never quite figured out the appeal of watching 16/17 year olds played by 25 year olds having sex and getting butchered over and over again, especially consodering many of these movies were written by the same group of middle aged men. As if we didn't have enough real lunatics in the world doing similar depraved things... :yuck:

I love supernatural thrillers like Poltergeist though. I also like most found footage stuff but I think it's been tapped out in the last 5 years.
Last edited by 1989worstyear on Fri Oct 25, 2019 6:55 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Halloween outside America

Fri Oct 25, 2019 6:55 am

In Australia, Halloween has only really become popularised in the last 20 or so years. I remember as a kid in primary school (c. Mid-Late 90s) asking the teacher what Halloween was, and even after her explanation that it was an American tradition where you dress up. I still didn't quite understand until I became much older.

Nowadays it's become very commercialised. All the supermarkets and other retailers go all out with decorations and associated merch. Children will go out trick or treating. If I'm home that evening I'll generally turn the lights off and pretend I'm not home. I don't really like the idea of handing out lollies to random kids that come to my doorstep, it seems a bit weird to me. But sometimes I do put a skull out on my porch and leave it there for some time afterwards. It does a good job of keeping the Jehovah's witnesses out of my hair

Seriously though if we're going to import other countries traditions why can't we celebrate Día de los muertos instead? That sounds a lot more interesting.
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Airstud
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Re: Halloween outside America

Fri Oct 25, 2019 7:20 am

1989worstyear wrote:

I've never quite figured out the appeal of watching 16/17 year olds played by 25 year olds having sex


I've figured out that part...
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Re: Halloween outside America

Fri Oct 25, 2019 9:25 am

When I was a kid here in Australia, US style Halloween was a thing from TV and movies.

We've had a neighbourhood event for at least 10 years now, but the whole things is nowhere near the scale of October in North America
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Re: Halloween outside America

Fri Oct 25, 2019 3:44 pm

1989worstyear wrote:
TSS wrote:
seb146 wrote:
It seems Halloween becomes more violent and sadistic every year. More slasher movies, more blood, more gore. Keep it.


Although I'm not a fan of the "slasher" genre as a whole, I will admit that I have enjoyed a slasher movie from time to time and that some are definitely better than others. The thing is that now most of what are referred to as "slasher" movies are nothing more than just gross torture porn with no creativity involved whatsoever.

Give me An American Werewolf In London, John Carpenter's The Thing, or Poltergeist, or even the original Fright Night or The Howling for my Halloween viewing pleasure instead.


I've never quite figured out the appeal of watching 16/17 year olds played by 25 year olds having sex and getting butchered over and over again, especially consodering many of these movies were written by the same group of middle aged men. As if we didn't have enough real lunatics in the world doing similar depraved things... :yuck:

I love supernatural thrillers like Poltergeist though. I also like most found footage stuff but I think it's been tapped out in the last 5 years.


We are watching the current version of "Are You Afraid Of The Dark". It is misnamed, since it is not a weekly meeting of The Midnight Society, but I digress. I guess, because I have not seen many horror movies in my life, that show is scary to me. Not one drop of blood shown, either. "Sleeping With The Enemy" is another movie I would consider horror, even though only one person is killed. "Something Wicked This Way Comes" death toll is 1 but I have to watch it during the day it is that scary to me. Showing a person strangled by their own spleen is not scary to me. It makes me physically ill.
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zakuivcustom
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Re: Halloween outside America

Fri Oct 25, 2019 5:26 pm

Aaron747 wrote:
Halloween in Japan was mostly teenage skanks going out scantily clad (and freezing) looking to find guys dumb enough to buy them drinks for three or four hours.


There's the commercialization part also - i.e. theme parks like Universal Studio Japan turning the whole park into a huge haunted house, some malls (or department stores) having decorations. But yes, otherwise it's mainly people in 10s/20s dressing in costumes and get really drunk (I was in Dotonbori area in Osaka once on Halloween night...let's just say it's a bunch of drunks yelling/screaming...well, and lots of people watching from me :)). Oh, and of course, since it's Japan some restaurants would have Halloween-theme food.

(Some quick examples):
https://www.misterdonut.jp/m_menu/new/190906_002/
https://www.kfc.co.jp/menu/detail/?menu_id=832 (KFC Japan)

Similar things occurred in Hong Kong - i.e. theme parks (i.e. Ocean Park HK) turn into giant haunted house with people dressing in costume. Places like Lan Kwai Fong are usually crowded (Don't know about this year, though...), some shops/malls have Halloween-related decoration.
 
TSS
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Joined: Fri Dec 29, 2006 3:52 pm

Re: Halloween outside America

Fri Oct 25, 2019 6:52 pm

seb146 wrote:
1989worstyear wrote:
TSS wrote:
Although I'm not a fan of the "slasher" genre as a whole, I will admit that I have enjoyed a slasher movie from time to time and that some are definitely better than others. The thing is that now most of what are referred to as "slasher" movies are nothing more than just gross torture porn with no creativity involved whatsoever.

Give me An American Werewolf In London, John Carpenter's The Thing, or Poltergeist, or even the original Fright Night or The Howling for my Halloween viewing pleasure instead.


I've never quite figured out the appeal of watching 16/17 year olds played by 25 year olds having sex and getting butchered over and over again, especially consodering many of these movies were written by the same group of middle aged men. As if we didn't have enough real lunatics in the world doing similar depraved things... :yuck:

I love supernatural thrillers like Poltergeist though. I also like most found footage stuff but I think it's been tapped out in the last 5 years.


We are watching the current version of "Are You Afraid Of The Dark". It is misnamed, since it is not a weekly meeting of The Midnight Society, but I digress. I guess, because I have not seen many horror movies in my life, that show is scary to me. Not one drop of blood shown, either.


I didn't know that series had been rebooted, but the original was good and several episodes were genuinely scary. Ditto several other horror anthology series from the 90s such as Tales From The Dark Side and Monsters. Tales From The Crypt (the TV series) was okay, but could be very uneven in quality and chill factor from episode to episode.

seb146 wrote:
"Sleeping With The Enemy" is another movie I would consider horror, even though only one person is killed.


More "thriller" than "horror", but the two genres do cross over from time to time.

seb146 wrote:
"Something Wicked This Way Comes" death toll is 1 but I have to watch it during the day it is that scary to me.


I haven't seen that movie, mainly because I tried to read the book and couldn't get more than a couple of chapters in before losing interest.

seb146 wrote:
Showing a person strangled by their own spleen is not scary to me. It makes me physically ill.


Agreed.
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Re: Halloween outside America

Fri Oct 25, 2019 9:02 pm

StarAC17 wrote:
It's spring in the southern hemisphere and sunset in Melbourne where I was living is at 7:55pm on October 31st and it would make trick or treating very late as it it a nighttime thing. At least in Toronto where I live now its 6:15 or so and it gives the kids ample time to trick or treat. When I was a kid it was actually 5:15 and I literally was done trick or treating very early like at 8pm or so.


I've never had anyone knock on my door for trick or treat after dark in Australia. At least where I live kids are out until sunset, so around 7:30-8:00.
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