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fr8mech
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Emergency Preparedness, Part Deux

Sat Apr 04, 2020 4:22 pm

So, 2 years ago I started a thread about emergency preparedness.

viewtopic.php?f=11&t=1403863&hilit=Emergency+preparedness

Some responders were supportive, some ambivalent, some poo-poo’ed the concept, and some were insulting and condescending.

In light of recent events, what do you think of being a little more ready? Any changes you’d make to your supply? Do you think you’ll start a kit when this event passes?

I look at this event as a wake-up call, a rehearsal (so to speak), a test run. No, I’m not saying it’s been engineered, just that it’s an interesting case. The supply chain hasn’t really been interrupted. Infra-structure is still in place and functioning. Government and its organs are still working, in some cases, working overtime. There has not been any societal breakdown worthy of the words. Yet, we are still in an emergency.

Changes I would make:
-work on that food supply. We have plenty for the short-term, but we’re seriously lacking for a mid-term problem. Long-term has never really been something I’ve been worried about, and I don’t think that’s changed at all. I was surprised that the fresh meats disappeared. I was, and still am ok there. I don’t have an extra freezer, so my supply isn’t excessive (subjective), but not bad.

-toilet paper and sundries? Really? Well, we weren’t caught too short on that. I had made a trip to Sam’s just before the madness started and bought a normal quantity of “paper” products. That resupply tends to last 6 weeks or so. I have since purchased a couple of smaller packs to augment, but nothing ridiculous. When this is over, I’ll lay on an extra 32 pack, because people are irrational, and the next emergency will see an even greater shortage.

-apparently there was a run on ammunition and firearms. I’m not making any changes there, since I’ve got a good supply of both :smile: My wife doesn’t give me the stink eye anymore when I leave the house carrying.

-gasoline. Well, we’re apparently in a supply glut right now, so I’ve taken advantage of that and filled all my gas cans. This happens to be the normal time for that anyway...it being spring and all.

-medical supplies. Well, I certainly didn’t see that coming. Hand sanitizer, masks, gloves, disinfectant, etc. All in short supply. I have a sleeve of N95 masks from when I was doing a bunch of drywall, but I’m neither wearing any, nor plan to be. Gloves? I’ve always kept a large supply of nitrile because I use them for all kinds of things, from cooking, to painting, to picking up after my dogs, to cleaning. Not a germaphobe by any stretch of the word, but I like to keep my hands clean. Which brings me to this PSA:

******for the love of God, understand how to use gloves if you’re going to use them. They are single use. Perform a task, and discard. If you wear them...the same pair...all the time, you aren’t accomplishing a darn thing. In fact, you may be making things worse. Unbroken skin is an effective barrier to most microbes. The only accepted reason (IMHO) for wearing gloves all the time is if they act as a reminder and deterrent to prevent you from touching your face, mouth, eyes, etc. *******

Well, what are you going to change, if anything?
When seconds count, the police are minutes away, or may not come at all.
It’s hard to win an argument with a smart person, but it’s damn near impossible to win an argument with a stupid person. ~B. Murray
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DarkSnowyNight
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Re: Emergency Preparedness, Part Deux

Sat Apr 04, 2020 5:54 pm

fr8mech wrote:

-gasoline. Well, we’re apparently in a supply glut right now, so I’ve taken advantage of that and filled all my gas cans. This happens to be the normal time for that anyway...it being spring and all.


You are a fireman; you probably know this. How long is gasoline good for? Is there an amount of time after which it is no longer useful as a fuel stock? I know sediments and trashes will settle after some months, but are there utility barriers beyond this?


fr8mech wrote:
******for the love of God, understand how to use gloves if you’re going to use them. They are single use. Perform a task, and discard. If you wear them...the same pair...all the time, you aren’t accomplishing a darn thing. In fact, you may be making things worse. Unbroken skin is an effective barrier to most microbes. The only accepted reason (IMHO) for wearing gloves all the time is if they act as a reminder and deterrent to prevent you from touching your face, mouth, eyes, etc. *******


Yep. My company used to hate that I trained FNGs that way. I have more than a few emails castigating 'spendthrift habits' WRT glove use. Considering the carcinogenic chemicals Aviation is fraught with, their attitude problem about that was a reliable source of frustration.

In any case, yes. Single Use means Single Use. It is not like a condom, where you can just turn it inside-out and use it again. . .
"Nous ne sommes pas infectés. Il n'y a pas d'infection ici..."
 
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fr8mech
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Re: Emergency Preparedness, Part Deux

Sat Apr 04, 2020 7:36 pm

DarkSnowyNight wrote:
You are a fireman; you probably know this. How long is gasoline good for? Is there an amount of time after which it is no longer useful as a fuel stock? I know sediments and trashes will settle after some months, but are there utility barriers beyond this?


That’s a good question. The Google machine says 6 months or so. I use a fuel stabilizer in all my gas cans. And, I can tell you, that I have never had a problem with fuel that’s sat in a can for a year or more. Now, I do know that gasoline will form a shellac like coating if it’s allowed to sit in a carburetor or the like for extended periods. I always run my machines dry when I’m putting them away for the season.
When seconds count, the police are minutes away, or may not come at all.
It’s hard to win an argument with a smart person, but it’s damn near impossible to win an argument with a stupid person. ~B. Murray
Ego Bibere Capulus, Ut Aliis Sit Vivere
 
vikkyvik
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Re: Emergency Preparedness, Part Deux

Sat Apr 04, 2020 8:50 pm

DarkSnowyNight wrote:
In any case, yes. Single Use means Single Use. It is not like a condom, where you can just turn it inside-out and use it again. . .


:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

That was hilarious.
I'm watching Jeopardy. The category is worst Madonna songs. "This one from 1987 is terrible".
 
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DarkSnowyNight
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Re: Emergency Preparedness, Part Deux

Tue Apr 07, 2020 4:41 pm

fr8mech wrote:
DarkSnowyNight wrote:
You are a fireman; you probably know this. How long is gasoline good for? Is there an amount of time after which it is no longer useful as a fuel stock? I know sediments and trashes will settle after some months, but are there utility barriers beyond this?


That’s a good question. The Google machine says 6 months or so. I use a fuel stabilizer in all my gas cans. And, I can tell you, that I have never had a problem with fuel that’s sat in a can for a year or more. Now, I do know that gasoline will form a shellac like coating if it’s allowed to sit in a carburetor or the like for extended periods. I always run my machines dry when I’m putting them away for the season.



Thanks. Yeah, it is the Shellac thing that I have not seemed to be able to find a good answer on. My sister has an automobile she has not started since November. It has been garaged, so elements really are not an issue, but from what I understand, there was about an eighth of a tank left. I think I will just bring her a gallon or two and see what happens this weekend.

vikkyvik wrote:
DarkSnowyNight wrote:
In any case, yes. Single Use means Single Use. It is not like a condom, where you can just turn it inside-out and use it again. . .


:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

That was hilarious.


Heh, thanks. A lot of my job involves teaching Fams, etc these days -well for the next few weeks anyway. You find ways to keep student attention after a while. . .
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fr8mech
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Re: Emergency Preparedness, Part Deux

Tue Apr 07, 2020 8:51 pm

DarkSnowyNight wrote:
Thanks. Yeah, it is the Shellac thing that I have not seemed to be able to find a good answer on. My sister has an automobile she has not started since November. It has been garaged, so elements really are not an issue, but from what I understand, there was about an eighth of a tank left. I think I will just bring her a gallon or two and see what happens this weekend.


Since November? I wouldn’t worry about the gas. Throw some fresh gas in there, maybe a fuel injector cleaner and have a go. Drive it a bit.

I’d be more concerned with the battery. Be prepared to jumpstart the car, or if the battery is beyond its warranty period, replace it. Once they go dead, especially during the winter, they’re on borrowed time.
When seconds count, the police are minutes away, or may not come at all.
It’s hard to win an argument with a smart person, but it’s damn near impossible to win an argument with a stupid person. ~B. Murray
Ego Bibere Capulus, Ut Aliis Sit Vivere
 
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DarkSnowyNight
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Re: Emergency Preparedness, Part Deux

Wed Apr 08, 2020 9:27 am

fr8mech wrote:
DarkSnowyNight wrote:
Thanks. Yeah, it is the Shellac thing that I have not seemed to be able to find a good answer on. My sister has an automobile she has not started since November. It has been garaged, so elements really are not an issue, but from what I understand, there was about an eighth of a tank left. I think I will just bring her a gallon or two and see what happens this weekend.


Since November? I wouldn’t worry about the gas. Throw some fresh gas in there, maybe a fuel injector cleaner and have a go. Drive it a bit.

I’d be more concerned with the battery. Be prepared to jumpstart the car, or if the battery is beyond its warranty period, replace it. Once they go dead, especially during the winter, they’re on borrowed time.



Yes. The battery in question was already geriatric to begin with -the one that came with the vehicle when new in late 2015- so I am certain a jump will be in order, followed shortly by replacement so as not to tax the alternator with a weak battery. I will likely do this all sometime next week. I was considering the FI cleaner as well, and as inexpensive as that is, yes, I think that will also be part of the deal.
"Nous ne sommes pas infectés. Il n'y a pas d'infection ici..."

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