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ArchGuy1
Topic Author
Posts: 1418
Joined: Wed Jul 10, 2019 11:35 pm

The 1918 Spanish Flu

Wed Apr 29, 2020 2:45 am

With the coronavirus currently taking place, I am wondering how life went during the 1918 Spanish Flu. How was learning in schools done for example, because doing so electronically was not an option back then obviously and many schools were closed for a while. Also, how was testing and social distancing done during the Spanish Flu and were businesses shut down. I understand it killed 50 million people, mainly young people in large part due to World War One. It is a fascinating event in history to learn about and here is a thread from 2008 to read about.
viewtopic.php?f=11&t=1195069&p=17365847&hilit=Spanish+flu#p17365847
Last edited by ArchGuy1 on Wed Apr 29, 2020 2:59 am, edited 1 time in total.
 
GalaxyFlyer
Posts: 5659
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 4:44 am

Re: The 1918 Spanish Flu

Wed Apr 29, 2020 2:57 am

There wasn’t any testing, some cities (USA) practiced different quarantines. People just got on with life and suffered the deaths of many relatives. My grandfather lost several of his friends from what grandmother said. Medicine then wasn’t very effective. Remember, 5 years later the President of the US lost his son to what was basically a stubbed toe causing blood poisoning. A short ER visit today and some anti-biotics
 
GDB
Posts: 13681
Joined: Wed May 23, 2001 6:25 pm

Re: The 1918 Spanish Flu

Wed Apr 29, 2020 8:01 am

Well it's 'Spanish' since being a non combatant there was no censorship there, it was the first to report it, while there is no exact source for it, the consensus is the Midwest, which would be of little import if, uniquely, large numbers of men were going not from Europe to the US but for the first time ever, in the other direction.
Right into a Europe ravaged by war, into hospitals.
It was an early form of mass transport, just slower and on a ship. (OK, cruise lines played a part this time too, albeit a minor one).
In an age when disease was poorly understood, no modern drugs, no one knew about genetics.
But in 1918/19 the 2nd wave was much worse, the ignorant people and their leader protesting lockdowns won't know this, would not want to know this. It was in the fall.
 
ltbewr
Posts: 15125
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2004 1:24 pm

Re: The 1918 Spanish Flu

Wed Apr 29, 2020 12:48 pm

There is the saying that 'History doesn't repeat itself, but does rhyme'. The history of the Spanish Flu pandemic of 100 years ago does rhyme with the Covid-19 pandemic. The history of 100 years ago is being used to deal with the Covid-19 pandemic. The history of how it was dealt with like social distancing, along with potential vaccines and treatments, the use of technology not available then will hopefully limit the numbers infected, severity and deaths from it. Of course like 100 years ago the loss of jobs, homes, economic disruptions, the reality of human behavior and politics are limiting the ability to deal with it in ideal ways. Everyone must do their part to limit the severity of this virus or we will face many millions dead.
 
ArchGuy1
Topic Author
Posts: 1418
Joined: Wed Jul 10, 2019 11:35 pm

Re: The 1918 Spanish Flu

Mon May 04, 2020 5:24 pm

ltbewr wrote:
There is the saying that 'History doesn't repeat itself, but does rhyme'. The history of the Spanish Flu pandemic of 100 years ago does rhyme with the Covid-19 pandemic. The history of 100 years ago is being used to deal with the Covid-19 pandemic. The history of how it was dealt with like social distancing, along with potential vaccines and treatments, the use of technology not available then will hopefully limit the numbers infected, severity and deaths from it. Of course like 100 years ago the loss of jobs, homes, economic disruptions, the reality of human behavior and politics are limiting the ability to deal with it in ideal ways. Everyone must do their part to limit the severity of this virus or we will face many millions dead.

How was learning done with schools shut down by the Spanish Flu and the lack of the technology seen today.
 
GalaxyFlyer
Posts: 5659
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 4:44 am

Re: The 1918 Spanish Flu

Mon May 04, 2020 10:45 pm

ltbewr wrote:
There is the saying that 'History doesn't repeat itself, but does rhyme'. The history of the Spanish Flu pandemic of 100 years ago does rhyme with the Covid-19 pandemic. The history of 100 years ago is being used to deal with the Covid-19 pandemic. The history of how it was dealt with like social distancing, along with potential vaccines and treatments, the use of technology not available then will hopefully limit the numbers infected, severity and deaths from it. Of course like 100 years ago the loss of jobs, homes, economic disruptions, the reality of human behavior and politics are limiting the ability to deal with it in ideal ways. Everyone must do their part to limit the severity of this virus or we will face many millions dead.


Without a vaccine or acquired herd immunity, they’ll die anyway, under your theory. I’m listening to the Swedes, Nobel laureate Michael Levitt and thinking it won’t take millions to die before reaching saturation. In any case, 50 million died out of perhaps 2 billion and life went on to the Roaring 20s. No one gets out alive.

No, I don’t want to contract COVID, I’ll take all the reasonable precautions that many refused from the beginning, and see how it works out. Washing hands and face thoroughly, wearing a mask (no thanks to the “experts) and avoiding crowds is easy to do. Don’t live in NYC is easy to do.
 
winginit
Posts: 2849
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 9:23 pm

Re: The 1918 Spanish Flu

Mon May 04, 2020 10:50 pm

ArchGuy1 wrote:
With the coronavirus currently taking place, I am wondering how life went during the 1918 Spanish Flu. How was learning in schools done for example, because doing so electronically was not an option back then obviously and many schools were closed for a while. Also, how was testing and social distancing done during the Spanish Flu and were businesses shut down. I understand it killed 50 million people, mainly young people in large part due to World War One. It is a fascinating event in history to learn about and here is a thread from 2008 to read about.
viewtopic.php?f=11&t=1195069&p=17365847&hilit=Spanish+flu#p17365847


This is a great listen, and answers many of the questions you likely have.

GalaxyFlyer wrote:
I’m listening to the Swedes, Nobel laureate Michael Levitt and thinking it won’t take millions to die before reaching saturation.


It's not fully clear to me as to why some keep referencing Sweden as a more palatable alternative to the US strategy. Not only does the Swedish curve look awful, but their economy is set to take a hit that's on par with the rest of Europe.
 
GalaxyFlyer
Posts: 5659
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2016 4:44 am

Re: The 1918 Spanish Flu

Mon May 04, 2020 11:04 pm

The curve isn’t vastly different than the rest of the EU. Fewer per capita deaths than most of the large EU nations. They have an export driven economy, so effected by others.
 
winginit
Posts: 2849
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 9:23 pm

Re: The 1918 Spanish Flu

Mon May 04, 2020 11:32 pm

GalaxyFlyer wrote:
The curve isn’t vastly different than the rest of the EU. Fewer per capita deaths than most of the large EU nations. They have an export driven economy, so effected by others.


I mean... I think I might consider it vastly different given it is one of the very few EU nation curves that's going up... whereas almost all of the others are going, you know, down. I'm pretty sure we call those things opposites.
 
Kiwirob
Posts: 12857
Joined: Mon Jun 13, 2005 2:16 pm

Re: The 1918 Spanish Flu

Tue May 05, 2020 5:25 am

GalaxyFlyer wrote:
ltbewr wrote:
There is the saying that 'History doesn't repeat itself, but does rhyme'. The history of the Spanish Flu pandemic of 100 years ago does rhyme with the Covid-19 pandemic. The history of 100 years ago is being used to deal with the Covid-19 pandemic. The history of how it was dealt with like social distancing, along with potential vaccines and treatments, the use of technology not available then will hopefully limit the numbers infected, severity and deaths from it. Of course like 100 years ago the loss of jobs, homes, economic disruptions, the reality of human behavior and politics are limiting the ability to deal with it in ideal ways. Everyone must do their part to limit the severity of this virus or we will face many millions dead.


Without a vaccine or acquired herd immunity, they’ll die anyway, under your theory. I’m listening to the Swedes, Nobel laureate Michael Levitt and thinking it won’t take millions to die before reaching saturation. In any case, 50 million died out of perhaps 2 billion and life went on to the Roaring 20s. No one gets out alive.



You've hit on what is the really really big problem, in 1918 there were 1.5 billion humans, in 1973 when I was born there were 3.9 billion humans, today there are 7.8 billion humans, whilst our population is exploding the amount of wilderness area is shrinking, in 1918 nearly 80% of the world was wilderness, when I was born is was down to 60%, today its just 23%.
 
speedbird52
Posts: 1013
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2016 5:30 am

Re: The 1918 Spanish Flu

Tue May 19, 2020 10:43 am

winginit wrote:
GalaxyFlyer wrote:
The curve isn’t vastly different than the rest of the EU. Fewer per capita deaths than most of the large EU nations. They have an export driven economy, so effected by others.


I mean... I think I might consider it vastly different given it is one of the very few EU nation curves that's going up... whereas almost all of the others are going, you know, down. I'm pretty sure we call those things opposites.

I can guarantee you that the second wave will affect Sweden far less than those countries with the curves going down
 
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Aaron747
Posts: 11987
Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2003 2:07 am

Re: The 1918 Spanish Flu

Tue May 19, 2020 10:59 am

Kiwirob wrote:
GalaxyFlyer wrote:
ltbewr wrote:
There is the saying that 'History doesn't repeat itself, but does rhyme'. The history of the Spanish Flu pandemic of 100 years ago does rhyme with the Covid-19 pandemic. The history of 100 years ago is being used to deal with the Covid-19 pandemic. The history of how it was dealt with like social distancing, along with potential vaccines and treatments, the use of technology not available then will hopefully limit the numbers infected, severity and deaths from it. Of course like 100 years ago the loss of jobs, homes, economic disruptions, the reality of human behavior and politics are limiting the ability to deal with it in ideal ways. Everyone must do their part to limit the severity of this virus or we will face many millions dead.


Without a vaccine or acquired herd immunity, they’ll die anyway, under your theory. I’m listening to the Swedes, Nobel laureate Michael Levitt and thinking it won’t take millions to die before reaching saturation. In any case, 50 million died out of perhaps 2 billion and life went on to the Roaring 20s. No one gets out alive.



You've hit on what is the really really big problem, in 1918 there were 1.5 billion humans, in 1973 when I was born there were 3.9 billion humans, today there are 7.8 billion humans, whilst our population is exploding the amount of wilderness area is shrinking, in 1918 nearly 80% of the world was wilderness, when I was born is was down to 60%, today its just 23%.


Agreed - this is a huge opportunity for all countries to rethink the necessity of endless and rampant breeding. Having more than two children, in both developed and economically-challenged societies, is irresponsible.
If you need someone to blame / throw a rock in the air / you'll hit someone guilty
 
winginit
Posts: 2849
Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2013 9:23 pm

Re: The 1918 Spanish Flu

Tue May 19, 2020 3:28 pm

speedbird52 wrote:
winginit wrote:
GalaxyFlyer wrote:
The curve isn’t vastly different than the rest of the EU. Fewer per capita deaths than most of the large EU nations. They have an export driven economy, so effected by others.


I mean... I think I might consider it vastly different given it is one of the very few EU nation curves that's going up... whereas almost all of the others are going, you know, down. I'm pretty sure we call those things opposites.

I can guarantee you that the second wave will affect Sweden far less than those countries with the curves going down


You cannot even 'guarantee' me that there will be a second wave. It is certainly possible, even likely, but you cannot guarantee it. Nice try though.
 
frmrCapCadet
Posts: 4111
Joined: Thu May 29, 2008 8:24 pm

Re: The 1918 Spanish Flu

Tue May 19, 2020 4:09 pm

If the virus is out there, and there is no vaccine (nor herd immunity, not even close yet), and people are interacting there will be a second wave. As sure as gravity.
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