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Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 1:52 am
by fr8mech
I will preface this by saying that I love email, texts, IM, etc. at work because it keeps me from actually talking to people that I really don't like talking to.

I'm also the type of guy that likes brevity in business communications and I don't like fluff.

My Inbox is empty except for emails that require follow-up, and I read and act on emails just as soon as they come in. Incidentally, this is why I refuse the option to install my employer's email on my personal device.

The obvious thing that bugs me, and just about everyone else I know, is the "Reply to All" function. I'll just leave it there.

Of course, grammar and spelling. My God people, there are actual tools installed in the more popular email apps that help us send out a grammatically coherent email.

The last thing that bugs me is one that probably doesn't bug very many people, but my clean Inbox fetish compels me to add it. I don't need a "Thank you" or "Copy" or "OK" or any other such single line acknowledgment that you have received my communication. By all means, if you need clarification, ask, but don't feel the need to thank me.

Just something light to chew on.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 2:06 am
by DLFREEBIRD
well, when I send emails and don't get a response. I am annoyed.
however I'm a property manager and I am writing to inform an owner, what needs to be taken care of. I expect a response.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 2:22 am
by fr8mech
DLFREEBIRD wrote:
well, when I send emails and don't get a response. I am annoyed.
however I'm a property manager and I am writing to inform an owner, what needs to be taken care of. I expect a response.


Of course you should get a response if you expect one. Yes, I would be annoyed by that also, but do kick out a "Thank you" after you get your response?

I think the thing is, that folks think that proper personal etiquette translates verbatim to written etiquette. I don't think it does.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 3:38 am
by DLFREEBIRD
yes, I get that with texts, someone saysTY, and by habit, I reply YW

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 3:41 am
by einsteinboricua
Oh the dreaded "Reply All". Whose fault is it when it's misused?

I hate when an email is sent with every person on the planet listed in the To/CC lines and then someone hits Reply All for something addressed JUST to the sender.

The Oatmeal has an excellent comic.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 5:17 am
by stl07
Call me silly but I like a thank you email because I then know that the recipient bothered to open my email

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 6:21 am
by flipdewaf
fr8mech wrote:
I will preface this by saying that I love email, texts, IM, etc. at work because it keeps me from actually talking to people that I really don't like talking to.

I'm also the type of guy that likes brevity in business communications and I don't like fluff.


It’s funny, I hate email,text IM etc because to me they are slow and full of ‘fluff’. I get when it’s transactional you can write “Do XYZ by 12:45 tomorrow” but nuances can easily be lost in these forms of communication and we end up with 12hrs of email tennis when 5 mins of telephone will do. My job involves a lot of turning nuance in to objectives, you miss the nuance in written comma.

fr8mech wrote:
My Inbox is empty except for emails that require follow-up, and I read and act on emails just as soon as they come in. Incidentally, this is why I refuse the option to install my employer's email on my personal device.

I try to keep my inbox empty too, if an email needs an action I turn it into a task and get driven by the task list. I check emails every 2-3hrs, if something takes 2mins or less to deal with I do it straight away, if it’s longer I schedule it. I have all notifications turned off I like to say ‘I drive my emails, my emails don’t drive me’. I have only work phone, use it as personal phone too, I do check work email out of office hrs and if I’m on holiday I leave an out of office saying ‘if it’s interesting I’ll reply, if it’s boring I’ll deal with it on my return.

fr8mech wrote:

The obvious thing that bugs me, and just about everyone else I know, is the "Reply to All" function. I'll just leave it there.

It’s hilarious on the company wide emails, especially when ‘Karen’ from purchasing relies to all with “you do know you replied to all”
fr8mech wrote:


Of course, grammar and spelling. My God people, there are actual tools installed in the more popular email apps that help us send out a grammatically coherent email.

The last thing that bugs me is one that probably doesn't bug very many people, but my clean Inbox fetish compels me to add it. I don't need a "Thank you" or "Copy" or "OK" or any other such single line acknowledgment that you have received my communication. By all means, if you need clarification, ask, but don't feel the need to thank me.
For me it depends on the email but I generally don’t. I have one exception and that’s for one of our internal lawyers, really nice guy, I was having a beer with him discussing emails and he said because of the nature of his job he isn’t allowed to delete emails no matter how trivial so I tease him by sending him awkward emails he’s not allowed to delete.
fr8mech wrote:
Just something light to chew on.


It’s a good thread, I like it.

I’d like to add one of my bug bears, the long ‘word smithed’ email written from a silo.

It’s all horses for courses, due to covid I have been working from home for 4 months and the thing I miss most is collaborating on the worst sketch/diagram ever to understand a problem. “But there’s a whiteboard function on MS teams” nah, not even remotely the same as a real pen in my dry wipe room.

Fred


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 9:31 am
by cpd
einsteinboricua wrote:
Oh the dreaded "Reply All". Whose fault is it when it's misused?

I hate when an email is sent with every person on the planet listed in the To/CC lines and then someone hits Reply All for something addressed JUST to the sender.

The Oatmeal has an excellent comic.


Along with the 20-30 “please don’t reply all admonishment emails” - sent, you guessed it, to the entire organisation...

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 9:54 am
by fr8mech
Here's an example:

From Engineering sent to our entire department's management, plus his department (~20 people)...Please generate a work order to troubleshoot high oil consumption on XXXXX engine.
From a co-worker, replying to all, and adding the appropriate tech...Please comply with engineering's request.
From tech, replying to all...Work order completed.
From co-working, replying to all...Looks Good! Thanks for your help!

How I handle it:

Receive the email. Forward it to the Tech I assign. Get the work order number from the Tech. Then I reply to all with the number number, so that everyone knows the work order has been generated.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 12:46 pm
by cpd
fr8mech wrote:
Here's an example:

From Engineering sent to our entire department's management, plus his department (~20 people)...Please generate a work order to troubleshoot high oil consumption on XXXXX engine.
From a co-worker, replying to all, and adding the appropriate tech...Please comply with engineering's request.
From tech, replying to all...Work order completed.
From co-working, replying to all...Looks Good! Thanks for your help!

How I handle it:

Receive the email. Forward it to the Tech I assign. Get the work order number from the Tech. Then I reply to all with the number number, so that everyone knows the work order has been generated.


In my place the reply all goes to probably 40,000 people!

Then someone tries to recall the email. :)

I’m surprised organisations don’t have blocks on who can send to the big all staff distribution lists.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 1:21 pm
by Revelation
flipdewaf wrote:
fr8mech wrote:
I will preface this by saying that I love email, texts, IM, etc. at work because it keeps me from actually talking to people that I really don't like talking to.

I'm also the type of guy that likes brevity in business communications and I don't like fluff.


It’s funny, I hate email,text IM etc because to me they are slow and full of ‘fluff’. I get when it’s transactional you can write “Do XYZ by 12:45 tomorrow” but nuances can easily be lost in these forms of communication and we end up with 12hrs of email tennis when 5 mins of telephone will do. My job involves a lot of turning nuance in to objectives, you miss the nuance in written comma.

You are lucky you can reliably get people to answer the phone, and if they do answer, they aren't pissy because you interrupted whatever they were doing.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 1:36 pm
by casinterest
Revelation wrote:
flipdewaf wrote:
fr8mech wrote:
I will preface this by saying that I love email, texts, IM, etc. at work because it keeps me from actually talking to people that I really don't like talking to.

I'm also the type of guy that likes brevity in business communications and I don't like fluff.


It’s funny, I hate email,text IM etc because to me they are slow and full of ‘fluff’. I get when it’s transactional you can write “Do XYZ by 12:45 tomorrow” but nuances can easily be lost in these forms of communication and we end up with 12hrs of email tennis when 5 mins of telephone will do. My job involves a lot of turning nuance in to objectives, you miss the nuance in written comma.

You are lucky you can reliably get people to answer the phone, and if they do answer, they aren't pissy because you interrupted whatever they were doing.




Phone calls:
These are usually fluff in the engineering world. I want a history i can look back at, and email and instant messages are usually the go to for that chain.

Calls are necessary though when you need to make sure an idea is communicated clearly though. Now our company has software that transcribes calls on meetings, so it is easier to get the history, but "other" stuff also gets recorded so it cuts down on some of the BS.

Emails:
Reply's of "Got it", "thanks", and "etc...."all seem a bit redundant, but they go to my "history" statement above. There is a known chain of acceptance of responsibility In this Covid environment we need a bit more of this as we can't just walk to the next cube or office and press someone for what is needed.

Filter:
Filters are a must for me. I am copied on tickets and alerts from customers. if I didn't use them I would have 500 emails a day in my inbox. What really kills me is when a device is on the fritz, and no one deals with the "flapping" alarm


Reply to All.:
In my line of business, it is used so that managers and other engineers are aware of what is going on in case of the "Hit by a bus" issue. I try to keep my audiences small and in the know. Unfortunately once the sales guys get a hold of it, the list expands and so does the clutter

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 1:42 pm
by einsteinboricua
fr8mech wrote:
Here's an example:

From Engineering sent to our entire department's management, plus his department (~20 people)...Please generate a work order to troubleshoot high oil consumption on XXXXX engine.
From a co-worker, replying to all, and adding the appropriate tech...Please comply with engineering's request.
From tech, replying to all...Work order completed.
From co-working, replying to all...Looks Good! Thanks for your help!

How I handle it:

Receive the email. Forward it to the Tech I assign. Get the work order number from the Tech. Then I reply to all with the number number, so that everyone knows the work order has been generated.

Well...that example is fuzzy. I believe in letting all interested parties know what's going on. If those people don't have to be included, I just narrow down the list.

A better example is:

From retiring employee (sent to everyone he's ever known in the To/Cc lines): *message about how great it's been to work with them*
One employee, replying to all: Happy Retirement
Retiring employee, replying to all: Thank you
Annoyed employee, replying to all: Who are you? Take me off your list.
Another employee, replying to all from annoyed employee email: Enjoy your retirement
Annoyed employee, replying to all: TAKE ME OFF YOUR LIST!
[...]
You get the picture. This has happened MANY times in my career, though people are slowly starting to understand what Bcc is for.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 2:02 pm
by zrs70
fr8mech wrote:

Just something light to chew on.


If we are going to comment on grammar checking, can we mention that a sentence shouldn’t end with a preposition?

:)

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 2:40 pm
by vikkyvik
zrs70 wrote:
fr8mech wrote:Just something light to chew on.If we are going to comment on grammar checking, can we mention that a sentence shouldn’t end with a preposition?


More importantly, it's not even a complete sentence. :biggrin:

fr8mech wrote:
The obvious thing that bugs me, and just about everyone else I know, is the "Reply to All" function. I'll just leave it there.


I often CC more people than just the recipient, and when replying, I'll often Reply All. In fact, I get really annoyed when I've specifically included other people on an email, and then someone else replies back just to me. There's a valid point to this - if I include other people it is so that those people know what is going on. It may either affect them directly or indirectly, it may simply keep them in the loop on something they may get asked about, it may give them some knowledge they didn't previously have, or it may give them history on something they may need to look into in the future.

Now there are people who copy half the company for no good reason. There is one offender in particular, and everyone is familiar with his email pattern. As it happens, his name is Vy (pronounced Vee), so his email are known as.....Vymails.

fr8mech wrote:
Of course, grammar and spelling. My God people, there are actual tools installed in the more popular email apps that help us send out a grammatically coherent email.


Really bad spelling and grammar bother me, but minor mistakes don't bother me. Each person has a different level of education and understanding of language. Many people with whom I work speak English as a 2nd language. So unless the meaning is unclear, it's no big deal.

fr8mech wrote:
I don't need a "Thank you" or "Copy" or "OK" or any other such single line acknowledgment that you have received my communication. By all means, if you need clarification, ask, but don't feel the need to thank me.


Feel free to delete my thank you email immediately if you want. But if someone provides me with a useful or timely reply, I will generally send a thank you. It's no different than talking to someone in person.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 3:28 pm
by ltbewr
As to E-mail etiquette, while E-mails are an important tool of communications far too often they are subject to abuse and misuse.
One trick I use as to personal e-mails is to use one account (of 4 I have) for 'junk' and many subscribed ad e-mails to be sent to. I will use 'unsubscribe' but sometimes that is useless. I don't mind a once a week e-mail with good coupons but not every day..
The Pandemic has made e-mail critical in my day to day work as the primary form of communications. What does bug me is when my supervisor ignores e-mails where raise important questions I want a prompt response to as likely gets a lot of e-mails overall.
E-mails with bad spelling, are messy 'word salads', bug me.
Too often e-mails are butt covers with too many recipients.
One can set up an e-mail to require acknowledgement of receipt of it, especially with critical information.
Don't use work e-mails for porn, sexist, racist, complaints of bosses as a sure way to get fired.
Also don't send e-mails with phony 'we care' comments, like with many companies expressing support of anti-racism protests last month. Please, your e-mail is a joke, instead of sending out millions of e-mails, why not just make structural changes needed to help reduce racism in your workplaces and relations with customers.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 3:38 pm
by NWAESC
This is a short read. I wish more people would adopt this style of email communication.

https://hbr.org/2016/11/how-to-write-em ... -precision

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 7:15 pm
by fr8mech
zrs70 wrote:
fr8mech wrote:

Just something light to chew on.


If we are going to comment on grammar checking, can we mention that a sentence shouldn’t end with a preposition?

:)


https://www.grammarly.com/blog/youve-be ... eposition/

As for whether it’s a complete sentence or not, it may be a little sloppy and lazy, but I think it meets the criteria for a sentence.

einsteinboricua wrote:
From retiring employee (sent to everyone he's ever known in the To/Cc lines): *message about how great it's been to work with them*


Ha, we just had one of those. There were about 60 people in the original email. About a third replied to all. I replied to his home email, which he provided.

vikkyvik wrote:
In fact, I get really annoyed when I've specifically included other people on an email, and then someone else replies back just to me. There's a valid point to this


Please don’t misunderstand me. There are plenty of valid reasons to use ‘reply to all’. I use it all the time, when there is a business need that it be used. I also pay attention to what folks have done to the email addresses during an email exchange with several folks. I look for additions and subtractions. It gives one a good idea of what's going on in someone’s head. Is he going into CYA mode? Is he looping more folks in because he needs help? Why did he drop our bosses from the email?

I always bring my boss into an email exchange that may bridge shifts, especially from a particular manager. Yet he continually drops my boss off his responses. I find that curious.

vikkyvik wrote:
Really bad spelling and grammar bother me, but minor mistakes don't bother me. Each person has a different level of education and understanding of language. Many people with whom I work speak English as a 2nd language. So unless the meaning is unclear, it's no big deal.


Spelling bugs me...a lot. Because there are robust tools to help with that. Grammar is something that I’m less concerned with. I handle a lot of email traffic from Europeans and Asians. I understand that syntax will screw with grammar.

There’s one German who sends over a request “all together, please release for entry”. I know what he means, even though it makes very little sense. It’s just the way language is put together.

vikkyvik wrote:
Feel free to delete my thank you email immediately if you want. But if someone provides me with a useful or timely reply, I will generally send a thank you. It's no different than talking to someone in person.


The issue I have with superfluous emails, is that any email I get during my shift tends to be time sensitive. An aircraft may not depart on time if I don’t get my end of the paperwork done. So, any email that comes in draws my attention from the work that I’m doing, or the conversation that I may be having. That little “unread” envelope in the lower right corner demands my immediate attention.

NWAESC wrote:
This is a short read. I wish more people would adopt this style of email communication.


Oh, I like the BLUF.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 8:02 pm
by NWAESC
I try and employ "BLUF" as much as I can... It's definitely a work in progress for me.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 8:34 pm
by flipdewaf
Revelation wrote:
flipdewaf wrote:
fr8mech wrote:
I will preface this by saying that I love email, texts, IM, etc. at work because it keeps me from actually talking to people that I really don't like talking to.

I'm also the type of guy that likes brevity in business communications and I don't like fluff.


It’s funny, I hate email,text IM etc because to me they are slow and full of ‘fluff’. I get when it’s transactional you can write “Do XYZ by 12:45 tomorrow” but nuances can easily be lost in these forms of communication and we end up with 12hrs of email tennis when 5 mins of telephone will do. My job involves a lot of turning nuance in to objectives, you miss the nuance in written comma.

You are lucky you can reliably get people to answer the phone, and if they do answer, they aren't pissy because you interrupted whatever they were doing.


Its not that I can always get people to answer and they are happy to do so. After 2 emails and any wooliness still remaining I will call and if no answer I will arrange a call/meeting. Whilst technically I'm an engineer the reality is that I'm a project manager and generally dealing with non engineers (i describe my job as when I'm in a room full of engineers I'm a scientist and when I'm in a room full of scientists I'm an engineer) my picking up the phone is normally around teasing out of people what it is they are actually asking, you'd be surprised how often people don't know what they are asking for. In the end people generally aren't pissy with you after they realise that by asking the right questions things can quickly be short circuited.

casinterest wrote:

Phone calls:
These are usually fluff in the engineering world. I want a history i can look back at, and email and instant messages are usually the go to for that chain.

Calls are necessary though when you need to make sure an idea is communicated clearly though. Now our company has software that transcribes calls on meetings, so it is easier to get the history, but "other" stuff also gets recorded so it cuts down on some of the BS.


Interestingly our company has a written policy of 'not' keeping history for instant messages. I get the fluff piece within engineering though, between departments/disciplines there can be a lot that gets lost in translation. Each group has its own language and acronyms, each university defines things in its own ways.

Fred

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 9:07 pm
by Revelation
einsteinboricua wrote:
fr8mech wrote:
Here's an example:

From Engineering sent to our entire department's management, plus his department (~20 people)...Please generate a work order to troubleshoot high oil consumption on XXXXX engine.
From a co-worker, replying to all, and adding the appropriate tech...Please comply with engineering's request.
From tech, replying to all...Work order completed.
From co-working, replying to all...Looks Good! Thanks for your help!

How I handle it:

Receive the email. Forward it to the Tech I assign. Get the work order number from the Tech. Then I reply to all with the number number, so that everyone knows the work order has been generated.

Well...that example is fuzzy. I believe in letting all interested parties know what's going on. If those people don't have to be included, I just narrow down the list.

A better example is:

From retiring employee (sent to everyone he's ever known in the To/Cc lines): *message about how great it's been to work with them*
One employee, replying to all: Happy Retirement
Retiring employee, replying to all: Thank you
Annoyed employee, replying to all: Who are you? Take me off your list.
Another employee, replying to all from annoyed employee email: Enjoy your retirement
Annoyed employee, replying to all: TAKE ME OFF YOUR LIST!
[...]
You get the picture. This has happened MANY times in my career, though people are slowly starting to understand what Bcc is for.

Yeah but the retired person doesn't care, s/he is probably happy that's the last email sh!tstorm of their career! :biggrin:

I do agree people are finally learning what BCC and Reply-To are for, and have learned to just delete email that is clearly not intended for them instead of launching a WTF reply.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 9:14 pm
by Revelation
NWAESC wrote:
I try and employ "BLUF" as much as I can... It's definitely a work in progress for me.

Long before I heard of BLUF I would often start important emails with "Executive Summary". I think it's a bit cheeky because it suggests executives don't read their email, but then again that's probably true.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 15, 2020 9:50 pm
by theaviator380
I do not like people starting email with only name,

e.g. James, (followed by contents)

What does it takes to start as Hi James or Hello James or Morning James?

I also do not like people writing an email like a train bogies....with no punctuation, all in small letters just a train of words ! yes there are people like that out there.

Also, I always acknowledge or respond even if it is a simple thank you etc.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Thu Jul 16, 2020 4:59 pm
by readytotaxi
When replying to an email should you quote it or just say I got it?

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Fri Jul 17, 2020 5:41 pm
by seb146
I am getting into graphic design at work. People will send a picture or a menu or business card with zero instruction and zero context. Just an attachment. If it is an obvious business need, we reply and ask what they want. We hear nothing from them. Then, they get upset when we don't have 1000 business cards printed and waiting for them or that we don't have 50 menus laminated for them.

And, yes, we do get the "OMG!!! SO FUNNY!!!" email chains from people who sent us one thing to be printed years ago. One woman at least once a week will send pictures and quotes from scripture justifying her hatred of "the Devil's lettuce" and hatred of her "soon to be ex-husband". She sends this email to not only us but also insurance companies and media outlets.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Fri Jul 17, 2020 6:42 pm
by aeromoe
zrs70 wrote:
fr8mech wrote:

Just something light to chew on.


If we are going to comment on grammar checking, can we mention that a sentence shouldn’t end with a preposition?

:)


Nor questions: Where is so-and-so at? !!

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Tue Jul 21, 2020 10:16 pm
by AstroNav
'I read and act on emails just as soon as they come in'


Work to your own schedule. That's what you are paid for.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 22, 2020 12:28 am
by fr8mech
AstroNav wrote:
'I read and act on emails just as soon as they come in'


Work to your own schedule. That's what you are paid for.


I am paid to act on the emails as soon as they come in. That's why superfluous emails annoy me.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 22, 2020 1:32 pm
by AstroNav
Encourage your mailers to use the telephone or stop by your desk instead.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 22, 2020 1:44 pm
by slider
AstroNav wrote:
Encourage your mailers to use the telephone or stop by your desk instead.


Often, I'll need it in writing for documentation purposes. Many people have jobs in which we *have* to avoid verbal comms.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 22, 2020 1:51 pm
by einsteinboricua
AstroNav wrote:
Encourage your mailers to use the telephone or stop by your desk instead.

You're either not in the workforce (whether because you're young or retired) or are not in a job that requires a lot of communication.

Written communication is the BEST way to document something. That's why even after a phone call, I'll ask people to send me an email with any action items I have.

Phone calls have a place when a tone needs to be set and a physical meeting cannot happen. A physical meeting (going to someone's desk or setting up a meeting in person) works similarly. IMs can replace a phone call for a quick question. But unless you can record your call and meeting, and save your chats, email is the fastest way to produce documentation on a topic. You can take notes in a meeting, but unless someone else confirms them (or it's agreed that your notes will serve as minutes), they don't serve as documentation.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Wed Jul 22, 2020 6:26 pm
by fr8mech
AstroNav wrote:
Encourage your mailers to use the telephone or stop by your desk instead.


Kinda hard when some of those mailers are on the Pac-Rim, cross-town, or even across the street. In the end, everyone in the original email needs to know the end result, they (we all) don’t need to know “see the sausage being made”.

While a paper trail isn’t always necessary, it’s good to have.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Thu Jul 23, 2020 10:46 am
by AstroNav
Plenty of people hide behind emails and some will use it against you without taking responsibility for their short-comings.

Electronic mail is a tool and it is often abused.

Pick the telephone up!

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Thu Jul 23, 2020 11:10 am
by fr8mech
AstroNav wrote:
Plenty of people hide behind emails and some will use it against you without taking responsibility for their short-comings.

Electronic mail is a tool and it is often abused.

Pick the telephone up!


Once again, I will note, that a large amount of my email comes from the Pac Rim. I applaud them for doing their darnedest to speak English, because my Chinese, Korean & Japanese are non-existent, though my Australian is spot on. It is much easier and efficient to communicate with them via email. It is much easier for us to understand each other.

The telephone leaves no record, unless recorded, and when dealing with foreign languages, opens you up to miscommunication.

Hell, I had a phone conversation (domestic) last night that I followed up with an email, so that I could confirm we were all on the same page.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Sat Jul 25, 2020 5:50 am
by AstroNav
The ubiquity of e-mail does not absolve one of the requirement for proper documentation.

Workflow and collaboration tools are designed for that.

What happens when you leave and the juicy info is buried deep within an email from 5 years back?

Etiquette isn't solely about whether you say hello, hi or how you choose to sign-off.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Sat Jul 25, 2020 1:47 pm
by Revelation
AstroNav wrote:
The ubiquity of e-mail does not absolve one of the requirement for proper documentation.

Workflow and collaboration tools are designed for that.

What happens when you leave and the juicy info is buried deep within an email from 5 years back?

Etiquette isn't solely about whether you say hello, hi or how you choose to sign-off.

Problem is, bosses aren't going to dig in to those workflow tools to find answers, they want their damn emails answered.

They just scan email, they don't chase answers.

I've emailed links to bosses that directly answer their question and later it was clear they didn't bother to open the link.

Now I copy/paste big blobs of stuff and the link, having learned the hard way.

Re: Email Etiquette

Posted: Sat Jul 25, 2020 10:23 pm
by fr8mech
AstroNav wrote:
The ubiquity of e-mail does not absolve one of the requirement for proper documentation.


I work for a Part 121 carrier. I know all about proper documentation, and it has nothing to do with email.

AstroNav wrote:
What happens when you leave and the juicy info is buried deep within an email from 5 years back?


We have a ridiculously robust email archive system. I can find an email I sent or received 10 years ago (when the system came online) with a couple of keywords. Anyone who was in the address line has access to that same email, and our IT Security folks can recover any email sent or received since the system was put in place.

In fact, our system rules will archive any email that has been in an active folder (inbox, sent, deleted, etc) if it’s been sitting there a year. We are told not to hold onto emails, and never, ever save them to hard drive.

I wonder...if I were to search “Thank you”, how many hits I would get?