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baec777
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Boeing 707s

Wed Dec 12, 2001 3:05 pm

Can anyones give me details on Boeing 707s, when did it entered service, and when Boeing stopped its productions...?



baec777
 
baec777
Topic Author
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RE: Boeing 707s

Wed Dec 12, 2001 3:06 pm

Sorry, forgot asking what planes were compared to this Boeing 707.....

baec777
 
fly707
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RE: Boeing 707s

Thu Dec 13, 2001 12:11 am

Boeing 707 entered service in late 1950s .
You can look at aircraft data and history in airliners net that would give you any information about any aircraft in the world .
Thanks to airliners net for this great srevice .  Smile
Without mistakes we will never learn
 
CPDC10-30
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RE: Boeing 707s

Thu Dec 13, 2001 12:24 am

The last was produced in 1990 or 1991, can't remember exactly.
 
Tan Flyr
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RE: Boeing 707s

Thu Dec 13, 2001 12:32 am

A little bit of info....The first 707s were ordered by PAn-Am on Oct.13, 1955, entering revenue service in 1958 or 1959.Most other airlines place orders for theirs not long after that..Check Boeings website for all kinds of info.

Ithink the last commercial 707's came off the Renton line in 1972 or 73 (or so) The AWACs versions and a few military/government transport examples were produced up into the early 1980's. I don't think any past 84 or so. Again, check Boeings website.
 
lmml 14/32
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RE: Boeing 707s

Thu Dec 13, 2001 12:38 am

Roll out: 14 May 1954 (N70700)
Maiden flight: 15 July 1954
First commercial order: 13 October 1955
Launch Customer: PanAM
Certification for Commercial Ops: 18 Sept 1958
First Commercial flight: 26 Oct 1958 (PanAM N711PA)
Final production unit delivered to Nigeria Airways: 30 Jan 1978
Last B707 airframe: B707-700 delivered to the Moroccan Air Force as Tanker on 10 March 1982.

Hope this summary helps.
 
CPDC10-30
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RE: Boeing 707s

Thu Dec 13, 2001 12:47 am

Hmmm...this is from Boeing's site:

When the 707 production line was closed at the end of May 1991, Boeing had sold 1,010 of all types (not counting the KC-135 series).

Thats why I was under the assumption it was 1991...
 
ILuvYak40
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RE: Boeing 707s

Thu Dec 13, 2001 12:55 am

CPDC10-30 -

They might've closed the production line a few years after their last order (1984-ish), maybe expecting more...
 
lmml 14/32
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RE: Boeing 707s

Thu Dec 13, 2001 1:48 am

My source: Boeing Airliners by Airliner World
 
lewis
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RE: Boeing 707s

Thu Dec 13, 2001 2:05 am

I think that the line was closed in 1991, when the last 707, a military one with those modern, huge, 777-looklike engines was manufactured.
 
lmml 14/32
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RE: Boeing 707s

Thu Dec 13, 2001 2:27 am

Last 707 commercial build was the Nigerian tanker. This unit was intended as a 707-700, fitted with CFM56 turbofans. The last ever 707 airframe was delivered to the RAF on August 31, 1991 as rightly stated by Lewis above.
 
lmml 14/32
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RE: Boeing 707s

Thu Dec 13, 2001 2:28 am

Sorry, the MOROCCAN (not Nigerian) tanker.
 
yow
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RE: Boeing 707s

Thu Dec 13, 2001 4:54 am

I have that book as well and 1991 is indeed the year in which the last 707 airframe was produced. 1978 was when the last 707 for a commerical airline was produced.
 
baec777
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RE: Boeing 707s

Thu Dec 13, 2001 6:33 am

What airlines operated the Boeing 707s at start...?

I dont see much flying, but possibly Royal Jordanian is still flying their B707s as freighters...


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Royal Jordanian Boeing 707s
Royal Jordanian Boeing 720s

baec777
 
baec777
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RE: Boeing 707s

Thu Dec 13, 2001 10:34 am

What differences in between B707s & B720s....??

baec777
 
411A
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RE: Boeing 707s

Thu Dec 13, 2001 12:49 pm

Quite a lot really, shorter, different flaps, less fuel, lower weights, etc.
Optimised for short-medimum flights.

One model of the 707 was actually shorter than a 720, 707-138 developed for Qantas. Lots of fuel, very long range, nice machine. John Travolta has one. Stage III hushkits I believe.
 
ILS
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RE: Boeing 707s

Thu Dec 13, 2001 12:59 pm

The Boeing 707 originated from design studies into an improved version of the military Model 367, then in production for the United States Air Force (USAF) as the C-97. Many configurations of aircraft were considered until finally the 80th configuration was chosen and the aircraft was then dubbed the Model 367-80. With no government funds available, $16 million of the companies funds were used to construct a prototype and the project was officially launched on May 20, 1952. At the time of the project go-ahead, Boeing had changed the way in which it allocated model numbers. As a result the new aircraft would be designated in the 700 block as the 707. The prototype Model 367-80/707 (registered N70700) was rolled out at Renton on May 14, 1951. The aircraft made its first flight from Renton on July 15, 1954 and in August 1955 the aircraft received great publicity by doing two complete barrel rolls over Lake Washington with test pilot A M Tex Johnston at the controls. Initially airlines found the cabin of the 707 to be too small. Boeing subsequently increased the width and length of the cabin. The first order for the aircraft was received from Pan American World Airways (Pan Am), with the airline ordering 23 707-121's. The order was later changed for 15 of these aircraft to become 707-321's. The first 707-121 for Pan Am was rolled out on October 28, 1957 and made its first flight on December 20, 1957. Pan Am's fifth 707 aircraft (N711PA) inaugurated the first revenue-earning 707 flight on October 26, 1958. A unique variant of the 707 was produced for Qantas - the 707-138. This aircraft featured a 3m (10ft) fuselage reduction to allow the carriage of additional fuel. Altogether 138 commercial 707-100's were delivered before production ceased. The Boeing 707-200 was another one off variant produced for Braniff International Airways. The aircraft featured larger thrust engines to improve hot-and-high take-off performance. Braniff had an initial order for five aircraft but one was lost a pre-delivery acceptance flight and thus only four entered service.

Boeing 707-300/-400


The next variant of the 707 to appear was the 707-300 Intercontinental. The aircraft was designed for transoceanic routes. The 707-300 featured a lengthened fuselage which enabled the aircraft to carry around 189 passengers. The wing span and wing area was also increased along with the horizontal tail span. Pan Am was also the launch customer for this version of the 707 and the first delivery to the airline took place on July 19, 1959. The improved 707-300B featured changes including an extension to the wingspan and curved wingtips. Pan Am was once again the launch customer and ordered 31 707-321B's on February 13, 1961 with the first entering service on June 1, 1962. The 707-300C was also launched by Boeing, which was a convertible cargo/passenger aircraft. It featured a large cargo door on the port side of the forward fuselage. Pan Am was launch customer and ordered 15 707-321C's on April 25,1962. The 707-300 was the most popular variant of the 707 aircraft family. A total of 545 commercial model 707-300's were built, the final example being delivered to Nigeria Airways on January 30, 1978. The 707-400 was similar to the 707-300 but featured Rolls-Royce Conway 50B turbofans. Launch customer for this variant was BOAC with the first delivery taking place on February 12, 1960. A total of 37 707-400's were built with other customers being Air India, Cunard Eagle, El Al, Lufthansa and Varig.

Boeing 720-020


The Boeing 720 was a derivative of the 707 designed for operating short to medium range routes from shorter runways. The aircraft was originally referred to as the 707-020 and then the 717-020 before the designation 720-020 was finally agreed on. The aircraft was 2.7m (9ft) shorter than the 707-100. Other changes included a redesigned wing with new full-span leading edge Kruger flaps. Maximum capacity was for 165 passengers in an all-tourist class layout. United Airlines was the launch customer for the 720 and ordered 29 of the aircraft. The fist example was put into service on July 5, 1960. A total of 154 720's were built with the final example being delivered to Western Airlines on September 20, 1967.
 
BlatantEcho
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ILS

Thu Dec 13, 2001 3:01 pm

Do you know all this off the top of your head? That is a lot of info about each model of the 707, just curious if you especially like the 707 and that is why you were able to produce so much info for that post.

just thinking aloud
BlatantEcho
 
brains
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Baec777 These Are Some 707 Competitors

Thu Dec 13, 2001 6:02 pm

Nobody answered the 2nd question...which a/c compare to the 707.
Well, I guess I'll give it a shot. The 707 was originally meant to be a competitor to the DeHavilland Comet, but it ended up being ten times the a/c the comet could possibly be. After that the 707's main competitor was the Douglas DC-8. Other less successful competitors were the Convair 880, and 990, which were actually faster but didn't have the same kind of success that the DC-8 and especially the 707 had.
Brains
 
CV990
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RE: Boeing 707s

Thu Dec 13, 2001 6:19 pm


Hi!

Many things can be said about the 707, and we all can pass many hours discussing this matter. About the 707 I want to give my contribuition, and this because if Boeing didn't built the KC-135 probably we wouldn't have Boeing today!!! About 707 versions there where 7 original ones:

100 Series - Short body with turbojets
138 Series - EXCLUSIF version for QANTAS, a few inches shorter than the original 100 version
100B Series - 100 version with Turbofans
138B Series - Same one but with Turbofans
200 Series - Same short body as 100 series but with 300 series turbojets, more powerfull
300 Series - Intercontinental version with longer body and more powerfull turbojets
300B - Same one as 300 series but with Turbofans
300C - Same one as 300B series but with Side Cargo door
400 Series - Same one as 300 series but with RRoyce Conway engines

That's my contribution.
Regards
CV990, the Maserati of the skies!
 
lmml 14/32
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RE: Boeing 707s

Thu Dec 13, 2001 7:33 pm

I started my career as an FA on this B720b with AirMalta - AP-AMG - leased from PIA, later purchased and re-registered 9H-AAM. This plane had the inscription: Fastest London-Karachi on the lower fwd fuselage.

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Sadly this is how it met its fate........

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........burned by vandals at the Malta International Airport.

AirMalta also operated several B707's. These were leased for short summer terms each year for a number of years

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Guest

RE: Boeing 707s

Fri Dec 14, 2001 12:25 am

Have over 5000 hrs as FE on 707's. My absolute favorite. Solid as a tank, and a blast to operate.
 
fanofjets
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RE: Boeing 707s

Fri Dec 14, 2001 11:24 am

That last 707 airframe was an AWACS plane, built in 1991 and delivered (I believe) to the Royal Air Force. I have fond memories of flying on the 707; in the 1960s, it was positively futuristic.

A footnote: When Douglas unveiled its DC-8 design, it had six-abreast seating versus the five-abreast proposed by Boeing. The 717 Stratotanker retains that narrow fuselage, but all commercial 707s from the first -121 delivered to Pan American on featured the wider fuselage to match that of the Douglas bird.
The aeroplane has unveiled for us the true face of the earth. -Antoine de Saint-Exupery
 
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RayChuang
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RE: Boeing 707s

Fri Dec 14, 2001 12:35 pm

I think the reason why the Boeing 707 succeeded where the de Havilland Comet failed was not only because of the Comet's early model structural problems, but the fact the 707 had much more growth potential than the Comet. After all, the 189-seat max capacity of the 707-300B series was way above that of the Comet 4 versions.

Anyway, that explains why BOAC had to buy the 707-400 model; the combination of the Comet 4's shortcomings and the delays in the Vickers VC10 project was the main reason for this.

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