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planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Thu Oct 26, 2017 10:14 am

In potentially huge news for Niuean aviation, Real Tonga Airlines (which I posted about above, regarding new flights between Samoa and Tonga), is considering a new service between Niue and Tonga too.

The airline is "hosting a delegation" from Niue, in light of the proposed service.

As Niue's only air service is a 1 - 2x weekly service by Air New Zealand to Auckland, this development is to be welcomed.

See: https://realtonga.to/real-tonga-announc ... -services/.

Image

Cheers,

C.
Last edited by planemanofnz on Thu Oct 26, 2017 10:22 am, edited 1 time in total.
 
planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Thu Oct 26, 2017 10:21 am

Qantas16 wrote:
I think greater cooperation between the Pacific Island airlines (e.g. IE, PX, FJ, SB, NF, TN) will serve as more of a benefit to each nation than a hinderance.

I completely agree - it is a phenomenon which has been developing greatly of late, with not only FJ and IE announcing code-sharing, but NF and SB, FJ and RT, NF and PX, and IE and IK too (all within the past year).

See:
- http://www.radionz.co.nz/international/ ... codeshare/.
- https://realtonga.to/real-tonga-fiji-ai ... agreement/.
- http://www.pireport.org/articles/2017/0 ... -agreement.
- http://www.airlinepros.com/solomon-airl ... i-service/.

Cheers,

C.
 
planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Thu Oct 26, 2017 11:23 am

Cook Islands Tourism Booming

Earlier this month, Cook islands Tourism presented its visitor arrival report for 2016 / 2017.

Visitor arrivals increased by 15%, with New Zealand being the biggest market (at ~105,000 visitors, up ~17%).

Notably, ~35,000 visitors went to Aitutaki.

See: https://corporate.southpacificislands.t ... tatistics/.

It would be wonderful if AIT upgraded its runway, so as to allow an AKL - AIT service on NZ to be established - the demand is clearly there.

Cheers,

C.
 
DavidByrne
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Thu Oct 26, 2017 11:56 am

planemanofnz wrote:
It would be wonderful if AIT upgraded its runway, so as to allow an AKL - AIT service on NZ to be established - the demand is clearly there

Isn’t it more a question of terminal facilities than runway length? At 5900+ ft that might allow A320 ops to AKL, though perhaps weight-restricted. But the terminal . . . ‘nuff said. That’s a big cost for a country with a population 15% less than that of Masterton, and I can’t see the NZ govt rushing to finance a second international terminal, much though we might like them to. But somehow they have had some international ops to and from PPT on an occasional basis - how did they deal with immigration etc? Notwithstanding, I think it’s a very long shot - though I’d love to be proven wrong.
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Thu Oct 26, 2017 5:21 pm

planemanofnz wrote:
nicode wrote:
Air Calin do not have turbo-prop planes.

Indeed, you are correct - it is clearly a mistake in the article.

Cheers,

C.

Indeed; it is semi-correct in that Air Vanuatu flies the route with the ATR 42, but Aircalin uses the A320.

Planemanofnz, thanks so much for helping out contributing to this thread - I've recently started a new job and my time to contribute to the forums has dropped somewhat drastically as a result! Hopefully as this thread gains traction, there will be a few of us regulars who will ensure each bit of news gets captured and posted!

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Mortyman
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Thu Oct 26, 2017 11:56 pm

DavidByrne wrote:
planemanofnz wrote:
It would be wonderful if AIT upgraded its runway, so as to allow an AKL - AIT service on NZ to be established - the demand is clearly there

Isn’t it more a question of terminal facilities than runway length? At 5900+ ft that might allow A320 ops to AKL, though perhaps weight-restricted. But the terminal . . . ‘nuff said. That’s a big cost for a country with a population 15% less than that of Masterton, and I can’t see the NZ govt rushing to finance a second international terminal, much though we might like them to. But somehow they have had some international ops to and from PPT on an occasional basis - how did they deal with immigration etc? Notwithstanding, I think it’s a very long shot - though I’d love to be proven wrong.


I was just at AIT earlier this year and the runway can only take an aircraft as large as an Boeing 737-300 ( noted on an information / history of the airport plaque outside terminal ). The terminal is also an issue. Aitutaki is a very small place with very limited facilities. I'm not sure how much visitors the island can accept and if even the locals will accept a large increase in visitors.
 
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Fri Oct 27, 2017 1:09 am

Mortyman wrote:
I was just at AIT earlier this year and the runway can only take an aircraft as large as an Boeing 737-300 ( noted on an information / history of the airport plaque outside terminal ). The terminal is also an issue. Aitutaki is a very small place with very limited facilities. I'm not sure how much visitors the island can accept and if even the locals will accept a large increase in visitors.


I hope it stays pretty much as it is.

There are a few places in the world that I think should be protected from the tourist hordes and for me Aitutaki is one of them. The paradox is that it may be even more desirable because it is "old fashioned" to get to.

Mass tourism has this unfortunate habit of destroying the very thing it came to find.

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planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Sat Oct 28, 2017 1:35 am

In case anyone is interested, here are the load factors for the Australia - Pacific Islands corridor (for the year ended December 2016):

- AirCalin (73.2% inbound, 75.3% outbound)
- Air New Zealand (RAR) (72.7% inbound, 82.7% outbound)
- Air Niugini (53.9% inbound, 53.1% outbound)
- Air Vanuatu (66.5% inbound, 67.1% outbound)
- Fiji Airways (79.1% inbound, 79.6% outbound)
- Jetstar (NAN) (71.6% inbound, 68.0% outbound)
- Nauru Airlines (47.1% inbound, 46.9% outbound)
- Qantas (NOU) (80.0% inbound, 79.3% outbound)
- Qantas (POM) (54.6% inbound, 50.4% outbound)
- Solomon Airlines (57.3% inbound, 56.5% outbound)
- Virgin Australia (HIR) (39.8% inbound, 43.6% outbound)
- Virgin Australia (NAN) (80.5% inbound, 80.4% outbound)
- Virgin Australia (POM) (45.6% inbound, 50.6% outbound)
- Virgin Australia (TBU) (73.4% inbound, 66.9% outbound)
- Virgin Australia (VLI) (80.7% inbound, 83.5% outbound)
- Virgin Samoa (71.8% inbound, 74.0% outbound)

See: https://bitre.gov.au/publications/ongoi ... CY2016.pdf.

HIR, INU and POM are the weakest performers by the loads measure - though, yield (particularly out of POM) might improve the economics of these flights.

It will be interesting to see QF's POM figures for 2017, given that this will be the first full year of jet services (from BNE) replacing turboprop ones (from CNS).

Cheers,

C.
 
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Sat Oct 28, 2017 2:32 pm

Be nice to see some more action on the Coral route linking South Pacific islands to Hawaii / USA. There was a time when NZ flew many of these routes but I'm dammed if I can find the details at the moment. Nowadays PPT-LAX is well served and it sounds as if we may have another airline serving Tahiti via US (French Blue) in the near future. But as for Samoa, American Samoa, Tonga New Caledonia and Rarotonga it's been slim pickings. Opportunity for Hawaiian with A321? Thoughts?
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:18 pm

NZ321 wrote:
Be nice to see some more action on the Coral route linking South Pacific islands to Hawaii / USA. There was a time when NZ flew many of these routes but I'm dammed if I can find the details at the moment. Nowadays PPT-LAX is well served and it sounds as if we may have another airline serving Tahiti via US (French Blue) in the near future. But as for Samoa, American Samoa, Tonga New Caledonia and Rarotonga it's been slim pickings. Opportunity for Hawaiian with A321? Thoughts?


The Coral Route -

Image

Fiji- Samoa-Aitutaki-Tahiti.

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planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Sun Oct 29, 2017 2:20 pm

Vanuatu seeks closer ties to Bangkok, visa-free access for its citizens

"The Republic of Vanuatu sent a government delegation to Bangkok on September 25-29 to conduct a series of briefings covering trade, tourism and citizenship-by-investment in the South Pacific island nation.

From Bangkok, Vanuatu’s capital of Port Vila is easily reachable via Brisbane, Sydney or Auckland, but plans are being made to operate direct flights from Bangkok to Vanuatu in order to develop trade and tourism links in the Asia Pacific area."


See: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/Economy/30328855.

NZ321 wrote:
Be nice to see some more action on the Coral route linking South Pacific islands to Hawaii / USA.

To be fair, HNL already sees a fair bit of service to the South Pacific Islands, on FJ (APW and NAN) and HA (PPG and PPT). If I am correct, the two destinations in the region which NZ previously linked to HNL, and which do not have any HNL connection now, are RAR and TBU. Notably, HNL - RAR was also once served by AQ (Aloha Airlines), with 737-700s.

Aside from RAR, I do not see any other destinations in the region being of interest to HA.

Regarding the mainland of North America, there are a number of routes in the works. For example, FJ was reported to be considering NAN - YVR, as recently as 2015 (see: http://fijisun.com.fj/2015/08/26/analys ... i-airways/). IMHO, one other route with potential is NOU - LAX, on SB's new A330-neos. IW (AOM) used to fly NOU - LAX - ORY back in 2000/2001, with A340s.

DavidByrne wrote:
That’s a big cost for a country with a population 15% less than that of Masterton, and I can’t see the NZ govt rushing to finance a second international terminal, much though we might like them to. But somehow they have had some international ops to and from PPT on an occasional basis - how did they deal with immigration etc? Notwithstanding, I think it’s a very long shot - though I’d love to be proven wrong.

Last year, the President of the local Chamber of Commerce called for regular international flights to be brought to Aitutaki (see: http://www.radionz.co.nz/international/ ... for-growth):

"DW: How big is that drive for international flights into Aitutaki?

SL: The airport is big enough for it, but it just needs some upgrade measures done and of course a lot of that revolves around safety and things like that. But the domestic flight's about a 45-50 minute flight from Rarotonga. But of course if you're looking at coming here from somewhere else, the airfare up there is pretty expensive - it's almost the same as the international airfare or at least a significant portion of it. So it's an expensive extra trip, but if it was developed with its own international access then it would become a destination in its own right."


Aitutaki is an "international airport" (see the sign in the photo below). Customs and immigration at AIT are, therefore, not unprecedented.

Image

Indeed, as recently as July and August of this year, VT was flying there from French Polynesia (http://www.routesonline.com/news/38/air ... e-in-3q17/).

Finally, tourism and trade - indeed, any tourism and trade - are absolutely vital to the region's economic sustainability. In line with this, aviation investment does need to be strategically considered, even when equivalent investments might not otherwise be progressed elsewhere.

As the article above notes, only an upgrade at AIT is required - not a new facility.

mariner wrote:
I hope it stays pretty much as it is.

Mass tourism has this unfortunate habit of destroying the very thing it came to find.

There are multiple factors at play here, including:

- Development: There is little point for the people living in Aitutaki to have a beautiful beach, while suffering from extremely low living standards. Almost half of the population of the Cook Islands lives in hardship. These people need jobs, which tourism brings (as it has done to many other islands in the region) - denying the residents of Aitutaki of those jobs, for the sake of preserving a 'paradise' that you might visit once every few years (if that), could be viewed as selfish.

- Sustainability: Rather than restrict Aitutaki to developing more backpacker and three-star visitor accommodation, putting pressure on basic infrastructure such as power and water supply, and waste management, Aitutaki should position itself to cater for tourists with real spending power, so that more cash is spent on the island, with less people being needed to do so. Nevertheless, even this strategy requires some further development and investment at AIT.

Applying these factors to an NZ service to AIT:

- A low-frequency AKL - AIT service is not necessarily going to increase the number of visitors to AIT, therefore destroying it - it might merely re-allocate existing codeshare traffic from GZ.

- Many high-yielding visitors value comfort and convenience. A non-stop jet service will better attract this market than a one-stop turboprop one (and indeed differentiate AIT from BOB).

In any event, it will be interesting to see how aviation at AIT develops in the future.

Cheers,

C.
 
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Sun Oct 29, 2017 6:31 pm

planemanofnz wrote:
- Development: There is little point for the people living in Aitutaki to have a beautiful beach, while suffering from extremely low living standards. Almost half of the population of the Cook Islands lives in hardship. These people need jobs, which tourism brings (as it has done to many other islands in the region) - denying the residents of Aitutaki of those jobs, for the sake of preserving a 'paradise' that you might visit once every few years (if that), could be viewed as selfish.


You make some curious assumptions about me. I shall never go to Aitutaki or Rarotonga again, so how is this "selfish"? I am expressing a preferred view which does not deny the islanders tourism nor the income that comes from that.

I saw what happened to Bali with the arrival of the jumbo jet. It turned from being one of the pleasantest islands on earth to an over-developed mass-tourist mess, all in the space of about thirty years. This brought with it all the ills of the west, such as rampant (organised) crime/drugs and prostitution.

I saw what had happened to Acapulco - the wealthy fled when the one-Coca-Cola-two straws crowd arrived. - and Acapulco has become the preferred vacation place of South American criminal families.

I would prefer not to see the same happen to Aitutaki, but it is only personal preference.

planemanofnz wrote:
Sustainability: Rather than restrict Aitutaki to developing more backpacker and three-star visitor accommodation, putting pressure on basic infrastructure such as power and water supply, and waste management, Aitutaki should position itself to cater for tourists with real spending power, so that more cash is spent on the island, with less people being needed to do so. Nevertheless, even this strategy requires some further development and investment at AIT.


I'm in no way advocating more backpacker and three star accommodation, why would you assume that? I think they should go high end.

The most successful jet-set resort island in the world (and with the highest GDP) is St. Bart's - St. Barthélemy - in the Caribbean. They deliberately keep the runway short so that big aircraft can't come in - Dash 7's do most of the work. They have a limit on development, there are no high rise hotels on St. Barts, but there are excellent luxury hotels - the largest has 58 rooms.

planemanofnz wrote:
- A low-frequency AKL - AIT service is not necessarily going to increase the number of visitors to AIT, therefore destroying it - it might merely re-allocate existing codeshare traffic from GZ.


That's what they said about Acapulco and Mallorca and the Greek Islands and the Turkish coast, although the latter two survived better because there was more of them/it. If that's the world you want, hey fine, go for it. Why do you care what I think? This is only an internet message board.

planemanofnz wrote:
- Many high-yielding visitors value comfort and convenience. A non-stop jet service will better attract this market than a one-stop turboprop one (and indeed differentiate AIT from BOB).
[/quote]

I think that basic premise is wrong. As at St. Barts the rich don't care if a desired place is difficult to get to - it increases their sense of personal security, a matter of considerable consequence these days.

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planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 1:19 am

mariner wrote:
You make some curious assumptions about me.

Oh, no assumptions about you personally, at all - merely an analysis of both sides of the debate, hence the references to both the argument of no development at all, and the argument of mass development with backpacker accommodation.

IMHO (and you are very much entitled to your opinion), a low-frequency jet service to AIT would be a middle-ground between the two.

mariner wrote:
I saw what happened to Bali with the arrival of the jumbo jet.

mariner wrote:
I would prefer not to see the same happen to Aitutaki

With all due respect, it is a bit of a stretch to link the proposed development of AIT with DPS' experience and the arrival of jumbo jets - we are talking about a limited jet service here, as has been successfully developed to the likes of IUE and SON in the region.

mariner wrote:
As at St. Barts the rich don't care if a desired place is difficult to get to

And wealthy Americans and Chinese would still find it 'difficult' to get to AIT, with a low-frequency jet service via AKL. However, such a service might enable AIT to better distinguish itself against incumbents, such as BOB, particularly without BOB's infrastructure.

Cheers,

C.
 
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 2:38 am

planemanofnz wrote:
IMHO (and you are very much entitled to your opinion), a low-frequency jet service to AIT would be a middle-ground between the two.


It's not a middle ground that interests me. I stated my preference and nothing you have said changes that preference. As I asked before, why do you care about my opinion?

Nor do I see how you can police this "low-frequency" service. You can certainly disagree, and I have little doubt you will, but IMHO once they spend money on lengthening the runway and improving the terminal, they'll want to pay for it, or at least cover the debt and increased costs of staff, and the easiest way to do that is with more flights.

Who's going to say no?

Not to mention the luxury hotel(s) they'll need to build for the wealthy. Once you enter into the high end market you have to stay competitive and the thin end of the wedge gets a little thicker.

planemanofnz wrote:
With all due respect, it is a bit of a stretch to link the proposed development of AIT with DPS' experience and the arrival of jumbo jets


I shrug. I am always amused when people begin a sentence with "with all due respect" - which usually means an attempt at rebuttal.

planemanofnz wrote:
And wealthy Americans and Chinese would still find it 'difficult' to get to AIT, with a low-frequency jet service via AKL.


But not as difficult and with less assurance about personal safety.

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planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 2:49 am

mariner wrote:
Nor do I see how you can police this "low-frequency" service.

mariner wrote:
Who's going to say no?

Either:

- the free market, just as it has done in IUE, PPG, SON and WLS (all with low-frequency jet services); or
- local regulation, just as it has done in LDH (which limits the number of tourists at any given time, to ~400).

mariner wrote:
As I asked before, why do you care about my opinion?

Because, I respect you.

I really value your views - I love that I can bounce ideas off of you, knowing that you have insight yourself.

Cheers,

C.
 
planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 3:17 am

Fiji Airways recruit cabin crew

"MORE than 2000 people showed up at the Damodar Aquatic Centre for the Fiji Airways' open recruitment day to be a part of their cabin crew this morning.

Fiji Airways general manager for Inflight Service Delivery Edwin Aisake said the turn-out today was beyond expectations because more than 2000 people showed up with the number expecting to increase."


See: http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=422014.

The recruitment process includes interviews, group activities and a 50m lap swim:

Image

Cheers,

C.
 
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 3:58 am

planemanofnz wrote:
- the free market, just as it has done in IUE, PPG, SON and WLS (all with low-frequency jet services); or
- local regulation, just as it has done in LDH (which limits the number of tourists at any given time, to ~400).


How did these other islands come into this? Each has differing circumstances and Lord Howe manages just fine without jets.

The one thing the smaller islands have in common is that, apart from sun, sea and sand, none of the South Pacific islands has much in the way of natural resources (copra?) so how they mange those resources is critical. I think the Cook Islands would be well-served to maintain one island - just one - as the (almost) pristine, slower paced fantasy of the South Pacific.

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planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 5:16 am

mariner wrote:
How did these other islands come into this? Each has differing circumstances and Lord Howe manages just fine without jets.

Just as you sought to draw comparisons to DPS and SBH, I sought to draw comparisons to LDH and SON.

Specifically, the reference to LDH was merely to show that an island can regulate visitor arrivals, if necessary - it was not to raise a separate debate as to the viability of jet services there.

IMHO, LDH and SON, both being in the Pacific, are much more relevant comparisons than DPS and SBH.

mariner wrote:
The one thing the smaller islands have in common is that, apart from sun, sea and sand, none of the South Pacific islands has much in the way of natural resources (copra?) so how they mange those resources is critical. I think the Cook Islands would be well-served to maintain one island - just one - as the (almost) pristine, slower paced fantasy of the South Pacific.

The Cook Islands comprises 15 islands (not 2) - even if AIT was developed, these other islands would still maintain your "pristine, slower paced fantasy."

I still think that you have not proven how the development of jet services to AIT would destroy the "pristine, slower paced fantasy" of AIT. ~35,000 visitors already go to AIT annually - a seasonal weekly A320 service from AKL would only transport ~2,000 of these (~5-6%), while for a yearly service, the number would be ~8,000 (~22%).

Currently, RAR is close to breaking point - see: http://www.radionz.co.nz/international/ ... ustainable. Developing jet services to AIT will assist the Cook Islands to maintain the sustainability of RAR (reducing the need for AIT's visitors to use RAR's resources), while also allowing AIT to better compete with the incumbents, such as BOB.

Perhaps we should just agree to disagree on the AIT debate - there are plenty of other topics to discuss.

Cheers,

C.
 
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 5:25 am

Air Kiribati's (IK) Dash-8-100 arrived in Tarawa (TRW) earlier. There will be a series of proving flights scheduled before it joins revenue service alongside the Twin Otter and Harbin Y-12's in their fleet.
 
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 5:48 am

For those interested, VA has been blocked from opening AKL - APW, but will be allowed to open BNE - APW and SYD - APW, from next month.

See: https://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/busine ... zazkl.html.

Cheers,

C.
 
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 5:56 am

Solomon Islands seeks to grow Taiwanese visitor arrivals

"Although it is a diplomatic ally, the Solomon Islands only receives about 50 Taiwanese visitors per year, but it hopes to increase that number.

Embassy of the Solomon Islands in Taiwan Secretary Wang Yen-ting (王妍婷) said that after participating in the Taipei Tourism Exposition last year, the nation decided to further promote travel ties with Taiwan and attend the travel fair for the first time since 2008.

“It is a pity that although we are diplomatic allies, the Solomon Islands only sees about 50 Taiwanese visitors a year,” Wang said.

Wang said the embassy hopes to double that number next year through a partnership with a local tourism agency that is promoting a combined travel package for Australia’s Brisbane and the Solomon Islands."


See: http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/ ... 2003681325.

I assume that the BNE - HIR - BNE portion of the travel package noted above, will be on IE or VA - AFAIK, HIR could not handle BR or CI wide-bodies.

Cheers,

C.
 
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 6:08 am

planemanofnz wrote:
mariner wrote:
How did these other islands come into this? Each has differing circumstances and Lord Howe manages just fine without jets.

Just as you sought to draw comparisons to DPS and SBH, I sought to draw comparisons to LDH and SON.


I wasn't attempting to compare St. Bart's to anywhere, nor can I think of anywhere in the Pacific where that model could be completely applied. I was giving it as an example of an entirely successful model as a small resort island. Other islands have to decide for themselves which way they want to go.

planemanofnz wrote:
I still think that you have not proven how the development of jet services to AIT would destroy the "pristine, slower paced fantasy" of AIT. ~35,000 visitors already go to AIT annually - a seasonal weekly A320 service from AKL would only transport ~2,000 of these (~5-6%), while for a yearly service, the number would be ~8,000 (~22%).


But I'm not attempting to "prove" anything. From the git-go I have simply stated my preferences.

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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 6:19 am

planemanofnz wrote:
Solomon Islands seeks to grow Taiwanese visitor arrivals

"Although it is a diplomatic ally, the Solomon Islands only receives about 50 Taiwanese visitors per year, but it hopes to increase that number.

Embassy of the Solomon Islands in Taiwan Secretary Wang Yen-ting (王妍婷) said that after participating in the Taipei Tourism Exposition last year, the nation decided to further promote travel ties with Taiwan and attend the travel fair for the first time since 2008.

“It is a pity that although we are diplomatic allies, the Solomon Islands only sees about 50 Taiwanese visitors a year,” Wang said.

Wang said the embassy hopes to double that number next year through a partnership with a local tourism agency that is promoting a combined travel package for Australia’s Brisbane and the Solomon Islands."


See: http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/ ... 2003681325.

I assume that the BNE - HIR - BNE portion of the travel package noted above, will be on IE or VA - AFAIK, HIR could not handle BR or CI wide-bodies.


HIR can't handle anything much bigger than a 737 and given it's currently 50pax a year (and I doubt the number is any bigger for Solomon Islanders going to Taiwan), not much of a demand
 
planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 6:33 am

mariner wrote:
I wasn't attempting to compare St. Bart's to anywhere

In post #171 above, you said that AIT "should go high end," and then immediately below, cited SBH's development - to me, the implication from this is that you believe SBH to be a comparative model, upon which AIT should base its future development on.

NZ321 wrote:
This is indeed great news. I am a fan of seaplanes and can see this as a logical step in Tahitian Islands and elsewhere in the Pacific.

Interestingly, SG (SpiceJet) is in talks with Setouchi Holdings, to buy about 100 amphibious Kodiak planes that can land anywhere, including on water. It is part of an ambitious plan to connect India by air, without waiting for billions of dollars in airport upgrades.

See: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles ... sea-fields.

The Kodiak aircraft, which can seat either 10 or 14 people, is capable of taking off or landing on a 300-meter strip of water or land, and has a range of 1,000 km (621 mi). That would allow such planes to to fly to Pacific destinations that currently have no airports:

- Apia to Tokelau (517 km)
- Mangareva to the Pitcairn Islands (691 km)
- Nuku'alofa to the Kermadec Islands (943 km) - although re-fuelling for the return leg of this route could be an issue

Whether or not these services would be commercially and politically viable, is debatable. :stirthepot:

Cheers,

C.
 
Mortyman
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 8:13 am

planemanofnz wrote:
mariner wrote:
I wasn't attempting to compare St. Bart's to anywhere

In post #171 above, you said that AIT "should go high end," and then immediately below, cited SBH's development - to me, the implication from this is that you believe SBH to be a comparative model, upon which AIT should base its future development on.

NZ321 wrote:
This is indeed great news. I am a fan of seaplanes and can see this as a logical step in Tahitian Islands and elsewhere in the Pacific.

Interestingly, SG (SpiceJet) is in talks with Setouchi Holdings, to buy about 100 amphibious Kodiak planes that can land anywhere, including on water. It is part of an ambitious plan to connect India by air, without waiting for billions of dollars in airport upgrades.

See: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles ... sea-fields.

The Kodiak aircraft, which can seat either 10 or 14 people, is capable of taking off or landing on a 300-meter strip of water or land, and has a range of 1,000 km (621 mi). That would allow such planes to to fly to Pacific destinations that currently have no airports:

- Apia to Tokelau (517 km)
- Mangareva to the Pitcairn Islands (691 km)
- Nuku'alofa to the Kermadec Islands (943 km) - although re-fuelling for the return leg of this route could be an issue

Whether or not these services would be commercially and politically viable, is debatable. :stirthepot:

Cheers,

C.



Would be cool to go to Tokelau and Pitcairn :-) Not a lot of tourism on Pitcairn and proabably even less on Tokelau ...
 
DavidByrne
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 8:26 am

planemanofnz wrote:
Nuku'alofa to the Kermadec Islands (943 km) - although re-fuelling for the return leg of this route could be an issue

You have to be kidding! No one lives on the Kermadecs (aside from some DOC staff rotated in and out). No infrastructure, less than zero chance of it ever being a “destination” as you term it. Please don’t take this thread into silly fantasy territory - people will stop reading it.
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mariner
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:28 am

planemanofnz wrote:
mariner wrote:
I wasn't attempting to compare St. Bart's to anywhere

In post #171 above, you said that AIT "should go high end," and then immediately below, cited SBH's development - to me, the implication from this is that you believe SBH to be a comparative model, upon which AIT should base its future development on..


I said that AIT should go high end, but then, because you had somehow assumed I meant backpackers and three star hotels, I gave you an example of a high end tourist island. The circumstances of St. Barts are quite different from AIT. Unlike the Cook Islands, St. Barts is not independent, it is part of France.

But - again - St. Barts is only one form of high end, there are others. Mustique is so exclusive it's almost impossible to get in unless you're royal or richer than Croesus or I could have given you a long thesis on the rise, fall and subsequent stabilisation of the Mallorcan tourism industry, but as said in my preceding post, I'm not trying to prove anything.

mariner
Last edited by mariner on Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:43 am, edited 2 times in total.
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planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:36 am

DavidByrne wrote:
You have to be kidding! No one lives on the Kermadecs (aside from some DOC staff rotated in and out). No infrastructure, less than zero chance of it ever being a “destination” as you term it. Please don’t take this thread into silly fantasy territory - people will stop reading it.

The Kermadec Islands are already a destination - you are incorrect.

Herritage Expeditions regularly run cruises there (the next one being in March 2018), which include hikes ashore Raoul Island - for example, from Boat Cove to the Department of Conservation Base, the Green Lake Walk, as well as the Water Supply Walk. These cruises also include significant bird and wildlife-related viewings, including visits to the Meyer Islets, to witness a range of birds returning there in the evening. The ability to observe these birds, like the black-winged petrel and the white-naped petrel, is a huge draw-card for the islands, as many of these birds are found nowhere else in the world. Separately, diving activities are also facilitated - the extensive marine reserve has some of "the best diving in the South Pacific" (DOC's words - not mine).

See:
- https://www.heritage-expeditions.com/tr ... arch-2018/.
- http://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recrea ... c-islands/.

The viability of any sea-plane service to/from the Kermadecs is questionable, given the distances involved, as well as the lack of re-fuelling there. However, with greater range, it is not unreasonable to envisage same-day return charter flights.

Ultimately, why a plain statement warrants personal attacks from you, like "fantasy" and "silly," is beyond me - nobody is forcing you to read this thread, so please either make a substantive contribution here, or take your intolerance elsewhere.

mariner wrote:
St. Martin is only one form of high end, there are others.

Exactly - IMHO, just because some high-end islands only have turbo-prop services, does not mean that AIT should necessarily follow in their footsteps.

Cheers,

C.
 
DavidByrne
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 10:23 am

Sorry, but I still think the Kermadecs are a silly fantasy and I reserve my right to say so. I think you’re being very thin-skinned if I may say so.
This is not my beautiful house . . . This is not my beautiful wife
 
planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 10:33 am

DavidByrne wrote:
Sorry, but I still think the Kermadecs are a silly fantasy and I reserve my right to say so. I think you’re being very thin-skinned if I may say so.

You are completely entitled to have an opinion on the Kermadec Islands, as well as on the viability of any sea-plane service there.

However, you are not entitled to demand that others stop posting about a topic, just because their views do not align with yours, or to engage in name-calling.

Cheers,

C.
 
DavidByrne
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 11:02 am

QED
This is not my beautiful house . . . This is not my beautiful wife
 
planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 11:55 am

Air Vanuatu growth

Joseph Laloyer, Air Vanuatu’s chief executive officer has said the airline is enjoying strong growth and promising forward bookings thanks to a solid foundation and a returned confidence in the airline.

“Our forward bookings from Australia for January 2018 are up 40%, this is thanks to our post cyclone marketing strategy put in place, the VTO’s marketing campaign and our partnerships with other carriers.”

“We will also see growth from our New Zealand market and strong growth in New Caledonia as well – in the region of 40 and 80 percent respectively for January compared to last year."


See: https://www.airvanuatu.com/home/contact ... aying-off/.

It is encouraging to see growth at NF - average load factors for its Australian flights last year (which I appreciate do not tell the full story) were only ~67%.

NF's growth at AKL might encourage NZ to return to VLI, once VLI's runway repairs are done (see: http://dailypost.vu/news/vt-million-pro ... 1f84d.html).

Cheers,

C.
 
Mortyman
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 12:31 pm

I still don't get why it's important for AIT to have jets unless it is for increased tourism. Increased tourism for AIT I think would ruin the experience and as I mentioned in a post above, I am not sure the locals would approve such a development. Cook Islands in general has seen an increased tourism in the last 10 years and I have seen change since the first time I was there in 2006, and then in 2010 and now when I was this year in 2017. I don't nesseserely think that all the tourism is good for the islands. I felt it was alot more exotic and friendly, traditional and relaxed when I first visted in 2006.
 
planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 12:46 pm

Hi all,

Does anyone know how Talofa Airways is progressing with its expansion plans? In July, a spokesperson for the airline said that it was considering "Niue, Wallis and Futuna and Pukapuka in the northern Cooks as possible future destinations." See: http://www.radionz.co.nz/international/ ... y-to-tonga.

Pukapuka (in the Cook Islands) presently only has domestic flights from Air Rarotonga - therefore, the launch of an international flight by Talofa Airways from Apia (with the associated development of customs and immigration facilities at Pukapuka) would be a fascinating, though not unprecedented development there. AFAIK, Air Rarotonga previously linked Apia and Pukapuka, back in 2009 (see: http://www.stuff.co.nz/travel/2342796/R ... -air-route). Notably, this re-established service to Apia would be much more convenient for passengers, than a routing through Rarotonga - Pukapuka is about half the distance to Samoa (450 mi) than it is to Rarotonga (815 mi), and indeed, its culture is more closely related to that of Samoa's, than that of eastern Polynesia's.

Image

Cheers,

C.
 
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mariner
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:43 pm

planemanofnz wrote:
Nuku'alofa to the Kermadec Islands (943 km) - although re-fuelling for the return leg of this route could be an issue

Whether or not these services would be commercially and politically viable, is debatable.


I'm glad you added that rider because I think that If anyone tried to start air service to the Kermadecs there would be civil uproar, not just by the Greens, but by many who value conservation.

The islands are the most fragile environment, much of the native flora and fauna devastated by a previous encounters with mariners who, wittingly or not, bought rats, feral cats and invasive weeds with them. During the time the Bell family lived on Raoul, the pests were at epidemic proportions and probably contributed to the Bell's departure. Because no one was keeping records we have no idea how many species of wildlife were made extinct.

The DOC - Department of Conservation has done sterling work to to restore the islands to something like their original state. I believe the rats have been eradicated but I haven't seen a recent report on the feral cats. Tourism to the island exists only under the most stringent circumstances - the ship expedition you found is a one-off event, its previous visit was in 2016, and they don't stay on the islands, they sleep on the boat.

The only available accommodation is for DOC staff and support, and the "tourists" allowed in to stay are usually volunteers working for the DOC.

If someone started a seaplane service there'd be no hotel for them to use and good luck sleeping on the aircraft. I seriously doubt anyone would get permission to build a hotel - unless our new PM turns out to be a believer in Manifest Destiny - and there's no trade, so I can't see much point to such flights.

mariner
aeternum nauta
 
planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Tue Oct 31, 2017 12:22 am

mariner wrote:
Unlike the Cook Islands, St. Barts is not independent, it is part of France.

The Cook Islands are actually within the "Realm of New Zealand," under which Cook Islanders are New Zealand citizens, hold New Zealand passports, are represented at the United Nations by New Zealand, and receive New Zealand government services. Saint Barthélemy has a similar status to this, being an overseas collectivity of France, under which its islanders are French citizens, hold French passports, are represented at the United Nations by France, and receive French government services.

New Zealand has various constitutional obligations to the Cook Islands, as France does to Saint Barthélemy, with New Zealand investing in upgrading infrastructure and improving social services in the Cook Islands. Most recently, Bill English announced New Zealand's funding of a new wastewater system for Avana (in June 2017). Therefore, New Zealand funding for AIT's development is possible - it is not as though the Cook Islands are totally independent, with no economic support mechanism at all.

Mortyman wrote:
I still don't get why it's important for AIT to have jets unless it is for increased tourism.

There are various arguments for jet services improving the quality of tourism to the Cook Islands, including:

- AIT seeking to move up the value chain, and compete with BOB, but not having the hotel infrastructure to do so (that is to say, AIT could instead compete with BOB by offering the comfort and convenience of a jet service, which high-value visitors may be tempted by)
- RAR being close to breaking point, with direct flights to AIT potentially assisting the Cook Islands in maintaining the sustainability of RAR (that is to say, improved connectivity to AIT could reduce the need for visitors to AIT to transit in RAR, and use RAR's resources)

mariner wrote:
I'm glad you added that rider because I think that If anyone tried to start air service to the Kermadecs there would be civil uproar, not just by the Greens, but by many who value conservation.

I agree about the potential for uproar, though I would urge caution on the ability of such uproar to stop development around the Kermadecs - Maori bodies have filed legal action opposing the 'Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary,' saying that it would deny them of commercial rights agreed to in settlements pertaining to the Treaty of Waitingi (like fishing). The newly-elected government in New Zealand will consult with Maori on the Kermadecs, and IMO, any resolution could include (limited) Maori-incentivised tourism.

Cheers,

C.
 
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mariner
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Tue Oct 31, 2017 3:46 am

planemanofnz wrote:
The Cook Islands are actually within the "Realm of New Zealand," under which Cook Islanders are New Zealand citizens, hold New Zealand passports, are represented at the United Nations by New Zealand, and receive New Zealand government services. Saint Barthélemy has a similar status to this, being an overseas collectivity of France, under which its islanders are French citizens, hold French passports, are represented at the United Nations by France, and receive French government services.


Gosh, thanks for telling me what I already know.

I used live on the next door island, St. Martin, from where we used to zot over to St. Barts for week-ends and there is a difference between the somewhat ephemeral Realm of New Zealand and the much tighter Republic of France

The overseas territories and collectivities are France - just France Overseas. Citizens of St. Bart's can vote for the French President and the European Parliament. They are governed by local assembly and by the government of France. The Cook Islands. are not governed by Wellington, however close the relationship may be.

planemanofnz wrote:
I agree about the potential for uproar, though I would urge caution on the ability of such uproar to stop development around the Kermadecs - Maori bodies have filed legal action opposing the 'Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary,' saying that it would deny them of commercial rights agreed to in settlements pertaining to the Treaty of Waitingi (like fishing). The newly-elected government in New Zealand will consult with Maori on the Kermadecs, and IMO, any resolution could include (limited) Maori-incentivised tourism.


Maori is concerned about the Ocean Sanctuary, but that's the sea, not the land and if we're talking about developing at least Raoul then, as above, I think there would be considerable resistance. I have no idea whether that resistance would be successful or not.

If the resistance were not successful I think it would be a very great pity.

mariner
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planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Tue Oct 31, 2017 3:53 am

mariner wrote:
Gosh, thanks for telling me what I already know.

You said that the Cook Islands are "independent" in post #190 - I was merely trying to explain to you how that is, actually, incorrect.

Cheers,

C.
 
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mariner
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Tue Oct 31, 2017 4:06 am

planemanofnz wrote:
You said that the Cook Islands are "independent" in post #190 - I was merely trying to explain to you how that is, actually, incorrect.


Indeed, I misspoke. I should have said "self-governing."

mariner
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planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Tue Oct 31, 2017 9:23 am

A number of posts in this thread have been deleted today, including:

- FJ (Link) taking delivery of a new Twin Otter (DHC-6 Series 400) aircraft

- PX (Link) securing a new contract to provide services to Oil Search Limited

Can someone please elaborate as to how these breached the forum's standards?

Cheers,

C.
 
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VirginFlyer
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Tue Oct 31, 2017 4:44 pm

planemanofnz wrote:
A number of posts in this thread have been deleted today, including:

- FJ (Link) taking delivery of a new Twin Otter (DHC-6 Series 400) aircraft

- PX (Link) securing a new contract to provide services to Oil Search Limited

Can someone please elaborate as to how these breached the forum's standards?

Cheers,

C.

Did you post the bulk of the text of the article, or not provide a link to the original? Failing that, I would suggest contacting the moderators and asking.

V/F
It is not for him to pride himself who loveth his own country, but rather for him who loveth the whole world. The earth is but one country, and mankind its citizens. —Bahá'u'lláh
 
PieterBoth
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Tue Oct 31, 2017 5:03 pm

VirginFlyer wrote:
planemanofnz wrote:
nicode wrote:
Air Calin do not have turbo-prop planes.

Indeed, you are correct - it is clearly a mistake in the article.

Cheers,

C.

Indeed; it is semi-correct in that Air Vanuatu flies the route with the ATR 42, but Aircalin uses the A320
V/F


Air Calin have the twin otter that flies the WLS - FUT route.
 
planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Wed Nov 01, 2017 1:09 am

There has been strong capacity growth in the Pacific Islands this year - as 'Blue Swan Daily' notes:

"Our analysis shows that the strongest year-on-year growth in the South Pacific is being seen in Kiribati where departure capacity is up 181.7% across the first ten months of the year, and in the Northern Mariana Islands where a growth of 62.0% has been recorded across the same period, Noticeable capacity rises have also been recorded in 2017 from the Marshall Islands (up +41.1%), Tonga (+31.1%), New Caledonia (+23.3%) and the Solomon Islands (+18.0%)."

See: https://blueswandaily.com/analysis-nove ... the-month/.

Cheers,

C.
 
planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Wed Nov 01, 2017 4:13 am

CNMI agrees to US Air Force use of Tinian airport

"The Northern Marianas will allow the US air force to use the international airport on Tinian if the Anderson Air Force Base on Guam is rendered unusable.

The Pacific Air Force Divert and Exercise airport layout plan calls for the military to release $US375 million to improve the island's airport.

The Tinian mayor Joey Patrick San Nicolas said the improvements could lead to more international flights in the future."


See: http://www.radionz.co.nz/international/ ... an-airport.

Cheers,

C.
 
planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Wed Nov 01, 2017 4:17 am

Delivery Of Twin Otter A Step Up For Domestic Travel

"The arrival of Fiji Link’s first of the DHC-6 Series 400 Twin Otters on Monday marks a new journey when travelling domestically.

This new aircraft is a step-up from the existing 300 series with air- conditioned cabins and refreshing interiors and increased passenger comfort.

Not only that, an added feature is the state-of-the-art digital avionics systems and operating features in the cockpit. This is to enhance operational reliability and an easier transition for Fiji Link pilots to progress onto their upgraded fleet.

Fiji Airways group managing director and chief executive officer Andre Viljoen said they have purchased three of these modern Twin Otters with the other two aircraft to be delivered in the first half of 2018."


See: https://fijisun.com.fj/2017/11/01/edito ... ic-travel/.

Cheers,

C.
 
planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Wed Nov 01, 2017 4:18 am

Grounded Fiji Airways aircraft back in service

"THE Fiji Airways Boeing 737-700 aircraft that was involved in a cabin depressurisation incident last month is back in service.

While en-route to Honolulu, Hawaii from Christmas Island on October 10, Fiji Airways flight FJ822 was forced to descend from 35,000ft to 10,000ft after pressurisation systems on the aircraft allegedly failed."


See: http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=422165.

Cheers,

C.
 
planemanofnz
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Wed Nov 01, 2017 4:20 am

PieterBoth wrote:
Air Calin have the twin otter that flies the WLS - FUT route

I forgot about that - thank you for reminding us.

Does SB only have one of these planes now?

Image

Cheers,

C.
 
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mariner
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Wed Nov 01, 2017 7:23 am

Samoa "tells off" Virgin Australia:

http://www.radionz.co.nz/international/ ... -air-route

"Samoa tells off Virgin over air route

The Prime Minister of Samoa, Tuila'epa Sa'ilele Malielegaoi, reprimanded Virgin Australia, saying it was selling tickets for flights from Auckland to Samoa after the decade-long Virgin Samoa joint-venture ends in two weeks time. (on the 13 Nov)"


It looks to me as if his point is valid.

mariner
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LamboAston
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Wed Nov 01, 2017 7:51 am

planemanofnz wrote:
Grounded Fiji Airways aircraft back in service

"THE Fiji Airways Boeing 737-700 aircraft that was involved in a cabin depressurisation incident last month is back in service.

While en-route to Honolulu, Hawaii from Christmas Island on October 10, Fiji Airways flight FJ822 was forced to descend from 35,000ft to 10,000ft after pressurisation systems on the aircraft allegedly failed."


See: http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=422165.

Cheers,

C.

How long before its next incident? With two in two months, I wonder if they've fixed the problems or if its a hangar queen
AS350, B733/4/7/8, B744/8, B762/3, B77E/L/W, B789, A319, A320, A321, A332, A346, A380, AT73/5/6, Q300, Q400, CR2/7, E190, S340, B1900C/D, E110 (E for epic)
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ZK-NBT
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Re: Pacific Islands Aviation Thread

Wed Nov 01, 2017 8:03 am

What was the second incident? This aircraft should be retired soon not because of this incident, when do FJ get their first MAX?

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