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More Southwest Pressurization Issues

Posted: Mon May 21, 2018 2:53 am
by FlyHossD
Hoping this will display correctly...

Searching AvHerald today, I found this:

https://www.avherald.com/h?article=4b8d54bb&opt=0

Which reminded of this:

https://www.avherald.com/h?article=4b892e97&opt=0

You'll notice that it's the same aircraft - N732SW.

After the WN accident that landed in PHL, I'd expect the FAA to be all over Southwest.

Re: More Southwest Pressurization Issues

Posted: Mon May 21, 2018 4:03 am
by OKCDCA
FlyHossD wrote:
Hoping this will display correctly...

Searching AvHerald today, I found this:

https://www.avherald.com/h?article=4b8d54bb&opt=0

Which reminded of this:

https://www.avherald.com/h?article=4b892e97&opt=0

You'll notice that it's the same aircraft - N732SW.

After the WN accident that landed in PHL, I'd expect the FAA to be all over Southwest.

Why would the FAA be “all over Southwest” after nothing more than a possible faulty sensor? The crew received an indication that cabin pressure was dropping but was never actually lost. The crew did the right thing and diverted and passengers were reaccomodated. The nature of the beast that is a commercial airliner in 2018 is multiple computer systems and sensors feeding those computers. Like all things mechanical, at some point one is going to fail and/or give a faulty indication. Is it ideal, no, but it’s the nature of the types of systems we deal with this day in age. Purely coincidence that it’s the aircraft involved.

Non-event.

Re: More Southwest Pressurization Issues

Posted: Mon May 21, 2018 4:11 am
by WN732
Did you read the article?

Re: More Southwest Pressurization Issues

Posted: Mon May 21, 2018 4:12 am
by WN732
Did you actually read the article?

Re: More Southwest Pressurization Issues

Posted: Mon May 21, 2018 4:24 am
by Antarius
And in other news, overzealous aviation enthusiasts make a big deal over a sensor malfunction.

If the FAA got all over airlines for precautionary measures- either things would get worse or no one would be flying.

Re: More Southwest Pressurization Issues

Posted: Mon May 21, 2018 4:35 am
by Runway28L
Given how ridiculous the mainstream media has become in the past 2-3 years, of course every incident that is usually deemed a non-event following a major incident will get blown up by the media and will create a false image of danger for the general public.

Re: More Southwest Pressurization Issues

Posted: Mon May 21, 2018 4:48 am
by DocLightning
OKCDCA wrote:
Why would the FAA be “all over Southwest” after nothing more than a possible faulty sensor?


Pressurization/pressure sensing issue? Twice in a week? Same airframe?

In the history of commercial aviation, I have never heard of a single airframe experiencing the exact same class of failure twice to the point where it resulted in a diversion (and thankfully that's all it was).

The implication here is that WN didn't fix it correctly. And. That. Should. Not. Have. Happened.

Re: More Southwest Pressurization Issues

Posted: Mon May 21, 2018 4:52 am
by N626AA
Runway28L wrote:
Given how ridiculous the mainstream media has become in the past 2-3 years, of course every incident that is usually deemed a non-event following a major incident will get blown up by the media and will create a false image of danger for the general public.


I second that. Several upcoming trips this summer on WN and AA. All -700s on WN I believe. Not worried one bit.

Re: More Southwest Pressurization Issues

Posted: Mon May 21, 2018 6:07 am
by ikolkyo
DocLightning wrote:
OKCDCA wrote:
Why would the FAA be “all over Southwest” after nothing more than a possible faulty sensor?


Pressurization/pressure sensing issue? Twice in a week? Same airframe?

In the history of commercial aviation, I have never heard of a single airframe experiencing the exact same class of failure twice to the point where it resulted in a diversion (and thankfully that's all it was).

The implication here is that WN didn't fix it correctly. And. That. Should. Not. Have. Happened.


I bet it has happened before, all it would take is some digging on the avherald.

Re: More Southwest Pressurization Issues

Posted: Mon May 21, 2018 6:27 am
by Channex737
ikolkyo wrote:
DocLightning wrote:
OKCDCA wrote:
Why would the FAA be “all over Southwest” after nothing more than a possible faulty sensor?


Pressurization/pressure sensing issue? Twice in a week? Same airframe?

In the history of commercial aviation, I have never heard of a single airframe experiencing the exact same class of failure twice to the point where it resulted in a diversion (and thankfully that's all it was).

The implication here is that WN didn't fix it correctly. And. That. Should. Not. Have. Happened.


I bet it has happened before, all it would take is some digging on the avherald.



It has indeed happened before, Jet2 737-300 G-CELI had 2 decompression in as many weeks, the aircraft was subsequently scrapped.

Re: More Southwest Pressurization Issues

Posted: Mon May 21, 2018 6:46 am
by 32andBelow
Yah when a plane has a problem sometimes it’s recurring. Just like anything else in the world.

Re: More Southwest Pressurization Issues

Posted: Mon May 21, 2018 1:10 pm
by Cubsrule
DocLightning wrote:
OKCDCA wrote:
Why would the FAA be “all over Southwest” after nothing more than a possible faulty sensor?


Pressurization/pressure sensing issue? Twice in a week? Same airframe?

In the history of commercial aviation, I have never heard of a single airframe experiencing the exact same class of failure twice to the point where it resulted in a diversion (and thankfully that's all it was).

The implication here is that WN didn't fix it correctly. And. That. Should. Not. Have. Happened.


. . . except that it pretty obviously wasn't the same problem. The cabin actually depressurized in the first incident. Not so in the second. It's hard to come up with a scenario where a single bad sensor will cause depressurization. Like most aircraft systems, there are redudancies.