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LTenEleven
Posts: 439
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Tue Aug 14, 2018 8:56 pm

The situation with not allowing people self connect to Ryanair flights is ridiculous. It makes little difference if a passenger clears security in the connection facility or goes landside and back upstairs to departures (if anything, staying airside gives passengers more time in the shops and restaurants).

AmricanShamrok wrote:
JAmie2k9 wrote:
LTenEleven wrote:
What does the the new transfer facility mean for one stop security country ("clean") travellers connecting through Dublin? Do they still have to clear security?


daa security no longer required for tier one counties and a quicker connection process overall.

What countries are tier one? Is there a list somewhere? Google isn't throwing out anything useful.


The One Stop Security countries are listed here:
https://ec.europa.eu/transport/modes/ai ... icy/oss_en
(+ the EU of course)
 
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AmricanShamrok
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Tue Aug 14, 2018 9:10 pm

Does preclearance stay open in the event of late night delayed departures like these?
 
JAmie2k9
Posts: 1995
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 5:15 pm

Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Tue Aug 14, 2018 9:54 pm

AmricanShamrok wrote:
Does preclearance stay open in the event of late night delayed departures like these?


Not in DUB, if the last scheduled departure is running 2-3 hours late they will allow them to be cleared but AA to JFK didn't clear.

Normally they would have cancelled the flight.
 
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AmricanShamrok
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Tue Aug 14, 2018 10:05 pm

Just following on from that AA88 (PHL-SNN) delay; the return flight, AA89, just departed SNN but will be diverted to JFK with an ETA of 01:09 local. The flight is scheduled to continue to PHL at 04:00 with an arrival at PHL at 04:58 local...bizarre. Anyone know what the story is with this? My first thought is that PHL might have a night time restriction but why then wouldn’t they just delay the departure from SNN for another few hours?
Last edited by AmricanShamrok on Tue Aug 14, 2018 10:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
JAmie2k9
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Tue Aug 14, 2018 10:08 pm

Crew Change?
 
EI564
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Wed Aug 15, 2018 2:45 am

LTenEleven wrote:
The situation with not allowing people self connect to Ryanair flights is ridiculous. It makes little difference if a passenger clears security in the connection facility or goes landside and back upstairs to departures (if anything, staying airside gives passengers more time in the shops and restaurants).

I was told before that it was a Customs requirement. Skipping Customs if you are a regular connecting passenger is ok since Customs are aware of the people apparently. But self-connections allows people to slip through.
 
VFRonTop
Posts: 353
Joined: Fri Oct 12, 2012 6:02 pm

Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Wed Aug 15, 2018 6:53 am

EI564 wrote:
I was told before that it was a Customs requirement. Skipping Customs if you are a regular connecting passenger is ok since Customs are aware of the people apparently. But self-connections allows people to slip through.


I'm not disputing what you were told but that really doesn't make any sense. No-one skips customs as checks are on exiting after the baggage hall (Blue/Green/Red Channel)
 
BrianDromey
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Wed Aug 15, 2018 7:56 am

OA260 wrote:
Totally agree. Anything under 90 mins at DUB is just stupid to give someone IMHO. The number of times I see people stressing on the flight when there is a delay and then annoying crew over connections is just not worth the risk.


I personally wouldn't mind a USA-UK/CDG/AMS/etc connection of around an hour. Sure there is a risk of missing the connection, but on a protected connection on a high frequency route I would probably take a chance. That said, I wouldn't be very happy with anything less than 90 minutes and would prefer about 2 hours on the outbound. If self-connecting I prefer an overnight on the outbound.

Good to see that DUB are investing in the HUB part of the DUB HUB.
 
eirflot
Posts: 330
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Wed Aug 15, 2018 8:47 am

I am a bit surprised to read we are all so delighted that the DAA is assisting Aer Lingus with its hub operation! Is that not what the DAA are there for anyway or have I completely lost the plot? Why is it necessary to compliment late or forced decisions!
 
Skyblue39
Posts: 498
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Wed Aug 15, 2018 9:09 am

July was Dublin Airport’s busiest month ever....still on course to hit 31M passengers in 2018.

Dublin Airport welcomed more than 3.3 million passengers in July, making it the busiest month ever in the airport’s 78 year history.

Passenger numbers increased by 7% compared to last July as Dublin Airport welcomed more than 100,000 passengers every day during the month.

Passenger volumes to and from continental Europe increased by 6%, with more than 1.8 million passengers travelling to European destinations.

UK traffic increased by 3%, as more than 919,000 passengers travelled on routes between Dublin and UK destination in July.

The number of passengers travelling to and from North America increased by 15%, with almost 463,000 passengers taking transatlantic flights to and from Dublin last month.

Other international traffic, principally to the Middle East, North Africa and the Asia Pacific region increased by 19%, with almost 109,000 passengers travelling these routes in July.

Almost 200,000 passengers used Dublin Airport as a gateway to connect onward to another destination in July, which was a 26% increase compared to the same month last year. So far this year, transfer passenger numbers have increased by 17% to more than 952,000.

Domestic passengers increased by 10% to just over 11,000 in July.

More than 18 million passengers have travelled through Dublin Airport between January and July, which is a 6% increase over the same period last year. More than one million additional passengers have been welcomed during the first seven months of the year.

https://www.dublinairport.com/latest-ne ... month-ever
 
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OA260
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Wed Aug 15, 2018 9:27 am

VFRonTop wrote:
EI564 wrote:
I was told before that it was a Customs requirement. Skipping Customs if you are a regular connecting passenger is ok since Customs are aware of the people apparently. But self-connections allows people to slip through.


I'm not disputing what you were told but that really doesn't make any sense. No-one skips customs as checks are on exiting after the baggage hall (Blue/Green/Red Channel)


I really dont see the logic in that either but sometimes things at DUB have no logic ;) .


BrianDromey wrote:
OA260 wrote:
Totally agree. Anything under 90 mins at DUB is just stupid to give someone IMHO. The number of times I see people stressing on the flight when there is a delay and then annoying crew over connections is just not worth the risk.


I personally wouldn't mind a USA-UK/CDG/AMS/etc connection of around an hour. Sure there is a risk of missing the connection, but on a protected connection on a high frequency route I would probably take a chance. That said, I wouldn't be very happy with anything less than 90 minutes and would prefer about 2 hours on the outbound. If self-connecting I prefer an overnight on the outbound.

Good to see that DUB are investing in the HUB part of the DUB HUB.


I always like to give an extra hour and have time to relax. These minimum connecting times are just that ''minimum'' its the tightest allowed connection which is not my idea of fun. Over the years I have just seen too many stressed out people at airport connection centers and onboard planes having heart attacks because their holiday company booked them such a short connection or they did it themselves not thinking it through.

The last time I saw it at DUB was with a group of 20 American cruise passengers flying USA-DUB-BCN they were literally seconds away from missing it and in turn their cruise. Some things are just not worth it.
 
eirflot
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Wed Aug 15, 2018 9:59 am

I thnk the airlines bare some responsibility too - I have been given very short connecting times by airlines at airports that are renowned for connection delays - CDG and LHR for example
I have no problem with LX and a 35 minute connecting time at Zurich. I am not a fan of Frankfurt on arrival from Dublin - great that there are 5 LH fligyrs daily but arrival in Frankfurt always feels like an arrival from a third world country!
 
dstc47
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Thu Aug 16, 2018 7:33 am

Airline assumptions about connecting times seem to be rooted in the past, before airport growth, traffic growth leading to no spare seats and security related delays. They also seem to assume every passenger can run a four-minute mile from A1 to Z99.

Especially irritating is when booked flights, with reasonable connecting times, are retimed to cut any transit margin to the bone.

A Dublin Airport aircraft cleaner who found a mobile phone on an aircraft, and then brought it home, has lost an appeal against unfair dismissal.
 
Skyblue39
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Thu Aug 16, 2018 11:11 am

Any word on the EI TATL destinations yet?
 
planemanofnz
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Thu Aug 16, 2018 12:52 pm

Does anyone know why none of the EI 320's/321's have sharklets, and do they plan on refurbishing them to include these?

Cheers,

C.
 
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alancostello
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Thu Aug 16, 2018 1:45 pm

planemanofnz wrote:
Does anyone know why none of the EI 320's/321's have sharklets, and do they plan on refurbishing them to include these?

Cheers,

C.


It requires extensive wing work, and the benefits in fuel reduction over the added weight wouldn't be noticeable on the majority of EI's flights due to typically short sector length, they literally wouldn't make the money back. Some of the longer routes (Canaries, Poland, Greece) would benefit, but they'd end up with a small sub-fleet of sharklet-fitted aircraft which would be a nightmare to manage logistically when currently all aircraft are of similar config and can be swapped in and out easily.
 
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OA260
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Thu Aug 16, 2018 1:53 pm

Richard Curran: Did we sell Aer Lingus too low?

Last week I was fortunate enough to fly home to Ireland after a very enjoyable summer holiday. The Aer Lingus flight from Geneva to Dublin was like many others I had taken with the airline over several decades.

It is always nice to see that Aer Lingus logo, the sound of Irish accents and the familiar tones of a reassuring Aer Lingus flight captain (probably from Clontarf) that the weather in Dublin "isn't quite as good as here in Geneva".
Perhaps the most reassuring part of the whole customer experience is how little has changed three years after the takeover of Aer Lingus by British Airways' parent group IAG.

https://m.independent.ie/business/irish ... 20381.html
 
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ClassicLover
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Thu Aug 16, 2018 2:17 pm

OA260 wrote:
Richard Curran: Did we sell Aer Lingus too low?

https://m.independent.ie/business/irish ... 20381.html


Pretty fair article all round.

Of course IAG got a good deal, they purchased at the right time. However, it has also been fantastic for Aer Lingus and I seriously doubt we would have seen so much expansion without them being part of the larger group.

I was a huge proponent of Aer Lingus being purchased and I am pleased it has gone well. Hopefully it continues to do so.
I do enjoy a spot of flying, especially when it's not in economy!
 
cc47
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Thu Aug 16, 2018 8:26 pm

Air France's Hop is to upgauge Cork-Paris service from ERJ170 to the larger ERJ190 from 28th October. Fantastic to see them doing well on this route.
 
JAmie2k9
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Fri Aug 17, 2018 12:39 am

Chances are they could have gotten slightly more on the sale but happy it went when it did. I am not convinced IAG have done a lot yet, yes growth has been strong however I believe had they not been sold growth would still have been rapid but prehaps one less aircraft than this summer. IMO the first real sign of IAGs role is delivery of 4 A321LR next year and potentially another 4 (excluding 4 replacing B757). Such growth would take a lot longer.

Can't help but wonder would the A350s come without IAG, 2018 discussion could have been very different.
 
KeevaOS
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Fri Aug 17, 2018 1:55 am

Skyblue39 wrote:
Any word on the EI TATL destinations yet?


I was wondering the same... They mentioned within 2 to 3 weeks... Hopefully Montreal to compete with Air Canada and partially Norwegian. and also Dallas! I think PIT is out of the cards now, after BA announcing it.
 
LH982
Posts: 174
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Fri Aug 17, 2018 4:30 am

planemanofnz wrote:
Does anyone know why none of the EI 320's/321's have sharklets, and do they plan on refurbishing them to include these?

Cheers,

C.


The 321s and early 320s are between 15 and 20 years old, and are more likely to be heading for new homes or retirement. Expect to see new CEO or NEO frames in a few years, but not mods to the existing fleet.
 
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OA260
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Fri Aug 17, 2018 8:19 am

ClassicLover wrote:
OA260 wrote:
Richard Curran: Did we sell Aer Lingus too low?

I seriously doubt we would have seen so much expansion without them being part of the larger group.

.


Totally agree we have seen big advances since IAG took over and long may it continue. Still a lot to do in some areas especially how IRROPS are handled at out stations.
 
BrianDromey
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Fri Aug 17, 2018 9:21 am

OA260 wrote:
ClassicLover wrote:
OA260 wrote:
Richard Curran: Did we sell Aer Lingus too low?

I seriously doubt we would have seen so much expansion without them being part of the larger group.

.


Totally agree we have seen big advances since IAG took over and long may it continue. Still a lot to do in some areas especially how IRROPS are handled at out stations.


I don't think EI would have taken on as many A330s over the past few years, I also doubt they would have ordered so many A321LRs. Adopting Avios has, overall, been positive for me, but I think the AerClub launch was terrible. Hopefully EI will have reflected on what went wrong. Its one thing to bungle the launch of an FFP, another to get the A321LR wrong. I think IAG, as a whole, have underinvested in IT and self-service options, compared to their US counterparts.
 
JAmie2k9
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Sat Aug 18, 2018 11:41 am

https://www.independent.ie/business/iri ... 27505.html

Dublin Airport Authority (DAA), which runs the airports in Dublin and Cork, is to consult with An Bord Pleanála (ABP) about proposed changes to its planned second main runway - known as the North Runway.

The main change proposed is that the outer shoulder areas on either side of the runway - which are within the 75m width - will be changed from fully paved to reinforced grass, in line with new EASA guidelines.

Following consultation with airlines, a number of taxiways relating to the new runway development will either be relocated or removed. There are also some planned minor changes to roads on the airfield.
_____

https://fora.ie/dublin-airport-new-runw ... 2-Aug2018/

'A disservice to the nation': Pilots say Dublin Airport's new runway will be too short
The Irish Air Line Pilots’ Association claims the length will stop DAA from developing new routes.
____
Cannot see it having a significant impact on new routes and since when did they start caring about everybody else! There does appear to be a few months delay most likely because of these changes from late 2021 to early 2022. Once its operational by summer season 2022 there shouldn't be any significant problems.
 
eirflot
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Sat Aug 18, 2018 11:50 am

It's not that IALPA cares about everybody else, they don't care about anyone at all.
Though saying that I am no great fan of the DAA - it would not be a surprise if the new runway was not all that it could be
We have a tendency to build late, build smaller than needed and then comlain!!!
 
JAmie2k9
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Sat Aug 18, 2018 12:32 pm

eirflot wrote:
It's not that IALPA cares about everybody else, they don't care about anyone at all.
Though saying that I am no great fan of the DAA - it would not be a surprise if the new runway was not all that it could be
We have a tendency to build late, build smaller than needed and then comlain!!!


The daa did look at 3,660m in 2009, however it would require a new planning application. Modern aircraft performance is rapidly improving like B787 and A350 show. Fully loaded may be a problem on the odd route but to be honest its not at all a major issue.
 
kaitak
Topic Author
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Sat Aug 18, 2018 12:38 pm

When we can get A350s leaving the current 10/28 with little or no difficulty, I don't think the planned length of 10L/28R will pose any obstacles for any route the DAA might target.

It would be interesting to know what kind of routes IALPA believes is being prevented by the planned length .

I'd much rather see the DAA invest in developing terminal and handling capacity than lengthening the runway .
 
HTCone
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Sat Aug 18, 2018 1:15 pm

kaitak wrote:
When we can get A350s leaving the current 10/28 with little or no difficulty, I don't think the planned length of 10L/28R will pose any obstacles for any route the DAA might target.

It would be interesting to know what kind of routes IALPA believes is being prevented by the planned length .

I'd much rather see the DAA invest in developing terminal and handling capacity than lengthening the runway .


The A359 can get out of DUB at MTOW as things stand, as can the B78K, but that’s relatively range limited, certainly not capable of Far East flying. The A35K, B789 and B788 cannot get off current runway at MTOW.

Where the new runway at 3,110 meters will hinder growth is likely with the B778/9, and certainly large freighters. With it looking more and more likely that we’re going to lose the land bridge to the continent due a hard Brexit, more and more freight will need to go around the UK. We really should be aspiring to ship huge amounts of food, pharmaceuticals and other products to China, and getting in components for our tech manufacturing industries. You need large freighters for this (Basically MD11, B77L, 744F, 748F) and all of these aircraft would have to either limit their load or make a fuel stop en-route.
 
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alancostello
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Sat Aug 18, 2018 4:53 pm

HTCone wrote:
kaitak wrote:
When we can get A350s leaving the current 10/28 with little or no difficulty, I don't think the planned length of 10L/28R will pose any obstacles for any route the DAA might target.

It would be interesting to know what kind of routes IALPA believes is being prevented by the planned length .

I'd much rather see the DAA invest in developing terminal and handling capacity than lengthening the runway .


The A359 can get out of DUB at MTOW as things stand, as can the B78K, but that’s relatively range limited, certainly not capable of Far East flying. The A35K, B789 and B788 cannot get off current runway at MTOW.

Where the new runway at 3,110 meters will hinder growth is likely with the B778/9, and certainly large freighters. With it looking more and more likely that we’re going to lose the land bridge to the continent due a hard Brexit, more and more freight will need to go around the UK. We really should be aspiring to ship huge amounts of food, pharmaceuticals and other products to China, and getting in components for our tech manufacturing industries. You need large freighters for this (Basically MD11, B77L, 744F, 748F) and all of these aircraft would have to either limit their load or make a fuel stop en-route.


How about A380 to Dubai and beyond? I know we’d need the gate for it first, but how does it work with the current/future runways?
 
mast2407
Posts: 148
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Sat Aug 18, 2018 5:31 pm

alancostello wrote:
HTCone wrote:
kaitak wrote:
When we can get A350s leaving the current 10/28 with little or no difficulty, I don't think the planned length of 10L/28R will pose any obstacles for any route the DAA might target.

It would be interesting to know what kind of routes IALPA believes is being prevented by the planned length .

I'd much rather see the DAA invest in developing terminal and handling capacity than lengthening the runway .


The A359 can get out of DUB at MTOW as things stand, as can the B78K, but that’s relatively range limited, certainly not capable of Far East flying. The A35K, B789 and B788 cannot get off current runway at MTOW.

Where the new runway at 3,110 meters will hinder growth is likely with the B778/9, and certainly large freighters. With it looking more and more likely that we’re going to lose the land bridge to the continent due a hard Brexit, more and more freight will need to go around the UK. We really should be aspiring to ship huge amounts of food, pharmaceuticals and other products to China, and getting in components for our tech manufacturing industries. You need large freighters for this (Basically MD11, B77L, 744F, 748F) and all of these aircraft would have to either limit their load or make a fuel stop en-route.


How about A380 to Dubai and beyond? I know we’d need the gate for it first, but how does it work with the current/future runways?


I think there was a plan for to make Shannon a large cargo centre. I wonder if this forms part of a strategic connection to Dublin in this regard?
 
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OA260
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Sat Aug 18, 2018 5:38 pm

mast2407 wrote:
alancostello wrote:
HTCone wrote:

The A359 can get out of DUB at MTOW as things stand, as can the B78K, but that’s relatively range limited, certainly not capable of Far East flying. The A35K, B789 and B788 cannot get off current runway at MTOW.

Where the new runway at 3,110 meters will hinder growth is likely with the B778/9, and certainly large freighters. With it looking more and more likely that we’re going to lose the land bridge to the continent due a hard Brexit, more and more freight will need to go around the UK. We really should be aspiring to ship huge amounts of food, pharmaceuticals and other products to China, and getting in components for our tech manufacturing industries. You need large freighters for this (Basically MD11, B77L, 744F, 748F) and all of these aircraft would have to either limit their load or make a fuel stop en-route.


How about A380 to Dubai and beyond? I know we’d need the gate for it first, but how does it work with the current/future runways?


I think there was a plan for to make Shannon a large cargo centre. I wonder if this forms part of a strategic connection to Dublin in this regard?



This is from 2013 what actually happened?


Major Cargo Hub at Shannon would support Irish exports - International Aviation conference told

Delegates attend International Air Transport Association (IATA) conference at the Strand Hotel, Limerick The development of a cargo hub at Shannon Airport – one of the key pillars of the new Shannon Group plc’s long-term plans - will be key to supporting companies across the West of Ireland and beyond in accessing major emerging markets such as China, a global aviation conference staged in Limerick today heard. Patrick Edmond, newly appointed Managing Director of the Shannon Group’s International Aviation Services Centre (IASC), said that there is real potential to develop Shannon into an international crossroads for cargo. He was speaking at the International Air Transport Association (IATA) cargo conference at the Strand Hotel in Limerick.

www.shannonairport.ie/gns/about-us/late ... _told.aspx
 
BestWestern
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Sat Aug 18, 2018 6:56 pm

The concept of a major cargo Centre in Shannon is nuts. No industrial area within hundreds of kms. Consider Europe’s major cargo hubs - East Midlands, Liege and Cologne, etc. All based in the heart of industry and population. Cargo from Asia isn’t going to fly right over continental Europe to fly back east again.

FedEx uses an ATR42 ex SNN - that shows the amount of freight from the region.

Dublin has little or no dedicated cargo, so Shannon has no hope. It’s just a pipe dream.
Greetings from Hong Kong.... a subsidiary of China Inc.
 
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chrisnh
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Sat Aug 18, 2018 7:48 pm

Leased 763 and 777 operating DUB-BOS recently. Is an EI A330 having a problem somewhere?
 
kaitak
Topic Author
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Sat Aug 18, 2018 7:50 pm

Yes, EI-GCF was out of action for a few days. Saw the 767 land this morning.
 
HTCone
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Sat Aug 18, 2018 8:17 pm

ELA, GCF and LAX have all had issues in recent days.
 
dstc47
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Sun Aug 19, 2018 7:46 am

BestWestern wrote:
The concept of a major cargo Centre in Shannon is nuts. No industrial area within hundreds of kms. Consider Europe’s major cargo hubs - East Midlands, Liege and Cologne, etc. All based in the heart of industry and population. Cargo from Asia isn’t going to fly right over continental Europe to fly back east again.

FedEx uses an ATR42 ex SNN - that shows the amount of freight from the region.

Dublin has little or no dedicated cargo, so Shannon has no hope. It’s just a pipe dream.


Well said.

There have been many suggestions in the past that either Shannon, or Knock, could become a freight hub.
Even one that SNN could be a centre for distributing emergency disaster aid - it seemed not to notice that SNN is a long way from the ring of fire area where many earthquakes happen and would be about as useful as locating the National Maternity Hospital on the Aran Islands.
 
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OA260
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Sun Aug 19, 2018 10:11 am

Norwegian Air’s Irish subsidiary reports $445m loss

Europe’s third largest budget airline attributes jump in losses to cost of setting up new bases

Rising costs associated with the launch of transatlantic flights from Ireland to the US led the Dublin-based arm of Scandinavian airline Norwegian Air to report a $445 million (€391m) loss in 2017. This is more than double the $205 million loss it recorded a year earlier.

However, Norwegian Air International, which attributed the increased losses primarily to new base set-up costs, said it expected the airline to fare better in the years ahead on the back of increased business.

www.irishtimes.com/business/transport-a ... -1.3599405

---

Carlisle airport won’t open until 2019

Carlisle Lake District airport has suffered another setback to opening, with commercial services now not set to begin until the spring of 2019.

The airport was originally meant to open for commercial flights on 4 June this year, with Scottish carrier Loganair confirmed as a launch partner. However, it was announced in May that the opening would be delayed until 3 September.

Now, Stobart Group has taken the decision to delay the launch of commercial services until 2019 due to continuing shortages of qualified air traffic control staff, although the airport is open for general aviation purposes.

Kate Willard, head of corporate projects at Stobart Group, said: “We know how much the launch of commercial flights at the airport means for Cumbria, the south of Scotland and the Lake District.

“We have been working around the clock and physically we are ready. But it is extremely important that this major project, which will connect the region to the tourism and business hubs of London, Dublin and Belfast, is safe and operationally sustainable in the long term.

https://buyingbusinesstravel.com/news/1 ... irport-won’t-open-until-2019
 
Galwayman
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Sun Aug 19, 2018 5:22 pm

BestWestern wrote:
The concept of a major cargo Centre in Shannon is nuts. No industrial area within hundreds of kms. Consider Europe’s major cargo hubs - East Midlands, Liege and Cologne, etc. All based in the heart of industry and population. Cargo from Asia isn’t going to fly right over continental Europe to fly back east again.

FedEx uses an ATR42 ex SNN - that shows the amount of freight from the region.

Dublin has little or no dedicated cargo, so Shannon has no hope. It’s just a pipe dream.


That doesn’t make sense

SNN is the first airport in the EU from the Americas , it’s the perfect gateway for the EU 27 market , ideal location at the crossroads between 400 plus million Europeans and millions of Canadians , Mexicans and TrumpPeople

Geographically SNN is perfectly located , the Irish government should give full fifth freedom rights for cargo traffic if it hasn’t done so already
 
embraer420
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Sun Aug 19, 2018 11:25 pm

Galwayman wrote:
BestWestern wrote:
The concept of a major cargo Centre in Shannon is nuts. No industrial area within hundreds of kms. Consider Europe’s major cargo hubs - East Midlands, Liege and Cologne, etc. All based in the heart of industry and population. Cargo from Asia isn’t going to fly right over continental Europe to fly back east again.

FedEx uses an ATR42 ex SNN - that shows the amount of freight from the region.

Dublin has little or no dedicated cargo, so Shannon has no hope. It’s just a pipe dream.


That doesn’t make sense

SNN is the first airport in the EU from the Americas , it’s the perfect gateway for the EU 27 market , ideal location at the crossroads between 400 plus million Europeans and millions of Canadians , Mexicans and TrumpPeople

Geographically SNN is perfectly located , the Irish government should give full fifth freedom rights for cargo traffic if it hasn’t done so already


"TrumpPeople" - :rotfl:
You have a good point, but really, SNN is in the middle of nowhere. It would be quite hard to get a big cargo airline to start shipping via Shannon, why would they do that when 99.9%+ of what they're shipping is not going anywhere near Shannon. They could fly direct to LGG, CGN, FRA etc. on the continent and distribute their cargo from the there. Although, with investment in a decent cargo centre, and government incentives for airlines to ship via SNN, it might work, because if it's possible for pax to connect there (which it is), surely freight can, too. Same goes for DUB. They should really try and extend the new runway out to 3,660 metres, airlines like EK, EI, CZ, JL, AA and NH could use it, and if the runway is left at 3,110 metres long, other hubs will have an advantage over Dublin.

On a side note, with the new SU service to DUB, who thinks S7 will continue flying to Dublin? Or will they leave, or increase the number of weekly flights?
 
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OA260
Posts: 24912
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Mon Aug 20, 2018 8:27 am

10% increase in passengers flying local routes from Dublin to Kerry and Donegal

There is a 10% increase in passengers flying local routes from Dublin to Kerry and Donegal.

It follows the renewal of the Government contract for Public Service Obligation routes last February.

Aer Lingus Regional, operated by Stobart Air, says 23% of passengers on the Donegal/Dublin route take a day trip, while one-quarter of passengers are travelling for business.

On the Dublin/Kerry route, 27% of passengers travel for business, 13% use the service for leisure, one in 10 passengers take a day trip, and 15% stay overnight in Kerry.

The new contract should keep passengers flying local, until January 2022.

www.irishexaminer.com/breakingnews/irel ... 63263.html
 
eirflot
Posts: 330
Joined: Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:16 pm

Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Mon Aug 20, 2018 3:52 pm

Will be interesting to see how Aeroflot do. Having used them for more than 20 years (internally and internationally) they have greatly improved. Though I am still not a great fan of SVO - how I remember the old style passport control and security. The times I nearly read a complete novel waiting in "line"
 
embraer420
Posts: 139
Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2017 4:51 pm

Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Mon Aug 20, 2018 4:01 pm

eirflot wrote:
Will be interesting to see how Aeroflot do. Having used them for more than 20 years (internally and internationally) they have greatly improved. Though I am still not a great fan of SVO - how I remember the old style passport control and security. The times I nearly read a complete novel waiting in "line"


I think they'll do quite well. Their fares to Japan are excellent!
 
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OA260
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Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2006 8:50 pm

Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Mon Aug 20, 2018 4:06 pm

eirflot wrote:
Will be interesting to see how Aeroflot do. Having used them for more than 20 years (internally and internationally) they have greatly improved. Though I am still not a great fan of SVO - how I remember the old style passport control and security. The times I nearly read a complete novel waiting in "line"


They are already selling quite well on SVO BKK NRT HKG etc.. I think its taken even them by surprise. Excellent fares. I even know someone who has booked to DEL.

I remember the old SVO style when I flew SNN-SVO-DEL. Certainly a very different product now. I sometimes miss the old retro SU !
 
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ClassicLover
Posts: 5017
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Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Mon Aug 20, 2018 5:13 pm

Apparently lots of reader complaints are coming in to the Irish Times about Aer Lingus.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/consumer/pricewatch-readers-complaints-about-aer-lingus-are-flying-in-1.3597441

Looks like people are very unhappy!
I do enjoy a spot of flying, especially when it's not in economy!
 
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OA260
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Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2006 8:50 pm

Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Mon Aug 20, 2018 6:21 pm

Plane makes emergency landing at Shannon Airport after 'foul smell' causes passengers to fall ill

https://www.independent.ie/irish-news/p ... 33780.html
 
embraer420
Posts: 139
Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2017 4:51 pm

Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Mon Aug 20, 2018 10:04 pm

OA260 wrote:
I sometimes miss the old retro SU !


Don't we all
 
Skytrax
Posts: 7
Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2018 6:38 pm

Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Tue Aug 21, 2018 1:24 pm

ClassicLover wrote:
Apparently lots of reader complaints are coming in to the Irish Times about Aer Lingus.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/consumer/pricewatch-readers-complaints-about-aer-lingus-are-flying-in-1.3597441

Looks like people are very unhappy!


Cant say I am surprised. There are lots of stories about people being abandoned at out stations when things dont go to plan and taking to social media to tell the world. It does beg the question, for an airline this long in business, why they don't have a robust contingency plan in place for when things go wrong outside of DUB

It seems to be chaos everytime with passengers left to fend for themselves in the middle of the night, with no info and the local rep not giving a monkeys. Plenty of stories about lost luggage and the biggest gripe of all is lack of any response from "Customer Service" to questions. Again stuff an airline of Aer Lingus age should have down by now, esp with the technology available. Is this the result of constant tight beltining ?

Gav
 
embraer420
Posts: 139
Joined: Tue Sep 05, 2017 4:51 pm

Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Tue Aug 21, 2018 1:50 pm

Was booking flights DUB-GVA for next year, and I noticed that on March 16 LX411 is operated by a Brussels Airlines A319. Does anyone know anything about this?

P.S. The return flight a few days later is on an A220.
 
eirflot
Posts: 330
Joined: Tue Sep 19, 2017 8:16 pm

Re: Irish 8/18: An august institution

Tue Aug 21, 2018 2:01 pm

When you are offered euro off on the top EI sun routes at the height of the summer season, then perhaps everything is not as it should be!!!

I understand the focus on transatlantic and I appreciate it's profitable. But I think the continuing downward trend on European sevices will ultimately cut into transatlantic profitability- the European fed is important

Retro SU - aircraft? Service? Or brand?
I think I have been on every SU aircraft flown except for the 144! Sometimes it was simply amazing when some of the aircraft got off the ground! Some great pilots though!
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