FatCat
Posts: 962
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2018 2:02 pm

Re: Southwest flight diverted due to human heart left on board

Fri Dec 14, 2018 9:53 am

on my last trip to AMS (KML) there was a human organ traveling in the cabin, but it was carried by a person in charge of taking care of it, all the time.
didn't know what kind of organ was, but the box was labeled with Meyer's child hospital sticker, so hopefully had helped someone in need.
Aeroplane flies high
Turns left, looks right
 
PanHAM
Posts: 9731
Joined: Fri May 06, 2005 6:44 pm

Re: Southwest flight diverted due to human heart left on board

Fri Dec 14, 2018 10:43 am

I can only recommend to send human organs for Transplantation by on board courier. I have seen more than once that These couriers even jump the passport control lines to save minutes.
Was Erlauben Erdogan!!!
 
WayexTDI
Posts: 1226
Joined: Fri Sep 21, 2018 4:38 pm

Re: Southwest flight diverted due to human heart left on board

Fri Dec 14, 2018 1:32 pm

crj900lr wrote:
WayexTDI wrote:
crj900lr wrote:


Captain has final say on what goes on his/her aircraft.

Abuse of power? Damage caused to the image of the Company?, Yeah ok, let me say it one more time, Captain has final say on what goes on his/her aircraft.

Sure does. And HR has final say on his employment with said aircraft operator if they disagree with his final say.



It more then likely wouldn't even come close to that. There would be meetings and conference calls about it with the pilot who made the decision, along with union representation, and in the end they would probably agree that next time, depending on the situation at hand, better judgement should be used. Nobody is losing their job over it unless the pilot happens to have a history of doing this with no facts/answers to back it up, and even then I doubt it would happen. I'm not sure what industry you are in but where I'm at it takes more then just HR to say someone is fired/terminated/released from work.

Dude, you got to slow down.
Your own words were that the captain has the final say on what happens on his/her craft; that is true, within the limits of company policy and applicable country laws. And this is valid for any aircraft (private, biz jets or commercial airliners).

You have to remember that the captain is not God Almighty.
If the captain decides to do something that is illegal by law of the country of origin, destination or registration, he/she cannot do as it pleases him/her.
Most captains will use good judgment in what they decide to do; but if they decide to break the law, they will be terminated, and prosecuted as applicable.
Search "Air Cocaine" and you'll understand: captain and crew on a biz jets decided to smuggle 700 kg of cocaine on-board the plane they were flying. You can easily imagine what happened to them, even as "they had final say on what went on their aircraft".
 
mcdu
Topic Author
Posts: 1529
Joined: Thu Apr 28, 2005 5:23 am

Re: Southwest flight diverted due to human heart left on board

Fri Dec 14, 2018 3:05 pm

Sorry to discredit the transplant doctor but I have flown plenty of human transplant organs on commercial flights. Carried lungs recently in fact.

To ATCSundevil our company manual requires us to use the term “lifeguard” with our call sign. It’s also noted on our flightplan to use the term with all ATC communications.
 
rhody
Posts: 11
Joined: Thu Jan 30, 2014 5:41 am

Re: Southwest flight diverted due to human heart left on board

Fri Dec 14, 2018 6:00 pm

That seems unnecessarily harsh, mcdu. I’m not sure why you were focused on discrediting “the transplant doctor.”

I’m just another aviation enthusiast who was in perhaps a unique position to point out how the news article had to be wrong, or misleading at best. As we’ve learned since.

I don’t doubt that you’ve carried organs. As I said, many organs are carried by commercial carriers. There are several other accounts in just the posts above. With more than 10,000 organ donor operations each year in the U.S. (~30 per day), there are many thousands of organs that travel by commercial carrier to all corners of our country.

But with 30 years of experience in heart transplantation, involving hundreds of heart transplant operations and hundreds of “donor runs,” as we call them, I promise you this, mcdu....donated hearts for transplantation travel WITH a surgical team....and NEVER on a commercial flight. Every minute matters....so the routine is charter air, ambulance or police ground transportation usually with sirens to/from the airplane steps on the tarmac, sometimes helicopter transport between major metro hospitals and the airports, etc.

In the updated news reports, we’ve learned that this particular heart was not intended for any particular patient...and was never intended to be used for heart transplantation at all. But one of the wonders in medicine is that besides the “live organs,” many tissues in the body of a deceased donor can also be useful for other patients. These tissues (eg, heart valves, bone, blood vessels, corneas, etc.) can be removed from the donor, processed, and often cryopreserved for use weeks or months later for some needy patient. The processing of these tissues must start at some reasonable time after they are removed....and, thus, the need for this particular heart to arrive at a particular processing facility before the heart valves would no longer be useful.
Last edited by rhody on Fri Dec 14, 2018 6:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
User avatar
deltadawg
Posts: 1013
Joined: Sat May 13, 2006 2:56 am

Re: Southwest flight diverted due to human heart left on board

Fri Dec 14, 2018 7:25 pm

The wife of my old boss was a teaching physical therapist and her "carry-ons" were a specialized case holding a) preserved human arm from just below the shoulder, b) hand from wrist down and c) human leg from just above knee.

I never went through security with her but always wanted to just to see the reactions from ATL TSA!
GO Dawgs, Sic' em, woof woof woof
 
mcdu
Topic Author
Posts: 1529
Joined: Thu Apr 28, 2005 5:23 am

Re: Southwest flight diverted due to human heart left on board

Fri Dec 14, 2018 7:42 pm

rhody wrote:
That seems unnecessarily harsh, mcdu. I’m not sure why you were focused on discrediting “the transplant doctor.”

I’m just another aviation enthusiast who was in perhaps a unique position to point out how the news article had to be wrong, or misleading at best. As we’ve learned since.

I don’t doubt that you’ve carried organs. As I said, many organs are carried by commercial carriers. There are several other accounts in just the posts above. With more than 10,000 organ donor operations each year in the U.S. (~30 per day), there are many thousands of organs that travel by commercial carrier to all corners of our country.

But with 30 years of experience in heart transplantation, involving hundreds of heart transplant operations and hundreds of “donor runs,” as we call them, I promise you this, mcdu....donated hearts for transplantation travel WITH a surgical team....and NEVER on a commercial flight. Every minute matters....so the routine is charter air, ambulance or police ground transportation usually with sirens to/from the airplane steps on the tarmac, sometimes helicopter transport between major metro hospitals and the airports, etc.

In the updated news reports, we’ve learned that this particular heart was not intended for any particular patient...and was never intended to be used for heart transplantation at all. But one of the wonders in medicine is that besides the “live organs,” many tissues in the body of a deceased donor can also be useful for other patients. These tissues (eg, heart valves, bone, blood vessels, corneas, etc.) can be removed from the donor, processed, and often cryopreserved for use weeks or months later for some needy patient. The processing of these tissues must start at some reasonable time after they are removed....and, thus, the need for this particular heart to arrive at a particular processing facility before the heart valves would no longer be useful.


You made a blanket statement. In the case of the organs I’ve carried recently the team did drop the package plane side, traveled with us and met with the local team upon arrival. Perhaps they just wanted an expeditious ride and they were bluffing about the urgency.
 
smokeybandit
Posts: 1076
Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2014 3:24 pm

Re: Southwest flight diverted due to human heart left on board

Sat Dec 15, 2018 12:55 am

The story ends with the heart making it to its recipient.

https://sacramento.cbslocal.com/2018/12 ... acramento/
 
Armodeen
Posts: 1183
Joined: Wed Aug 28, 2013 10:17 am

Re: Southwest flight diverted due to human heart left on board

Sat Dec 15, 2018 1:27 am

mcdu wrote:
rhody wrote:
That seems unnecessarily harsh, mcdu. I’m not sure why you were focused on discrediting “the transplant doctor.”

I’m just another aviation enthusiast who was in perhaps a unique position to point out how the news article had to be wrong, or misleading at best. As we’ve learned since.

I don’t doubt that you’ve carried organs. As I said, many organs are carried by commercial carriers. There are several other accounts in just the posts above. With more than 10,000 organ donor operations each year in the U.S. (~30 per day), there are many thousands of organs that travel by commercial carrier to all corners of our country.

But with 30 years of experience in heart transplantation, involving hundreds of heart transplant operations and hundreds of “donor runs,” as we call them, I promise you this, mcdu....donated hearts for transplantation travel WITH a surgical team....and NEVER on a commercial flight. Every minute matters....so the routine is charter air, ambulance or police ground transportation usually with sirens to/from the airplane steps on the tarmac, sometimes helicopter transport between major metro hospitals and the airports, etc.

In the updated news reports, we’ve learned that this particular heart was not intended for any particular patient...and was never intended to be used for heart transplantation at all. But one of the wonders in medicine is that besides the “live organs,” many tissues in the body of a deceased donor can also be useful for other patients. These tissues (eg, heart valves, bone, blood vessels, corneas, etc.) can be removed from the donor, processed, and often cryopreserved for use weeks or months later for some needy patient. The processing of these tissues must start at some reasonable time after they are removed....and, thus, the need for this particular heart to arrive at a particular processing facility before the heart valves would no longer be useful.


You made a blanket statement. In the case of the organs I’ve carried recently the team did drop the package plane side, traveled with us and met with the local team upon arrival. Perhaps they just wanted an expeditious ride and they were bluffing about the urgency.


I would politely suggest that our learned colleague rhody here is actually speaking from a position of genuine expertise on the subject matter - a rare thing indeed on anet!

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