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brindabella
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:12 pm

Dupli wrote:
monomojo wrote:
2. Of course they will. I don't think Boeing or anyone else expects that Airbus won't sell plenty of aircraft at the bottom of the MoM segment. But as long as it's based on the A321, the bottom of the segment is always where it's going to be, and without a clean sheet redesign at best it will merely be competitive at the bottom, whereas right now they're the only option.
3. Of course they will. Airbus will have lots of scope to aggressively compete on price with the A321XLR.


In my opinion, you are looking too much at the a321-mom market segment. What is the effect of a rewinged and updated a320 on 737 sales?


Well, an even more visible effect would be the first intro of the NSA, in whatever sequence: (**)


cheers

(**) the glorious segment of the 320neo-family order book is the 321neo.

Expect BA to attack that directly!
(I am in a majority of one here - every other a-netter believes implicitly that BA will do the NMA ONLY and leave all else alone.

I think not! (Certainly NOT when Muilenberg is running the show, IMO.)

:smile:
Billy
 
bigjku
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:20 pm

brindabella wrote:
Dupli wrote:
monomojo wrote:
2. Of course they will. I don't think Boeing or anyone else expects that Airbus won't sell plenty of aircraft at the bottom of the MoM segment. But as long as it's based on the A321, the bottom of the segment is always where it's going to be, and without a clean sheet redesign at best it will merely be competitive at the bottom, whereas right now they're the only option.
3. Of course they will. Airbus will have lots of scope to aggressively compete on price with the A321XLR.


In my opinion, you are looking too much at the a321-mom market segment. What is the effect of a rewinged and updated a320 on 737 sales?


Well, an even more visible effect would be the first intro of the NSA, in whatever sequence: (**)


cheers

(**) the glorious segment of the 320neo-family order book is the 321neo.

Expect BA to attack that directly!
(I am in a majority of one here - every other a-netter believes implicitly that BA will do the NMA ONLY and leave all else alone.

I think not! (Certainly NOT when Muilenberg is running the show, IMO.)

:smile:


I don’t think they will leave the 737 alone. I think NMA will move further down the chain than people think and then they will come in with a very light plane to combat the A320neo directly.

Agree that the current CEO isn’t going to back down from competing. Boeing is going to come for the throat.
 
brindabella
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Feb 26, 2019 12:32 pm

seabosdca wrote:
bigjku wrote:
The A350 sold a lot, entered service and has struggled since sales wise. We can ascribe whatever reason we want for it but the longer sales stay low the less reasons like backlog and replacement cycles hold up.

The 77W replacement cycle thing I think is oversold around here. The biggest 77W operator is on the books for 150 77X. The next biggest split it’s repalcment plan and has 21 77X on order. The next biggest has 60 77X on order. I am not sure if Air France has ordered those replacements yet. Turkish is down for the 787 and A350 and possibly hasn’t replaced its 77W’s yet so there is another one. Singapore is replacing 27 77W with 20 77X. ANA has 28 77W with 20 77X on order.

I think the 777 repalcment race is already well underway. Of other big operators I expect to see a Korean order this year which I expect to go 787 and 77X. You then have your late arrivals to the 77W party in American and United who took some. Add to that whatever the Chinese do. What operators are we waiting on at this point that will really move the needle? Name an operator who is looking for a program starting number of orders on a plane larger than an A359 that isn’t already bought into the 77X.


That airline that already has 150 77X on order. No, seriously. And in general I don't think that an existing 77X order is a death blow for Airbus's prospects with an airline, especially where that airline is also ordering A350s.

With the A380 cancellation they still don't have enough capacity on order, even with the replacement Airbus orders. Assuming they absorb EY's and possibly some of QR's 777X slots in the near term, speeding delivery of their 77X order, they will need more lift right around the timeframe that people are bandying about for the A350neo. Would not be shocked to see them be a launch customer of the A350-1000neo (or the stretch variant!) with 50 orders.

Other airlines that I think could order significant numbers of A350neo are BA, AF, CX, TK, BR, JL, and the Chinese. Also SU might be interested in a European 777 replacement for political reasons if there is an electoral backlash to the current Kremlin-cozy US president.

To sort of get back toward the topic. I see this as a much more likely and much more profitable venture for Airbus than an all-new widebody A330neo replacement. Airbus's way to compete with the 797 is from below. One new A320 series wing, not two, is enough.



Very reasonable.

But ever more, the AB product-line seems to steadily contract into an A320 family/A350 strategy.

Meanwhile, against all logic and evidence, many a-netters STILL talk about BA reducing to 3 product-lines. :hissyfit:

Despite all the visible (and obvious) evidence that the BA sales superiority is increasingly based-upon a multitude of product-lines!


cheers
Billy
 
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Revelation
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Feb 26, 2019 1:07 pm

Lewton wrote:
Boeing needs to design a completely new line with 4 models going from 150 to 250 passengers at a typical US airline setup.
They don't need to update any of their current 737. They are all selling pretty OK at the moment considering how little their redesign cost.
They should aim to launch them by 2025 so that they can finally kill the A320 and capture a big part of the midsize market.

Anything else will allow Airbus' cash cow (the A320, potentially stretched further with an A322) to keep dominating its segment and this supporting Airbus efforts to come up with better models for the larger segments.

IMO we have to stop using such language.

I can't picture anything Boeing could do to kill the A320 in the 2025 time frame, just like I can't picture anything Airbus could do to kill the 737 in the same time frame.

This of course rules out anything stupid like intentionally taking massive losses to gain market share.

Both products have a lot of inertia and the industry as a whole gains a lot of benefits from a stable duopoly.

If the A320 was killed tomorrow Boeing could not make up the production shortfall, and vice versa.

A superior product (777 vs A340, A330 vs 767) can kill off a weaker product but it takes many years to happen.

In the aftermath the vendors make adjustments (A350, 787) and we all carry on.
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Bricktop
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Feb 26, 2019 1:20 pm

The notion of Boeing killing the A320 or conversely Airbus killing the 737 is ludicrous, and off topic. Airbus will end the A320 and Boeing the 737 with their follow ons. It is absurd to contemplate one OEM owning any more than maybe 60% of the single aisle family market. They just couldn't build them, as we can see right freaking now.

Please note I said FAMILY deliberately to stop the "But the A321 is selling 50 times the 737-10" retort. I did say please. And it's off topic. :tongue2:
 
planecane
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Feb 26, 2019 1:24 pm

Revelation wrote:
Lewton wrote:
Boeing needs to design a completely new line with 4 models going from 150 to 250 passengers at a typical US airline setup.
They don't need to update any of their current 737. They are all selling pretty OK at the moment considering how little their redesign cost.
They should aim to launch them by 2025 so that they can finally kill the A320 and capture a big part of the midsize market.

Anything else will allow Airbus' cash cow (the A320, potentially stretched further with an A322) to keep dominating its segment and this supporting Airbus efforts to come up with better models for the larger segments.

IMO we have to stop using such language.

I can't picture anything Boeing could do to kill the A320 in the 2025 time frame, just like I can't picture anything Airbus could do to kill the 737 in the same time frame.

This of course rules out anything stupid like intentionally taking massive losses to gain market share.

Both products have a lot of inertia and the industry as a whole gains a lot of benefits from a stable duopoly.

If the A320 was killed tomorrow Boeing could not make up the production shortfall, and vice versa.

A superior product (777 vs A340, A330 vs 767) can kill off a weaker product but it takes many years to happen.

In the aftermath the vendors make adjustments (A350, 787) and we all carry on.


Also, neither Boeing nor Airbus has the production capacity to kill the other's narrowbody line. If a new NB is enough "better" the producer would gain some market share and force the other company to lower prices so that ownership costs are at least in the same ballpark. This would lower margins and at a point it makes more sense to respond with a new program.

If Boeing decided to sell the 737MAX10 for half the price of the A321NEO, they'd win a lot more orders and the market share would be closer. However, that would kill the profitability of the 737 line so it makes no sense to do. Hence, it makes more sense to compete with a clean sheet NMA/797. The question will be if it makes enough sense to launch.
 
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par13del
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Feb 26, 2019 1:56 pm

planecane wrote:
If Boeing decided to sell the 737MAX10 for half the price of the A321NEO, they'd win a lot more orders and the market share would be closer. However, that would kill the profitability of the 737 line so it makes no sense to do. Hence, it makes more sense to compete with a clean sheet NMA/797. The question will be if it makes enough sense to launch.

So let's think about this some more, spend 10 billion on a new frame for which they do not have RLI, or lower the profitability of the 737-900ER / MAX-10 / MAX200 to regain some market share?
If it was that simple Boeing would be nuts to not implement a loss leader to increase sales of its slower selling product, as we are always told, after market support is huge.
The MAX8 is selling and generating all the bulk of the profits, cutting profitability on the poor selling models will not send the 737 program into a tail spin.
 
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bikerthai
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Feb 26, 2019 2:24 pm

par13del wrote:
So let's think about this some more, spend 10 billion on a new frame for which they do not have RLI, or lower the profitability of the 737-900ER / MAX-10 / MAX200 to regain some market share?


I'm not sure if that is the current consensus now at Boeing as it have been stated that Boeing will not sell plane for a loss just to gain market share. This was back when Airbus had the title of number one airplane manufacturer. Even now, I believe Boeing is O.K. with the A320 outselling the A737 if by a small margin as long as they maintain dominance in the wide body market (where the profit is). This is not going to change with the addition of the 797 and the emergence of COMAC narrow body.

bt
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bigjku
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Feb 26, 2019 2:41 pm

par13del wrote:
planecane wrote:
If Boeing decided to sell the 737MAX10 for half the price of the A321NEO, they'd win a lot more orders and the market share would be closer. However, that would kill the profitability of the 737 line so it makes no sense to do. Hence, it makes more sense to compete with a clean sheet NMA/797. The question will be if it makes enough sense to launch.

So let's think about this some more, spend 10 billion on a new frame for which they do not have RLI, or lower the profitability of the 737-900ER / MAX-10 / MAX200 to regain some market share?
If it was that simple Boeing would be nuts to not implement a loss leader to increase sales of its slower selling product, as we are always told, after market support is huge.
The MAX8 is selling and generating all the bulk of the profits, cutting profitability on the poor selling models will not send the 737 program into a tail spin.


The more practical problems I would say are as follows.

1. The 737 is expensive to produce and Boeing wants to eventually replace it with planes designed for modern, automatedmass production. You have to start somewhere and NMA will be where they start.

2. Simply selling more 737 (or A320neo) at this point really doesn’t do anything for you. The lines are full up. The engine builders hve out the stops on further capacity increases for the time being. Maybe they will go to 70 for Airbus and mid 60’s for Boeing but not until 2021 at the earliest. And frankly I don’t see them going further. Whatever you invest in increasing rate as a vendor you better make back by 2028-30 or so. There is lot much reason to sell lower margin products on a production limited line if you can make good margin on the 737-8 and keep it full.

3. Look at the life of the 737 and A320. What both companies are engaged in now will have ramifications over the next 30 years and possibly more. Getting NMA and then NSA in the right spots are what matter. Generating cash for those investments for the next 10 years or so is what matters. Market share of the 737-10 doesn’t matter. The ideal way to do this would be to shut off 737 production one day and have NSA ready to run at rate 60 the next. But that’s not practical. So Boeing is going to debug with NMA without really impacting what the 737 is currently doing to generate cash and then if NSA has a lot in common with it can start from a production base already making 10-12 of these a month rather than from zero because the new narrows for each airframer will have to be spun up production rate wise faster than any other modern jetliner ever has been.
 
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william
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Feb 26, 2019 3:04 pm

JayinKitsap wrote:
Jon Ostrower just posted an interesting article, the 7J7 cabin width is 10" narrower than the 767 in an old video from yesteryear.

https://theaircurrent.com/historical-co ... t-the-797/


I am glad some else remembers this concept. A double aisle domestic aircraft is not a new concept. At the time I thought it was a 767 body with a T tail. Interesting it was 10 inches narrower.
 
mjoelnir
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Feb 26, 2019 3:19 pm

bikerthai wrote:
par13del wrote:
So let's think about this some more, spend 10 billion on a new frame for which they do not have RLI, or lower the profitability of the 737-900ER / MAX-10 / MAX200 to regain some market share?


I'm not sure if that is the current consensus now at Boeing as it have been stated that Boeing will not sell plane for a loss just to gain market share. This was back when Airbus had the title of number one airplane manufacturer. Even now, I believe Boeing is O.K. with the A320 outselling the A737 if by a small margin as long as they maintain dominance in the wide body market (where the profit is). This is not going to change with the addition of the 797 and the emergence of COMAC narrow body.

bt


The narrow body frames, both at Boeing and Airbus are the cash cows, the main provider of profits.
 
morrisond
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Feb 26, 2019 3:28 pm

william wrote:
JayinKitsap wrote:
Jon Ostrower just posted an interesting article, the 7J7 cabin width is 10" narrower than the 767 in an old video from yesteryear.

https://theaircurrent.com/historical-co ... t-the-797/


I am glad some else remembers this concept. A double aisle domestic aircraft is not a new concept. At the time I thought it was a 767 body with a T tail. Interesting it was 10 inches narrower.



That's about where you get too if you take the width of an 737 Fuselage and add 20.5" for a seat and two Arm rests and an extra Aisle. NMA could be about 190" in width and if they are shooting for small containers about 170-175" in Height (A320 plus 7-12").

A nice tight and light 7W Fuselage at about 25% more surface area than an A320.
 
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par13del
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Feb 26, 2019 3:50 pm

bigjku wrote:
1. The 737 is expensive to produce and Boeing wants to eventually replace it with planes designed for modern, automatedmass production. You have to start somewhere and NMA will be where they start.

Does make you wonder why they did not stick to their guns and do the NSA when they wanted to, they had to know then how expensive it was to produce and whether they could simply lower the cost by just squeezing the vendors, can't blame everything on the NEO catching them off guard.
 
bigjku
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Feb 26, 2019 4:29 pm

par13del wrote:
bigjku wrote:
1. The 737 is expensive to produce and Boeing wants to eventually replace it with planes designed for modern, automatedmass production. You have to start somewhere and NMA will be where they start.

Does make you wonder why they did not stick to their guns and do the NSA when they wanted to, they had to know then how expensive it was to produce and whether they could simply lower the cost by just squeezing the vendors, can't blame everything on the NEO catching them off guard.


There is only so much you can do at once and the 787 blew a gaping hole in the side of the ship. They didn’t know if building planes that way would work. Since then I think they have decided what parts of the 787 process to keep, what to bring internal (wings clearly on that list) and how they want to apply it.
 
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seabosdca
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Feb 26, 2019 6:22 pm

brindabella wrote:
But ever more, the AB product-line seems to steadily contract into an A320 family/A350 strategy.

Meanwhile, against all logic and evidence, many a-netters STILL talk about BA reducing to 3 product-lines. :hissyfit:

Despite all the visible (and obvious) evidence that the BA sales superiority is increasingly based-upon a multitude of product-lines!


I'm not sure it's good for either OEM to have lots and lots of different types around. Every all-new type program in the last two decades has been massively over budget and at least a bit behind schedule. It's becoming harder and harder to engineer them. There is a lot of value in reusing existing work where possible--which is what a lot of the most obvious possible "next moves" for both OEMs do. Think about all these possibilities that could realistically be evaluated over the next decade or so:

- A320 rewing with a heavier wing, leaving the existing wing or a variant in place for lighter variants
- A350 stretch + maybe wing extension to neutralize 777X capacity advantage and leverage A350 weight advantage
- 787 heavier center wing box + new main gear + wing extension to take the 787 into 777X replacement territory
- A220 stretch + heavier main gear

All of these would cover markets that the OEMs are currently missing or will be missing in the near future, for far less money than all-new frames. Boeing's key strategic issue that it's working through is that it cannot address the A321 in this sort of way.
 
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par13del
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Feb 26, 2019 6:59 pm

The A321 issue is not new, Boeing for years have stated that the market in their line up for a 757 replacement was not there, and this was with the full knowledge that the reason why the 757 ceased selling was due to the A321 being a more efficient product for those who did not need the full capabilities of the 757.
The 737-9XX in any variant was to address the shortfall, the larger NG etc included,now things are changing, the need for the A321 size a/c is going from a trickle to a surge. If and I say if the 797 is finally launched I hope we will get more details on why it took so long to launch.
 
bigjku
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Feb 26, 2019 7:01 pm

seabosdca wrote:
brindabella wrote:
But ever more, the AB product-line seems to steadily contract into an A320 family/A350 strategy.

Meanwhile, against all logic and evidence, many a-netters STILL talk about BA reducing to 3 product-lines. :hissyfit:

Despite all the visible (and obvious) evidence that the BA sales superiority is increasingly based-upon a multitude of product-lines!


I'm not sure it's good for either OEM to have lots and lots of different types around. Every all-new type program in the last two decades has been massively over budget and at least a bit behind schedule. It's becoming harder and harder to engineer them. There is a lot of value in reusing existing work where possible--which is what a lot of the most obvious possible "next moves" for both OEMs do. Think about all these possibilities that could realistically be evaluated over the next decade or so:

- A320 rewing with a heavier wing, leaving the existing wing or a variant in place for lighter variants
- A350 stretch + maybe wing extension to neutralize 777X capacity advantage and leverage A350 weight advantage
- 787 heavier center wing box + new main gear + wing extension to take the 787 into 777X replacement territory
- A220 stretch + heavier main gear

All of these would cover markets that the OEMs are currently missing or will be missing in the near future, for far less money than all-new frames. Boeing's key strategic issue that it's working through is that it cannot address the A321 in this sort of way.


I will say right here that the day Airbus stretches the A220 and looks to be pushing the A320neo out of that market for it to position it as an A321/22 I sell my shares in Airbus and possibly even short the stock. I may be wrong but splitting the baby seems like an awful idea to me that far too many here readily endorse without really thinking it thru.
 
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Feb 26, 2019 7:30 pm

par13del wrote:
bigjku wrote:
1. The 737 is expensive to produce and Boeing wants to eventually replace it with planes designed for modern, automatedmass production. You have to start somewhere and NMA will be where they start.

Does make you wonder why they did not stick to their guns and do the NSA when they wanted to, they had to know then how expensive it was to produce and whether they could simply lower the cost by just squeezing the vendors, can't blame everything on the NEO catching them off guard.

The customers forced their hand. They said that they would not wait for the NSA; they would rather have the MAX (which they were willing to wait for) now.
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jeffrey0032j
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Wed Feb 27, 2019 1:00 am

mjoelnir wrote:
bikerthai wrote:
par13del wrote:
So let's think about this some more, spend 10 billion on a new frame for which they do not have RLI, or lower the profitability of the 737-900ER / MAX-10 / MAX200 to regain some market share?


I'm not sure if that is the current consensus now at Boeing as it have been stated that Boeing will not sell plane for a loss just to gain market share. This was back when Airbus had the title of number one airplane manufacturer. Even now, I believe Boeing is O.K. with the A320 outselling the A737 if by a small margin as long as they maintain dominance in the wide body market (where the profit is). This is not going to change with the addition of the 797 and the emergence of COMAC narrow body.

bt


The narrow body frames, both at Boeing and Airbus are the cash cows, the main provider of profits.

They are cash cows, but only because of volume. You'll get higher margins on widebody sales.
 
mzlin
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Thu Feb 28, 2019 9:08 am

Rolls Royce has dropped out of the engine competition for the NMA/797. I believe Stitch predicted it.

"Rolls-Royce also said it would withdraw from a competition to power a new plane Boeing may build. The timelines to complete development of its engine and Boeing’s plans to introduce the so-called New Midsize Airplane around 2025 don’t match up, Rolls-Royce Chief Executive Warren East said Thursday, calling the move “a very difficult decision.”"

Reported by WSJ in their article about today's order by BA for 18x 777-9s:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/boeing-lan ... counts-wsj
 
pabloeing
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Thu Feb 28, 2019 9:35 am

Fantastic for GE ¡¡¡¡
 
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Thu Feb 28, 2019 7:47 pm

Jon O / The Air Current ( https://theaircurrent.com/engine-develo ... gine-pick/ ) suggests the RR drop out may mean that the NMA engine winner annoncement may be fast approaching.

His twitter ( https://twitter.com/jonostrower/status/ ... 9782355969 ) says:

Rolls-Royce’s own internal target since at least late 2018 had assumed its engine offering for Boeing’s 797 wouldn’t have been ready until 2027.

which to me at least suggests Boeing wasn't OK with a delayed (post-2025) time line.
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 1:44 pm

bigjku wrote:
They didn’t know if building planes that way would work. Since then I think they have decided what parts of the 787 process to keep, what to bring internal (wings clearly on that list) and how they want to apply it.

It's funny when you step back and take in the big picture after reading various partisan posts.

They suggest there is a genuine fear that Boeing will pull off what the aviation media is suggesting they probably will do, create an all-new light wide body for the middle of the market that has great operational economics and attractive purchase price, largely based on technology flowing down from 787 and 777x, with a low technology risk engine with high reliability and efficiency, and able to open new city pairs due to its payload, range and economics. In the process, Boeing will be putting in to place new design and manufacturing methodologies and changing its relationship with its supply chain, establishing for itself a new level of profitability and positioning itself to make an all new narrow body as a follow up.

I guess this can generate a lot of fear in some people's minds.

The fear might also come from fact that they keep proposing all different permutations of new wings and new wing boxes and stretches yet they are hearing next to nothing in the aviation media from Airbus, other than hints of the turmoil in the decision making process as the guard changes from Enders to Faury while a corruption investigation continues in the background.

It's nice to be able to just sit back and watch events unfold instead of having to continuously generate pot stirring theories and photoshopped photos of overstretched aircraft.
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Newbiepilot
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 2:09 pm

Revelation wrote:
bigjku wrote:
They didn’t know if building planes that way would work. Since then I think they have decided what parts of the 787 process to keep, what to bring internal (wings clearly on that list) and how they want to apply it.

It's funny when you step back and take in the big picture after reading various partisan posts.

They suggest there is a genuine fear that Boeing will pull off what the aviation media is suggesting they probably will do, create an all-new light wide body for the middle of the market that has great operational economics and attractive purchase price, largely based on technology flowing down from 787 and 777x, with a low technology risk engine with high reliability and efficiency, and able to open new city pairs due to its payload, range and economics. In the process, Boeing will be putting in to place new design and manufacturing methodologies and changing its relationship with its supply chain, establishing for itself a new level of profitability and positioning itself to make an all new narrow body as a follow up.

I guess this can generate a lot of fear in some people's minds.

The fear might also come from fact that they keep proposing all different permutations of new wings and new wing boxes and stretches yet they are hearing next to nothing in the aviation media from Airbus, other than hints of the turmoil in the decision making process as the guard changes from Enders to Faury while a corruption investigation continues in the background.

It's nice to be able to just sit back and watch events unfold instead of having to continuously generate pot stirring theories and photoshopped photos of overstretched aircraft.


Airbus is going to have to market against the NMA. They may have the fear you are referring to. The sales strategies are appearing

  • The NMA can’t fly cargo, so buy the A330neo
  • Single aisle airplanes are better, so buy the A321
  • The technology doesn’t exist for the NMA to be a good plane
  • The A321 is will be around a long time and has potential to grow, so don’t swap
  • Everyone flies the A321, so jump on the bandwagon
  • The A321 payload can keep going up. Ignore the consequences from the wingloading, engine thrust increases and weigh and balance
  • No one can build a plane on time, so assume Boeing will fail and be late
  • The PW engine will be fixed by the time the NMA is around. Geared fans are better

All the airlines expressing interest in the NMA probably does create some fear that the NMA will be a success
Last edited by Newbiepilot on Mon Mar 04, 2019 2:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 2:20 pm

Newbiepilot wrote:
Airbus is going to have to market against the NMA. They may have the fear you are referring to. The sales strategies are appearing

  • The NMA can’t fly cargo, so buy the A330neo
  • Single aisle airplanes are better, so buy the A321
  • The technology doesn’t exist for the NMA to be a good plane
  • The A321 is will be around a long time and has potential to grow, so don’t swap
  • Everyone flies the A321, so jump on the bandwagon
  • No one can build a plane on time, so assume Boeing will fail and be late
  • The PW engine will be fixed by the time the NMA is around

All the airlines expressing interest in the NMA probably does create some fear that the NMA will be a success

You forgot:

  • No gear = No good

But maybe don't say it too loud till you're sure PW doesn't find its way on to the NMA.

Newbiepilot wrote:
All the airlines expressing interest in the NMA probably does create some fear that the NMA will be a success

It's hard to avoid reaching this conclusion, seeing how much denial their is around what the airlines are saying they want.

Some are so fearful of reality that they are referring to A321 as a new medium airplane when it is a 1980s old medium airplane.
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Kindanew
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 2:35 pm

Leeham News continues to be highly sceptical that a launch will come any time soon.
https://leehamnews.com/2019/03/04/ponti ... ma-launch/
 
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 3:46 pm

Kindanew wrote:
Leeham News continues to be highly sceptical that a launch will come any time soon.
https://leehamnews.com/2019/03/04/ponti ... ma-launch/


i think with ATO coming soon, the initial demand from airlines will make or break the program. if they can get a few hundred orders before launch they'll go ahead i think.
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 3:59 pm

musman9853 wrote:
Kindanew wrote:
Leeham News continues to be highly sceptical that a launch will come any time soon.
https://leehamnews.com/2019/03/04/ponti ... ma-launch/


i think with ATO coming soon, the initial demand from airlines will make or break the program. if they can get a few hundred orders before launch they'll go ahead i think.

I see the demand. Airlines are discussing. There is an obvious Gap in the market. The only question is the business case as this plane will compete in a new area for widebodies.

Leeham is always skeptical on Boeing and was overly enthusiastic on the A346, A388, and A338/9. Meh... The site has good information, I just draw different conclusions.

The engine will be key:

Pratt: 3.5:1 gearbox, better low turbine. Probably first GTF with 4 low turbine stages (greater bypass ratio).
Probably add in the fan nozzle (missions are long enough).

CFM:. CMC inlet vanes on the turbine. Already shown an ability to put in an insane number of low turbine stages. Unlikely to be GTF ready. But still a contender. They will bid a lower cost than Pratt.

At this time I cannot pick an engine as I do not have access to the bid details.

The chance for Pratt goes up if RR partners...

We find out if ATO goes forward within the next 90 days.

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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 4:07 pm

Depending upon how much of the R and D (including new manufacturing systems) of the 797 are directly transferrable to the NSA the price of the NMA may be a few tens of millions cheaper that customary accounting might have it. One learning I suspect Boeing is demanding from the 797 is rapid build up of production. The 797 will be fast, the NSA will sprint to ten a month - (by the end of the first year?)
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 4:14 pm

frmrCapCadet wrote:
Depending upon how much of the R and D (including new manufacturing systems) of the 797 are directly transferrable to the NSA the price of the NMA may be a few tens of millions cheaper that customary accounting might have it. One learning I suspect Boeing is demanding from the 797 is rapid build up of production. The 797 will be fast, the NSA will sprint to ten a month - (by the end of the first year?)


Yeah, everyone wants to ignore the impact you hve on NSA by doing some of the systems here. Even if they are derivatives it’s a lot easier to get to rate quickly with things you already make or are similar to things you make.

The NSA rate spin up will be (for both builders) the biggest industrial and development challenge ever managed. IMHO the second one is announced orders for he previous model dry up and people are screaming to convert. Ideally you need to go from announces to in service in 4 years. You need to be in high rate production in 6. That is a huge challenge.
 
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 4:27 pm

lightsaber wrote:


Leeham is always skeptical on Boeing and was overly enthusiastic on the A346, A388, and A338/9. Meh... The site has good information, I just draw different conclusions.

Lightsaber


To be fair, he simply referred to the doubts raised by people from the industry, that wasn’t simply his opinion. Some analysts can be biased for sure though.

But if it is true that even engine manufacturers don’t see a business case unless they become they the sole suppliers, then this might raise some eyebrows to say the least.
 
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 4:42 pm

lightsaber wrote:
musman9853 wrote:
Kindanew wrote:
Leeham News continues to be highly sceptical that a launch will come any time soon.
https://leehamnews.com/2019/03/04/ponti ... ma-launch/


i think with ATO coming soon, the initial demand from airlines will make or break the program. if they can get a few hundred orders before launch they'll go ahead i think.

I see the demand. Airlines are discussing. There is an obvious Gap in the market. The only question is the business case as this plane will compete in a new area for widebodies.

Leeham is always skeptical on Boeing and was overly enthusiastic on the A346, A388, and A338/9. Meh... The site has good information, I just draw different conclusions.

The engine will be key:

Pratt: 3.5:1 gearbox, better low turbine. Probably first GTF with 4 low turbine stages (greater bypass ratio).
Probably add in the fan nozzle (missions are long enough).

CFM:. CMC inlet vanes on the turbine. Already shown an ability to put in an insane number of low turbine stages. Unlikely to be GTF ready. But still a contender. They will bid a lower cost than Pratt.

At this time I cannot pick an engine as I do not have access to the bid details.

The chance for Pratt goes up if RR partners...

We find out if ATO goes forward within the next 90 days.

Lightsaber


There was obviously a gap in the market for the A380 but in hindsight the gap wasn't large enough to justify it's development.

I just find it strange how so many people on here are convinced the NMA will definitely the greatest success when people who's job it is to work these things out aren't convinced. The Leeham article claims that Boeing can't make the NMA as cheaply as airlines want and that the engine makers don't see a huge market for it. Plus they have been talking about this for 7 years.Airbus launched the A350 twice during that time.

Personally I think Boeing will launch the NMA but it will be of niche interest. It might sell 300-400 in the first year or two then the orders will trail off.
 
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 4:52 pm

Kindanew wrote:

There was obviously a gap in the market for the A380 but in hindsight the gap wasn't large enough to justify it's development.



Well to be fair, the A380 was created in a "niche" that had never been tried before. Nobody really knew how many routes would be viable for a 600-seat plane.

Whereas, a modern plane sized 250 seats will hit certain spots, as such routes exist today already. Not to mention, similarly sized 757 and 767 are still flying, so there must be something there if it works even with "outdated" technology.
 
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seahawk
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 5:04 pm

If it is a niche product, then economies of scale mean that it can not hit the desired price point. It is either go big (serious volume) or go home.
 
JayinKitsap
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 5:10 pm

bigjku wrote:
frmrCapCadet wrote:
Depending upon how much of the R and D (including new manufacturing systems) of the 797 are directly transferrable to the NSA the price of the NMA may be a few tens of millions cheaper that customary accounting might have it. One learning I suspect Boeing is demanding from the 797 is rapid build up of production. The 797 will be fast, the NSA will sprint to ten a month - (by the end of the first year?)


Yeah, everyone wants to ignore the impact you hve on NSA by doing some of the systems here. Even if they are derivatives it’s a lot easier to get to rate quickly with things you already make or are similar to things you make.

The NSA rate spin up will be (for both builders) the biggest industrial and development challenge ever managed. IMHO the second one is announced orders for he previous model dry up and people are screaming to convert. Ideally you need to go from announces to in service in 4 years. You need to be in high rate production in 6. That is a huge challenge.


By offering new models above the 737 current capabilities is the best way to transition, in particular if the NMA is sold sufficiently to sell at rate 20.

Yes the size of the components are different between the NMA and NSA. But actuators can have different force and stroke, but the NMA version is basically a stretch of the NSA version. All the controls stay the same in both. Repeat 1,000 times. The air packs could be the same, 4 on the NMA and 3 on the NSA. Use the same software and architecture throughout. But the NMA would give a good dress rehearsal, a chance to change items a bit for the new size to improve them onto the NSA.

Digital design, 3D printing, barrels with the ribs installed, every part designed for full on automation. Designed with elegant simplicity and redundancy. The 787 has now provided thru 800 copies to get CFRP experience and learning curve improvements.

It is time for ATO, I see Airbus constrained by the 380 demise and the changing of the guard. Airbus's initial response would likely be an A322 or similar with a new wing, but that locks them longer in the existing architecture of the A320, sort of a dead end. Similar to Boeing with the MAX introduction, it locked an added decade of 737 production, but it was the only available option as it would be 5 extra years to go NSA then, besides the lessons learned on the 787 were not fully there yet.
 
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 5:19 pm

Eyad89 wrote:
lightsaber wrote:


Leeham is always skeptical on Boeing and was overly enthusiastic on the A346, A388, and A338/9. Meh... The site has good information, I just draw different conclusions.

Lightsaber


To be fair, he simply referred to the doubts raised by people from the industry, that wasn’t simply his opinion. Some analysts can be biased for sure though.

But if it is true that even engine manufacturers don’t see a business case unless they become they the sole suppliers, then this might raise some eyebrows to say the least.


It could be the case of suppliers finding them outside of the business case. For example, for RR is it better for them if the NMA launches without them or never comes to pass. Honeywell and Collins may be on the outside looking in too, is it better for them then that the NMA not proceed?
 
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 6:38 pm

Well, the NMA is essentially the 767 with better economics. The 767 sold quite well until the A330 came along and ate its lunch. So the question is can a 7-abreast airliner still compete with an 8-abreast from above (A330neo) or 6-abreast from below (A321neo, A322) and win? It is a difficult proposition, as the 7-abreast is a fundamentally inefficient layout, and there are no tweaks that can change that. Whatever magic Boeing can find to make it work can also be applied to a competitor, either from above or below.
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monomojo
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 7:04 pm

SEPilot wrote:
Well, the NMA is essentially the 767 with better economics. The 767 sold quite well until the A330 came along and ate its lunch. So the question is can a 7-abreast airliner still compete with an 8-abreast from above (A330neo) or 6-abreast from below (A321neo, A322) and win? It is a difficult proposition, as the 7-abreast is a fundamentally inefficient layout, and there are no tweaks that can change that. Whatever magic Boeing can find to make it work can also be applied to a competitor, either from above or below.


Which is why it won't be a 7ab, but a "7.5". It will fly 8ab on short high-density routes, and do it at a massive efficiency advantage over either the A330NEO or A320NEO, and offer wide 7ab for premium fares and long-haul configurations, with much better pax comfort and payloads/ranges single aisles can't match.
 
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 8:04 pm

SEPilot wrote:
Whatever magic Boeing can find to make it work can also be applied to a competitor, either from above or below.


The magic is reducing the cost of fabrication through proprietary manufacturing process. Because it is proprietary, it can not be duplicated from above or below without getting into legal troubles.

The more I hear about the implementation of this process within Boeing, the more confident I am that they can get this right an drive down the cost of the 797. Enough to make it competitive with the current narrow body? Shrug . . . they say they may be close . . . time will tell.

bt
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lightsaber
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 8:13 pm

bikerthai wrote:
SEPilot wrote:
Whatever magic Boeing can find to make it work can also be applied to a competitor, either from above or below.


The magic is reducing the cost of fabrication through proprietary manufacturing process. Because it is proprietary, it can not be duplicated from above or below without getting into legal troubles.

The more I hear about the implementation of this process within Boeing, the more confident I am that they can get this right an drive down the cost of the 797. Enough to make it competitive with the current narrow body? Shrug . . . they say they may be close . . . time will tell.

bt

I'm curious as to the manufacturing process. I'm aware with what is happening with engines and certain vendors. Boeing definitely is stretching to get under a certain cost while still arriving at a business case.

It is an efficient cross section for a limited, cargo light market. It is a more efficient than the 767 cross section. Enough to fend off a very efficient 8-across? Well, side by side LD3 packages best with 9-across, so I now see a gap, cargo or no cargo 7 to 9 across in Y.

Cheap enough? Let us see.

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bigjku
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 8:24 pm

lightsaber wrote:
bikerthai wrote:
SEPilot wrote:
Whatever magic Boeing can find to make it work can also be applied to a competitor, either from above or below.


The magic is reducing the cost of fabrication through proprietary manufacturing process. Because it is proprietary, it can not be duplicated from above or below without getting into legal troubles.

The more I hear about the implementation of this process within Boeing, the more confident I am that they can get this right an drive down the cost of the 797. Enough to make it competitive with the current narrow body? Shrug . . . they say they may be close . . . time will tell.

bt

I'm curious as to the manufacturing process. I'm aware with what is happening with engines and certain vendors. Boeing definitely is stretching to get under a certain cost while still arriving at a business case.

It is an efficient cross section for a limited, cargo light market. It is a more efficient than the 767 cross section. Enough to fend off a very efficient 8-across? Well, side by side LD3 packages best with 9-across, so I now see a gap, cargo or no cargo 7 to 9 across in Y.

Cheap enough? Let us see.

Lightsaber


You clearly attack the 8 across with the 9 from above and the 7 from below. The A330 in its prime dealt with 9/10 across 777 that wasn’t great at 9 wide and a 7 across 767. The existence of the 787 makes life tough for an 8 across airplane I would think.

Ideally I would want a lineup (presuming I can’t find a way to do 4x4 in Y) that is 6 across, 7 with a very tight 8 across, 8/9 across and a 10/11 across. As an airline I would like to be able to segment my product with Y and Y+. The best way to do that in my view is the 787 approach. My Y tight but defensible for legacy carriers and Y+ you lose one seat without giving away the farm as far as space. It matters less the wider you get as that one seat only buys you so much extra space.

Anyway, long story short the gap between NMA would be very tight cross section wise to the 787 I would think. You could build a pure 8 across but it’s going to be bracketed.
 
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 8:46 pm

bikerthai wrote:
SEPilot wrote:
Whatever magic Boeing can find to make it work can also be applied to a competitor, either from above or below.


The magic is reducing the cost of fabrication through proprietary manufacturing process. Because it is proprietary, it can not be duplicated from above or below without getting into legal troubles.

The more I hear about the implementation of this process within Boeing, the more confident I am that they can get this right an drive down the cost of the 797. Enough to make it competitive with the current narrow body? Shrug . . . they say they may be close . . . time will tell.

bt

Purchase price only gets you so far. The operating economics have to be competitive as well. And while the oval 7-abreast is better than the 767 cross section, it is still worse than 6-abreast, and will be heavier as well, even with CFRP construction, as some structure will be needed to keep the oval shape that is not needed with a round or double-bubble cross section.
The problem with making things foolproof is that fools are so doggone ingenious...Dan Keebler
 
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 8:49 pm

Bathrooms right now just fit behind 3 seats, so do not fit well on the sides of a narrow double aisle. However doing an arrangement where it is single aisle premium economy ahead of the exit doors allows for side bathrooms slightly larger than currently. Makes the seats 2" wider along with a wider aisle ahead. Does it gain enough revenue by people upgrading at check in "Enjoy Premium for this leg - $50", a $ 100 extra per round trip to offset the costs.

It could be 7ab in the rear with the same seat width of the 737, that is only 16" wider than the 737 for the aisle.
 
morrisond
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 9:04 pm

SEPilot wrote:
bikerthai wrote:
SEPilot wrote:
Whatever magic Boeing can find to make it work can also be applied to a competitor, either from above or below.


The magic is reducing the cost of fabrication through proprietary manufacturing process. Because it is proprietary, it can not be duplicated from above or below without getting into legal troubles.

The more I hear about the implementation of this process within Boeing, the more confident I am that they can get this right an drive down the cost of the 797. Enough to make it competitive with the current narrow body? Shrug . . . they say they may be close . . . time will tell.

bt

Purchase price only gets you so far. The operating economics have to be competitive as well. And while the oval 7-abreast is better than the 767 cross section, it is still worse than 6-abreast, and will be heavier as well, even with CFRP construction, as some structure will be needed to keep the oval shape that is not needed with a round or double-bubble cross section.


Don't assume the economics are worse. If the oval is only 170"H by 188"W - that is a cross section only 25% more than an A320 (which is 163"H x 156"W) - for 16.7% more Y seats and up to 50% more premium seats and a container that could hold 50% more as well. The A320 has 10% more cross section area than 737 and it doesn't see to hurt it that much. BTW a 767 has a cross section 65.8% more than A320 at 213"H x 198"W, it's a lot bigger than what a tight Oval 7W could be.

An NMA at A321 length will have a lot more seats (20-30) or for the same seating the NMA could be substantially shorter. The weights could potentially not be that different on a per seat basis.

The operating economics may not be that bad if they go with a tight light oval. You can't make a broad generalization that 6W is better - it may be it may not be.
 
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 11:28 pm

SEPilot wrote:
The operating economics have to be competitive as well.


Exactly. While there are no numbers that we can get our hands on of yet, one of the benefit of a double aisle aircraft is to allow faster boarding and de-boarding thus increasing the utilization of the aircrafts. How many more flights can you squeeze in? Shrug . . .

bt
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Mon Mar 04, 2019 11:56 pm

bikerthai wrote:
SEPilot wrote:
The operating economics have to be competitive as well.


Exactly. While there are no numbers that we can get our hands on of yet, one of the benefit of a double aisle aircraft is to allow faster boarding and de-boarding thus increasing the utilization of the aircrafts. How many more flights can you squeeze in? Shrug . . .

bt

That is certainly one factor, as 7- abreast haa the fewest seats per aisle, and hence will have the fastest turnaround times of any common configuration. But that is important only on very short routes, where the plane makes multiple stops per day. And that is not the market that NMA is targeting.
The problem with making things foolproof is that fools are so doggone ingenious...Dan Keebler
 
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Mar 05, 2019 12:01 am

SEPilot wrote:
That is certainly one factor, as 7- abreast haa the fewest seats per aisle, and hence will have the fastest turnaround times of any common configuration. But that is important only on very short routes, where the plane makes multiple stops per day. And that is not the market that NMA is targeting.


We'll see. If NMA comes in two variants as has been widely speculated, I could imagine quite a few copies of the larger one spending their lives flying 2-hour missions in Europe and the Far East. It's about time for a new Kontschaufel -- the A300 got too expensive to fly compared with the A321/739, but nothing quite does what it did for airlines like LH, TG, and even AA.
 
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flee
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Mar 05, 2019 5:43 am

I am not sure if having twin aisles actually speeds up the exit process. The bottleneck is the number of doors used for the process - if a twin aisle aircraft use only one door, the throughput will be the same as a single aisle aircraft.
 
mzlin
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Mar 05, 2019 5:56 am

flee wrote:
I am not sure if having twin aisles actually speeds up the exit process. The bottleneck is the number of doors used for the process - if a twin aisle aircraft use only one door, the throughput will be the same as a single aisle aircraft.


You apparently have never ridden in the back of a narrowbody before. The bottleneck is all 6 people each row getting their luggage from the overhead compartments. That's 6 sequential motions of getting up out of seat, picking up stuff around them, moving to aisle, reaching up, sideways, forward and back for suitcase, needing help with suitcase, putting it on ground, extending handle, placing other items on suitcase, moving down aisle, hopefully not dropping things or getting stuck halfway. Now repeat for each of 33 rows.

In a widebody say 9abreast, it's 4.5 passengers per aisle and when one is blocked the other can keep moving. In many widebody disembarkations, I cross over at some point to bypass someone blocking the aisle retrieving their items. And the door is so wide and efficient that by the time you get there it's often a full jog and the flight attendants are barely a blur in your eye as you zip by.
 
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Re: Boeing 797 Thread - 2019

Tue Mar 05, 2019 9:49 am

The turnaround time won´t be much different. More seats mean more seats to clean, more food to restock, more trash to take out.

Sure a FR or U2 like operation could probably squeeze a few minutes out of the process, but I doubt they are seen as operators for the plane. And once you get premium class seats and catering in the plane, restocking and cleaning those alone will eat up any advantage.

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