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aemoreira1981
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Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 3:07 am

Between 1965 and 1982, 976 DC-9s in these variants were built, totaling:

    137 DC-9-10 (all variants)
    10 DC-9-20
    662 DC-9-30 series (all variants)
    71 DC-9-40 series
    96 DC-9-50 series

No DC-9-20s (all ordered by SK) are in service and only 4 still exist.
    2 in derelict condition at CCS, last flown by Aeropostal.
    1 stored by Thales since being retired from being a testbed in 2010
    1 stored by Skydiving Perris at L65

No DC-9-40s or 50s in service either.
    The last operator of the DC-9-40 was Delta Air Lines, with frames inherited from Northwest Airlines that had flown since the 1960s; NW was in the process of phasing out that model when acquired by DL. The only DC-9-40 known to still exist is being used as a source for parts by 5V in Alaska.
    The last operator of the DC-9-50 was either Delta or Aeropostal (DL operated the DC-9-50 into early 2014). There is one DC-9-50 properly preserved, N675MC, at the Delta Flight Museum next to ATL, and one used as a fire training plane in Minnesota. Besides the preserved frame at ATL and the stored one at TVF, there are 18 DC-9-50s in derelict condition in Africa, Iran, and the CIS; the remainder are scrapped.

All remaining frames in service are from the -10 and -30 series, and by country (here, I'll use the ICAO code):

Mexico: 9 (+ 1 due)
    VTM: 3 DC-9-10 (+ 1 due), 6 DC-9-30 (+ 2 stored, likely used for parts)

United States: 18
    AJI: 4 DC-9-10
    JUS: 3 DC-9-10, 3 DC-9-30
    KII: 2 DC-9-10, 1 DC-9-30
    RTN: 1 DC-9-30
    SKZ: 1 DC-9-10
    US Government (includes the final DC-9 ever built): 3 DC-9-30 (+ 1 stored)

There is also an additional DC-9-10 that is owned by Glenn Beck whose registration expired at the end of 2018, that he put up for sale in spring 2018.

Kenya: 8
    EXZ/FFV: 2 DC-9-10 (+ 1 stored, likely used for parts)
    AXK: 1 DC-9-30
    ACF: 2 DC-9-30
    VTS: 3 DC-9-30 (+ 1 stored, likely used for parts; there is also a DC-9-40 that is likely used for parts)

South Africa: 2
    GBB: 1 DC-9-30
    PHB: 1 DC-9-30 (+ 1 stored)

Many others did fly all around the world, but are all retired now and scrapped or derelict, including a bunch in Venezuela (PAWA also operated the DC-9 until it went bankrupt). However, for a frame that has such short range, it's interesting that 27 of the 37 remaining DC-9s in service are operating in North America still, including 18 of the 37 in the USA. However, compared to the Boeing 737, the DC-9 (pre-MD-80) has much fewer frames in service. Does Boeing still provide support for the DC-9 compared to the 737? Is the fact that the 737 isn't a T-tail plane also a contributing factor? Also, with respect to stretches, why were the -40 and -50 not as popular as the -30? (Range limitations?)
Last edited by aemoreira1981 on Thu Feb 21, 2019 3:12 am, edited 1 time in total.
 
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MD80
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 3:10 am

Thanks for your list of active DC-9s!
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 3:25 am

Quite informative, thanks for this.

I randomly caught USA Jet's DC-9-15 a few years back while taxing out at MYR. Had to do a double take when I saw her. Nice to know there are still a few left flying around.
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 4:07 am

If you want to see the majority of the last remaining flying DC-9s in North America (and 72S too), go out to YIP. (Willow Run about 10 miles west of DTW).

Basically they are all flying on-demand / expedited air freight for the auto industry, moving parts from suppliers into assembly plants. A lot go back and forth to Mexico.
 
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 5:36 am

I read about a South American carrier - think it was from Brazil - that operated regular scheduled passenger routes using DC-9s. That was a year ago though so they have probably been retired by now.
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arffguy
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 6:05 am

Last I knew there was DC-9-51 N699HA still in one piece at the Pacific Aerospace Training Center in Hawaii. Engineless but basically preserved. Is it still there?

It's cool that you track these planes.
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 6:10 am

N767NC is a -50 and at MSP.
 
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 6:18 am

 
BoeingGuy
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 6:19 am

Nice analysis. Did you say there is a DC-9 in Renton (RTN)?

Yes Boeing provides support for any in-service plane. I once saw a customer support issue for a DC-4.
 
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 6:22 am

Planespotters (not always accurate) shows around 90 737-200, mostly but not all Advanced models, still in service. Most of them are operating either for governments or into areas with difficult conditions, including unimproved runways. I expect that the 732's suitability for those specialized missions are why it still has more frames in service than the Diesel 9.

JT8D engine maintenance has gotten expensive, so not many operators are flying JT8D-powered aircraft anymore without a specific reason to do so. The current narrowbody of choice for the airline that can't swing current types is the CFM-powered 737 Classic, but that is already giving way to the A319ceo, with early A320ceos and 738s next up.
 
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 7:15 am

seabosdca wrote:
Planespotters (not always accurate) shows around 90 737-200, mostly but not all Advanced models, still in service. Most of them are operating either for governments or into areas with difficult conditions, including unimproved runways. I expect that the 732's suitability for those specialized missions are why it still has more frames in service than the Diesel 9.

JT8D engine maintenance has gotten expensive, so not many operators are flying JT8D-powered aircraft anymore without a specific reason to do so. The current narrowbody of choice for the airline that can't swing current types is the CFM-powered 737 Classic, but that is already giving way to the A319ceo, with early A320ceos and 738s next up.


Apparently some large chunk of the active 737-200s are flying in Canada to airports with unpaved runways. They're considered so irreplaceable that Nolinor Aviation got glass cockpits certified and installed on theirs.
 
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 11:02 am

zippy wrote:
seabosdca wrote:
Planespotters (not always accurate) shows around 90 737-200, mostly but not all Advanced models, still in service. Most of them are operating either for governments or into areas with difficult conditions, including unimproved runways. I expect that the 732's suitability for those specialized missions are why it still has more frames in service than the Diesel 9.

JT8D engine maintenance has gotten expensive, so not many operators are flying JT8D-powered aircraft anymore without a specific reason to do so. The current narrowbody of choice for the airline that can't swing current types is the CFM-powered 737 Classic, but that is already giving way to the A319ceo, with early A320ceos and 738s next up.


Apparently some large chunk of the active 737-200s are flying in Canada to airports with unpaved runways. They're considered so irreplaceable that Nolinor Aviation got glass cockpits certified and installed on theirs.


That's interesting, I wonder what the advantage is over a -500 or -600. Does the JT8D make that big a difference?
 
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 11:47 am

There is a delta DC9 in storage in Charlotte at the Carolina Aviation Museum.
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 11:52 am

deltadart106 wrote:
That's interesting, I wonder what the advantage is over a (737)-500 or -600. Does the JT8D make that big a difference?


Dear DeltaDart,

The JT8D used on the 737-200 has got a significantly smaller fan diameter than the CFM56 on the later generations. This increases the ground clearance to reduce the FOD ingestion risk. Add the gravel kit option on the -200 and you've got the perfect aircraft for this niche application.
But I think we disgress?

Kind regards,
Hendric
 
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aemoreira1981
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 2:25 pm

Wynnster8 wrote:
There is a delta DC9 in storage in Charlotte at the Carolina Aviation Museum.


WAS. There was a thread here when that plane was being parted out around Christmas 2016.

As for B732s in service, I did that a few weeks ago and it showed about 107 active with about 20 in bush environments in Canada and southern South America because of harsh climates.
 
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 2:39 pm

Wynnster8 wrote:
There is a delta DC9 in storage in Charlotte at the Carolina Aviation Museum.


That has been scrapped: viewtopic.php?t=1351179
 
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 6:20 pm

seabosdca wrote:
Planespotters (not always accurate) shows around 90 737-200, mostly but not all Advanced models, still in service. Most of them are operating either for governments or into areas with difficult conditions, including unimproved runways. I expect that the 732's suitability for those specialized missions are why it still has more frames in service than the Diesel 9.

JT8D engine maintenance has gotten expensive, so not many operators are flying JT8D-powered aircraft anymore without a specific reason to do so. The current narrowbody of choice for the airline that can't swing current types is the CFM-powered 737 Classic, but that is already giving way to the A319ceo, with early A320ceos and 738s next up.

The JT8D supply chain has almost been shutdown for 4 years. So I'm not shocked at the transition. Good condition used A319s became a bargain when Cebu Pacific and easyJet upgauged and released more A319s than the market wanted.

I think the 738 is a great plane. However, I believe WN's early 733 retirement and global scrounging for 73Gs and 738s boosted up their price for a few years (supply and demand a d Southwest soaked up the supply). So I expect a later transition for the NGs, but only delayed 2 or 3 years. I also believe the slow MAX ramp has reduced supply.

With NEO, MAX, and A220 production ramping, low utilization opperators will have a fine selection. Wait 3 years and we will watch an abrupt transition in the market. Supply and Demand will rebalance and, as always happens, the resale value of the prior generation takes a sharp decline.

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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 6:29 pm

There is one former DHL DC-9 on the ramp at ILN...been there for years but I have never been able to find anything out about it.
 
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 7:14 pm

aemoreira1981 wrote:
Between 1965 and 1982, 976 DC-9s in these variants were built, totaling:

    137 DC-9-10 (all variants)
    10 DC-9-20
    662 DC-9-30 series (all variants)
    71 DC-9-40 series
    96 DC-9-50 series

No DC-9-20s (all ordered by SK) are in service and only 4 still exist.
    2 in derelict condition at CCS, last flown by Aeropostal.
    1 stored by Thales since being retired from being a testbed in 2010
    1 stored by Skydiving Perris at L65

No DC-9-40s or 50s in service either.
    The last operator of the DC-9-40 was Delta Air Lines, with frames inherited from Northwest Airlines that had flown since the 1960s; NW was in the process of phasing out that model when acquired by DL. The only DC-9-40 known to still exist is being used as a source for parts by 5V in Alaska.
    The last operator of the DC-9-50 was either Delta or Aeropostal (DL operated the DC-9-50 into early 2014). There is one DC-9-50 properly preserved, N675MC, at the Delta Flight Museum next to ATL, and one used as a fire training plane in Minnesota. Besides the preserved frame at ATL and the stored one at TVF, there are 18 DC-9-50s in derelict condition in Africa, Iran, and the CIS; the remainder are scrapped.

All remaining frames in service are from the -10 and -30 series, and by country (here, I'll use the ICAO code):

Mexico: 9 (+ 1 due)
    VTM: 3 DC-9-10 (+ 1 due), 6 DC-9-30 (+ 2 stored, likely used for parts)

United States: 18
    AJI: 4 DC-9-10
    JUS: 3 DC-9-10, 3 DC-9-30
    KII: 2 DC-9-10, 1 DC-9-30
    RTN: 1 DC-9-30
    SKZ: 1 DC-9-10
    US Government (includes the final DC-9 ever built): 3 DC-9-30 (+ 1 stored)

There is also an additional DC-9-10 that is owned by Glenn Beck whose registration expired at the end of 2018, that he put up for sale in spring 2018.

Kenya: 8
    EXZ/FFV: 2 DC-9-10 (+ 1 stored, likely used for parts)
    AXK: 1 DC-9-30
    ACF: 2 DC-9-30
    VTS: 3 DC-9-30 (+ 1 stored, likely used for parts; there is also a DC-9-40 that is likely used for parts)

South Africa: 2
    GBB: 1 DC-9-30
    PHB: 1 DC-9-30 (+ 1 stored)

Many others did fly all around the world, but are all retired now and scrapped or derelict, including a bunch in Venezuela (PAWA also operated the DC-9 until it went bankrupt). However, for a frame that has such short range, it's interesting that 27 of the 37 remaining DC-9s in service are operating in North America still, including 18 of the 37 in the USA. However, compared to the Boeing 737, the DC-9 (pre-MD-80) has much fewer frames in service. Does Boeing still provide support for the DC-9 compared to the 737? Is the fact that the 737 isn't a T-tail plane also a contributing factor? Also, with respect to stretches, why were the -40 and -50 not as popular as the -30? (Range limitations?)

Thanks for putting this together. Do you reckon you’d be able to clarify all the abbreviations you’ve used, please?

V/F
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 7:26 pm

Good timing, as there is currently a USA Jet DC-9-33F sitting here on the cargo ramp at SEA right next to the FX ramp. I haven't seen a DC-9 in years.
 
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 7:32 pm

emuwarveteran wrote:
I read about a South American carrier - think it was from Brazil - that operated regular scheduled passenger routes using DC-9s. That was a year ago though so they have probably been retired by now.


It certainly wasn't Brazil, the only member of the DC-9 family to operate here was an MD-82 that flew with Cruzeiro for a few months.
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 7:33 pm

It's my understanding that the intention is to re-activate the Skydive Perris DC-9.
Hope to "DB Cooper" out of it one day!

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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 7:37 pm

But, of course, MD-80/MD-90, and even 717's have the same type certificate.
 
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 8:06 pm

VTS is Everts air cargo. Should be in the US. Column not Kenya
 
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 8:24 pm

HPRamper wrote:
Good timing, as there is currently a USA Jet DC-9-33F sitting here on the cargo ramp at SEA right next to the FX ramp. I haven't seen a DC-9 in years.


327US is a beautiful airplane, or was when I last flew it a few years ago. Picked it up out of the paint shop when it was done in 2015.
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Thu Feb 21, 2019 9:56 pm

texl1649 wrote:
But, of course, MD-80/MD-90, and even 717's have the same type certificate.

True, but not really the point of this discussion.

lightsaber wrote:
The JT8D supply chain has almost been shutdown for 4 years.


How much longer are the Canadian niche 732 operators going to be able to keep their JT8Ds going? There's only so many parts donors left.

Would it even be technically possible (never mind the cost) for them to hang a JT8D-200 series donated from an MD80 under the wing of a 732?
 
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aemoreira1981
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Fri Feb 22, 2019 1:18 am

VirginFlyer wrote:
aemoreira1981 wrote:
Between 1965 and 1982, 976 DC-9s in these variants were built, totaling:

    137 DC-9-10 (all variants)
    10 DC-9-20
    662 DC-9-30 series (all variants)
    71 DC-9-40 series
    96 DC-9-50 series

No DC-9-20s (all ordered by SK) are in service and only 4 still exist.
    2 in derelict condition at CCS, last flown by Aeropostal.
    1 stored by Thales since being retired from being a testbed in 2010
    1 stored by Skydiving Perris at L65

No DC-9-40s or 50s in service either.
    The last operator of the DC-9-40 was Delta Air Lines, with frames inherited from Northwest Airlines that had flown since the 1960s; NW was in the process of phasing out that model when acquired by DL. The only DC-9-40 known to still exist is being used as a source for parts by 5V in Alaska.
    The last operator of the DC-9-50 was either Delta or Aeropostal (DL operated the DC-9-50 into early 2014). There is one DC-9-50 properly preserved, N675MC, at the Delta Flight Museum next to ATL, and one used as a fire training plane in Minnesota. Besides the preserved frame at ATL and the stored one at TVF, there are 18 DC-9-50s in derelict condition in Africa, Iran, and the CIS; the remainder are scrapped.

All remaining frames in service are from the -10 and -30 series, and by country (here, I'll use the ICAO code):

Mexico: 9 (+ 1 due)
    VTM: 3 DC-9-10 (+ 1 due), 6 DC-9-30 (+ 2 stored, likely used for parts)

United States: 18
    AJI: 4 DC-9-10
    JUS: 3 DC-9-10, 3 DC-9-30
    KII: 2 DC-9-10, 1 DC-9-30
    RTN: 1 DC-9-30
    SKZ: 1 DC-9-10
    US Government (includes the final DC-9 ever built): 3 DC-9-30 (+ 1 stored)

There is also an additional DC-9-10 that is owned by Glenn Beck whose registration expired at the end of 2018, that he put up for sale in spring 2018.

Kenya: 8
    EXZ/FFV: 2 DC-9-10 (+ 1 stored, likely used for parts)
    AXK: 1 DC-9-30
    ACF: 2 DC-9-30
    VTS: 3 DC-9-30 (+ 1 stored, likely used for parts; there is also a DC-9-40 that is likely used for parts)

South Africa: 2
    GBB: 1 DC-9-30
    PHB: 1 DC-9-30 (+ 1 stored)

Many others did fly all around the world, but are all retired now and scrapped or derelict, including a bunch in Venezuela (PAWA also operated the DC-9 until it went bankrupt). However, for a frame that has such short range, it's interesting that 27 of the 37 remaining DC-9s in service are operating in North America still, including 18 of the 37 in the USA. However, compared to the Boeing 737, the DC-9 (pre-MD-80) has much fewer frames in service. Does Boeing still provide support for the DC-9 compared to the 737? Is the fact that the 737 isn't a T-tail plane also a contributing factor? Also, with respect to stretches, why were the -40 and -50 not as popular as the -30? (Range limitations?)

Thanks for putting this together. Do you reckon you’d be able to clarify all the abbreviations you’ve used, please?

V/F


ICAO codes (3-letter codes)...I would use the 2-letter code, but one operator in Mexico doesn't have an IATA code.
 
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Fri Feb 22, 2019 1:54 am

American Jet Charter's DC-9-10 N785TW is currently in flight.
https://flightaware.com/live/flight/AJI9351/history/20190222/0100Z/KBRO/KYIP

USA Jet Airlines DC-9-10 is currently in flight.
https://flightaware.com/live/flight/JUS196/history/20190222/0100Z/KYIP/KOKC
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Fri Feb 22, 2019 2:17 am

N112PS Sky Way Enterprises is still operational, no?
 
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aemoreira1981
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Fri Feb 22, 2019 2:35 am

Dazed767 wrote:
N112PS Sky Way Enterprises is still operational, no?


Yes and they're marked as SKZ above. Their frame was acquired when Kitty Hawk went bankrupt but before Connie Kalitta rescued that airline.

That said, what's the advantage of operating 50+-year old DC-9s? (Most if not all are owned by their operators.)
 
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Fri Feb 22, 2019 2:52 am

aemoreira1981 wrote:
Dazed767 wrote:
N112PS Sky Way Enterprises is still operational, no?


That said, what's the advantage of operating 50+-year old DC-9s? (Most if not all are owned by their operators.)


They are paid for and do the job they need to do.
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Dominion301
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Fri Feb 22, 2019 3:04 am

aemoreira1981 wrote:
Dazed767 wrote:
N112PS Sky Way Enterprises is still operational, no?


Yes and they're marked as SKZ above. Their frame was acquired when Kitty Hawk went bankrupt but before Connie Kalitta rescued that airline.

That said, what's the advantage of operating 50+-year old DC-9s? (Most if not all are owned by their operators.)


Probably the super cheap acquisition costs and the fact Douglas products were built like tanks. If you have a DC-9 with say 75k cycles and 85k hours on the airframe, at an ad-hoc low utilization rate, you have got a lot of life left in the airframe.
 
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Re: Remaining DC-9 operators (DC-9-14 to DC-9-51)

Fri Feb 22, 2019 11:33 am

aemoreira1981 wrote:
VirginFlyer wrote:
aemoreira1981 wrote:
Between 1965 and 1982, 976 DC-9s in these variants were built, totaling:

    137 DC-9-10 (all variants)
    10 DC-9-20
    662 DC-9-30 series (all variants)
    71 DC-9-40 series
    96 DC-9-50 series

No DC-9-20s (all ordered by SK) are in service and only 4 still exist.
    2 in derelict condition at CCS, last flown by Aeropostal.
    1 stored by Thales since being retired from being a testbed in 2010
    1 stored by Skydiving Perris at L65

No DC-9-40s or 50s in service either.
    The last operator of the DC-9-40 was Delta Air Lines, with frames inherited from Northwest Airlines that had flown since the 1960s; NW was in the process of phasing out that model when acquired by DL. The only DC-9-40 known to still exist is being used as a source for parts by 5V in Alaska.
    The last operator of the DC-9-50 was either Delta or Aeropostal (DL operated the DC-9-50 into early 2014). There is one DC-9-50 properly preserved, N675MC, at the Delta Flight Museum next to ATL, and one used as a fire training plane in Minnesota. Besides the preserved frame at ATL and the stored one at TVF, there are 18 DC-9-50s in derelict condition in Africa, Iran, and the CIS; the remainder are scrapped.

All remaining frames in service are from the -10 and -30 series, and by country (here, I'll use the ICAO code):

Mexico: 9 (+ 1 due)
    VTM: 3 DC-9-10 (+ 1 due), 6 DC-9-30 (+ 2 stored, likely used for parts)

United States: 18
    AJI: 4 DC-9-10
    JUS: 3 DC-9-10, 3 DC-9-30
    KII: 2 DC-9-10, 1 DC-9-30
    RTN: 1 DC-9-30
    SKZ: 1 DC-9-10
    US Government (includes the final DC-9 ever built): 3 DC-9-30 (+ 1 stored)

There is also an additional DC-9-10 that is owned by Glenn Beck whose registration expired at the end of 2018, that he put up for sale in spring 2018.

Kenya: 8
    EXZ/FFV: 2 DC-9-10 (+ 1 stored, likely used for parts)
    AXK: 1 DC-9-30
    ACF: 2 DC-9-30
    VTS: 3 DC-9-30 (+ 1 stored, likely used for parts; there is also a DC-9-40 that is likely used for parts)

South Africa: 2
    GBB: 1 DC-9-30
    PHB: 1 DC-9-30 (+ 1 stored)

Many others did fly all around the world, but are all retired now and scrapped or derelict, including a bunch in Venezuela (PAWA also operated the DC-9 until it went bankrupt). However, for a frame that has such short range, it's interesting that 27 of the 37 remaining DC-9s in service are operating in North America still, including 18 of the 37 in the USA. However, compared to the Boeing 737, the DC-9 (pre-MD-80) has much fewer frames in service. Does Boeing still provide support for the DC-9 compared to the 737? Is the fact that the 737 isn't a T-tail plane also a contributing factor? Also, with respect to stretches, why were the -40 and -50 not as popular as the -30? (Range limitations?)

Thanks for putting this together. Do you reckon you’d be able to clarify all the abbreviations you’ve used, please?

V/F


ICAO codes (3-letter codes)...I would use the 2-letter code, but one operator in Mexico doesn't have an IATA code.

Sorry I wasn’t clear - I was asking if you could state the names of the operators - I assume you would have this list, and it will save everyone a lot of time going to ICAO code databases.

V/F
It is not for him to pride himself who loveth his own country, but rather for him who loveth the whole world. The earth is but one country, and mankind its citizens. —Bahá'u'lláh

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