asdf
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 1:34 pm

DL747400 wrote:
... Is there not potentially a substantial amount of additional legal liability involved in making a conscious decision to continue operating the 737-MAX well after it was already widely known that the suspected cause of the crashes is unique to the 737-MAX?


not a lawer by my profession but had a life long to do in that field ....

i guess the risk for a airline still using the MAX under this circumstances now is incredibily high
there are only a few doing it now
and not shure about what the PR departments there think about

i guess boeing will be very grat€ful to them in a way or another
 
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BirdBrain
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 1:48 pm

marcelh wrote:
Finn350 wrote:
It seems that Boeing is adding multiple inputs to MCAS, thus preventing single-point-of-failure scenarios.

“To make a safe plane even safer” :scratchchin:


Apple has been saying you are holding it wrong, but we will give you a free case ... Oh wait.
Boeing has been saying you are flying it wrong, but we will give you a free update. :duck:
 
LDRA
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 1:52 pm

Does WN AA UA AC WS all have AoA display or AoA disagree indication options ordered on their aircraft. That helps in explain the decision
 
birdbrainz
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 1:54 pm

I'm very curious if there are any 737 MAX pilots on here who might be willing to comment about the aircraft, training, or procedures.

Of course, he or she would need to be mindful that posting anything like this could get you fired/disciplined by your employer.
A good landing is one you can walk away from. A great landing is if the aircraft can be flown again.
 
idude
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 1:55 pm

keesje wrote:
CNN created a world map of countries banning 737-8 planes over the last few days.

Image

Source: https://edition.cnn.com/2019/03/11/africa/max-8-operations-roundup-intl/index.html

I think if in an hour or so Canada does so, pressure on the FAA, US Government and Industry will further grow. At some point even the most Industry supportive politician doesn't want to look stubborn & putting safety second if not on US soil.


Australian Pilots come in defense of Boeing Max as safe and reliable.

https://www.airlineratings.com/news/vir ... e-737-max/
 
asdf
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 1:57 pm

LDRA wrote:
Does WN AA UA AC WS all have AoA display or AoA disagree indication options ordered on their aircraft. That helps in explain the decision


the AoA display is helpful
of course

but if MCAS fails you can only cut out the electrical trim
and then you have a plane in hands with no basic stability and pretty anormal flight behavour

a plane that would need its own type rating for piloting it ....
 
Amiga500
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 2:02 pm

idude wrote:
Australian Pilots come in defense of Boeing Max as safe and reliable.

https://www.airlineratings.com/news/vir ... e-737-max/


With events moving that quickly, I'm sure if asked, they'd say something else today.
 
bob75013
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 2:10 pm

LDRA wrote:
Does WN AA UA AC WS all have AoA display or AoA disagree indication options ordered on their aircraft. That helps in explain the decision


WN has installed is installing on the rest
 
AngMoh
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 2:10 pm

idude wrote:

Australian Pilots come in defense of Boeing Max as safe and reliable.



He did not say that. He said he states the 737 is safe and Virgin Australia training is of a high standard. And both are facts. What he implies between the lines is that by the time Virgin Australia receives its first 737Max (they have none today), all issues will be addressed and the max will be as safe as the NG. And that is also a perfectly reasonable statement and one which I agree with. But today the NG is safer than the max.
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PW100
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 2:11 pm

DL717 wrote:
All this finger pointing and no one wants to ask a simple question. Why the hell was a guy with 200 hours sitting in the right seat of a 737?

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/12/busi ... chool.html


Do you find it similarly worrying that the US Air Force is sending 200 hrs pilots in fast jets armed with live amo over populated areas in the US . . .
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Magog
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 2:13 pm

Smartwings is in the air from Ankara to Prague. (ESB-PRG)
 
aaexecplat
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 2:14 pm

WIederling wrote:
NYCVIE wrote:
Secondly, it's a bit off topic but Boeing already shot themselves in the foot because the Lion Air accident exposed that they did not adequately alert crews as to the intricacies of the MCAS on the new aircraft.

You see in others what you know about yourself.
The US as conjoinment of government and corporations has subverted most every designed to be neutral agency on a national and international level towards taking advantage on a path to attaining full spectrum dominance. ( same happens locally. subverting the neutral constitutional and legal frame work as a common working environment for taking partisan advantage. full spectrum warfare. there no longer is a "loyal opposition" around. )


THIS is so spot on. I don't work in aviation, but I do work in a highly regulated industry and I have a front row seat to how "regulation" works in that industry. Small- and mid-size companies are encumbered AT ALL TIMES by regulators who ask for every business transaction and every communication with clients and prospective clients. That data gets sifted until they find ten out of millions of items and then effectively blackmail firms by saying they will levy fine X unless the firm settles for Y for an infraction that is entirely made up (sometimes claiming standard business practices that have been viable, legal and widely practiced for over 100 years are all of a sudden not). If small players need help or guidance from regulators, they have to reach out to Washington where we have a new Junior case worker every few months who NEEDS to score wins to get promoted (read...they are generally not trying to help you).

In the meantime, LARGE firms have designated staff of the regulators sitting in their offices and they function as defacto employees of said large corporations. It goes without saying that when those regulators/agents get a request from the company that houses them, that the requests are often rubberstamped and even if they are not, enforcement is so lenient that incurring fines can often be a less expensive strategy than to not engage in certain business practices. If you ever went to an industry regulatory conference in Washington, it would be very obvious that EVERY high-level compliance officer of the large companies is a prior supervisor or executive of the industry regulator. So it is clear IMO that those folks are hired to buy influence in the agency they helped supervise before entering private industry.

But apart from the large corporations owning the regulators, the system also ensures that the large corporations can use the regulator to encumber smaller and more nimble players and new entrants from becoming big in the first place by tying them up in never-ending compliance challenges (and costs) to behaviors that the large corps engage in daily without the same repercussions. The game here in the US is rigged greatly if you work in a highly regulated industry.

It is through this lens that I look at the cozy relationship between Boeing and the FAA and it is not surprising to see that the revolving door between private and public life is finally causing problems for both.
 
SkyGrunt
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 2:49 pm

ELBOB wrote:
Blotto wrote:
How would you cross check a system with two sensors? You never know which one is faulty. Which basically only leaves you one choice: deactivate the system you think is necessary for a stable flight if the values disagree. One could argue Boeing should've done that from the start, most likely losing the common type rating.


Exactly, which leads to the question as to why a system with only two sensors was approved.

Possibly something to do with the FAA Organizational Designation Authorization appointee for handling the 737 Max certification which happened to be... Boeing. Yes, the FAA delegated the authority to certify the aircraft to its manufacturer.

The same crazy situation as with the 787, after which the FAA criticised Boeing for failing to investigate potential battery issues as part of the process. But then they did it again.


Woah that's a huge conflict of interest. Any chance you can provide a source for this?
 
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JohnKrist
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 2:50 pm

PW100 wrote:
DL717 wrote:
All this finger pointing and no one wants to ask a simple question. Why the hell was a guy with 200 hours sitting in the right seat of a 737?

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/12/busi ... chool.html


Do you find it similarly worrying that the US Air Force is sending 200 hrs pilots in fast jets armed with live amo over populated areas in the US . . .


Well it is very easy to gain hours if you are not ”behind the wheel” I guess, just like driving F1 simgames make you an experienced driver.
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Noshow
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 2:52 pm

Everybody needs to gain experience from collecting flight hours and to start one day. No problem with that. A young guy is fresh out of school fresh trained with the latest, most current knowledge, fresh checked out and certified to go and highly motivated. Paired with some experienced captain to form a team there is no gap left from my point of view.
 
MKIAZ
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 2:56 pm

Blotto wrote:
How would you cross check a system with two sensors? You never know which one is faulty. Which basically only leaves you one choice: deactivate the system you think is necessary for a stable flight if the values disagree. One could argue Boeing should've done that from the start, most likely losing the common type rating.


Assuming the sensor wasn't blocked the whole flight, you probably could by having the computer look at the past history of readings from that sensor and disregard the sensor with a large sudden change in readings and use the data from the sensor that is displaying readings within a normal profile.

The ultimate solution to this problem is probably adding a third sensor, seriously bulletproofing the MCAS code, and having significant pilot training on how to easily disable MCAS and how to do some basic flying with MCAS disabled.
 
Flightsimboy
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:00 pm

babastud wrote:
LAX772LR....Your out of control on this and flat out wrong. This plane needs to of been grounded before the Ethiopian crash. It's been known that this plane is a faulty design, it's flawed in it's engineering. Software patches and band aids are not the fix. The pilots know the deal, get with reality lives are at risk!


It is best to focus on the thread and further developments than beating yourself to death over a person's views.
LAX772LR - "Answer to goofy question:" in response to my question about the B737-MAX8 being grounded. 48 hours later all B737-MAX8 grounded worldwide. Go figure!!
 
cledaybuck
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:02 pm

scbriml wrote:
777Jet wrote:
Groundings which were announced well after some here were demanding a grounding... :roll:


What are you saying, posters here led to the 737MAX being grounded? :confused:

To a certain extent, that is true. Public pressure is what is grounding these planes. I mean, why was the EU ok with these planes flying on Monday, but decided Tuesday that they needed to be grounded? As far as I know, nothing has really been learned in that time. I'm not saying the decision is wrong, though.
As we celebrate mediocrity, all the boys upstairs want to see, how much you'll pay for what you used to get for free.
 
gloom
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:08 pm

asdf wrote:
and then you have a plane in hands with no basic stability and pretty anormal flight behavour


I wouldn't say it's abnormal, it's probably flyable etc.

The problem is - flight characteristics are probably noticeably different from what you've learnt, and what you expect. That's why I believe grounding is a good choice - even if Boeing is right, and it's lack of training. Sure, how many pilots trained Max with stability (and trim augmented systems) off? Anyone ever did that? That's a serious question, if I get the problem right.

Cheers,
Adam
 
mcdu
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:14 pm

PW100 wrote:
DL717 wrote:
All this finger pointing and no one wants to ask a simple question. Why the hell was a guy with 200 hours sitting in the right seat of a 737?

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/12/busi ... chool.html


Do you find it similarly worrying that the US Air Force is sending 200 hrs pilots in fast jets armed with live amo over populated areas in the US . . .


The training a Air Force pilot receives is much more in-depth and difficult than civilian training. The military will wash a pilot out at the least sign of issues. In the civilian world the pilot is usually paying for his own training and the training company doesn’t want a reputation for washing out candidates and they train you until you run out of money or they can pass you at the bare minimum. Do not confuse a 200 civil trained pilot with a 200 hour military trained pilot. It’s apples to oranges. I’m not saying a 200 hour civil pilot might be a great stick and rudder pilot and maybe a great pilot overall. But the training received is significantly different.
 
RogerMurdock
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:14 pm

Who Says The Boeing 737 MAX Is Safe? The U.S. Pilots Who Fly It

Three U.S. carriers – American, Southwest and United – continue to fly the 737 MAX, 72 planes in all. Now their pilot unions, which generally speak independently of the carriers, are saying publicly that they believe the plane is safe to fly and they have the proper training to do so.
 
asdf
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:16 pm

gloom wrote:
....Sure, how many pilots trained Max with stability (and trim augmented systems) off? Anyone ever did that? That's a serious question, if I get the problem right.


it is told that they did such test flights during developing the MAX
the results are confidential
but they decide to implement the MCAS because of the flight behavior
 
A320FlyGuy
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:24 pm

hongkongflyer wrote:
A320FlyGuy wrote:
hongkongflyer wrote:

You are comparing a modern model EIS in 2018 with models 55 years ago?
Many thing/ risk which was considered acceptable even 10~20 years ago no longer be the true in 2019.


If you had taken the time to read my post, you would have seen that I said:

It is easy to forget just how far we have come in a relatively short period of time. When you look at the first and second generation jet transport aircraft, their safety records were downright abysmal

My point was that 50 years ago, the 727 had 3 hull losses inside of 90 days and the fleet was never grounded - it was considered an acceptable loss. That type of thinking doesn’t hold water in 2019.


We are looking at the possible reasons for the crash, not only how many days in between.
Basically all 3 727 crash you mentioned were due to pilot error.
In addition, the UA227 one is short of runway during landing. UA389 and AA383 were happening during bad weather and lack of visibility and flow into terrain.

What about the crash of 737MAX?
Bad weather is not a contributing factors for both crash, and both crashed shortly after takeoff and most importantly,
both have similar flight pattern prior to the crash. Both crash are too similar to warrant a grounding for the safety of the public
before Boeing can prove at lease ET one is not related to the same and known problem of the Lion air's crash.

I am sure even 3 or more 737MAX crash in a row within a very short period with very different background of the accidents,
the regulators would not demand a grounding of the model.


You're totally missing my point, but whatever.
My other car is an A320-200
 
ELBOB
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:26 pm

SkyGrunt wrote:
Woah that's a huge conflict of interest. Any chance you can provide a source for this?


(name redacted)
737 MAX Lead Certification Engineer, Boeing
Leads team of engineers and FAA-appointed ODA Project Administrators and Authorized Representatives to certify new models of the 737 MAX type design ( 737-8, -9, -7, -8200, -10 )
Also appointed by the FAA as an ODA Project Administrator and Advisor for designees in the Renton-area.
 
WIederling
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:33 pm

cledaybuck wrote:
scbriml wrote:
777Jet wrote:
Groundings which were announced well after some here were demanding a grounding... :roll:


What are you saying, posters here led to the 737MAX being grounded? :confused:

To a certain extent, that is true. Public pressure is what is grounding these planes. I mean, why was the EU ok with these planes flying on Monday, but decided Tuesday that they needed to be grounded? As far as I know, nothing has really been learned in that time. I'm not saying the decision is wrong, though.


I suppose there were doubts brought up against certification of the MAX as is from Certs other than the FAA and in scope of the initial certification propagation.
These apparently were wiped away ( via mutual complimentary cert acceptance arrangements ) or pressured out of existence. Bad taste remained.
With two crash cases on hand those holdbacks were reenergized.
Keeping the "mutual cert" FAA <> EASA in mind the per country certs were send ahead.
Murphy is an optimist
 
jumbojet
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:35 pm

RogerMurdock wrote:
Who Says The Boeing 737 MAX Is Safe? The U.S. Pilots Who Fly It

Three U.S. carriers – American, Southwest and United – continue to fly the 737 MAX, 72 planes in all. Now their pilot unions, which generally speak independently of the carriers, are saying publicly that they believe the plane is safe to fly and they have the proper training to do so.


Same thing can happen to a AA, SW and UA max. Dont be so naïve as to think it cant. And if it happens say over NYC while one of these MAX just departed LGA or JFK, their will be absolute hell to pay. How many MAX crashes does it take to ground the fleet? Hopefully we dont find out.

Looks like its totally possible that DL, a large operator of 737's, didnt want the MAX due to this design flaw.

Norwegian Air I believe operates MAX across the Atlantic, has this affected them?
 
DALCE
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:42 pm

[url][/url]It seems that Copa has now also grounded their 737MAX'

That leaves only US and Canada.....

Sunwing however has also grounded their MAX'

Westjet
Air Canada
Southwest
United
American

and oddly.....

Thai LionAir

are still active.
Last edited by DALCE on Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RogerMurdock
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:42 pm

jumbojet wrote:
Same thing can happen to a AA, SW and UA max.


Please be precise with what you mean by "same thing". PK-LQP (JT610) would not have been considered airworthy in the US. That closes that hole in the cheese.

Can you tell me exactly what happened on ET302 to assert the "same thing" can happen to an AA/WN/UA MAX?
 
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longhauler
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:44 pm

LDRA wrote:
Does WN AA UA AC WS all have AoA display or AoA disagree indication options ordered on their aircraft. That helps in explain the decision

Air Canada's do.
Just because I stopped arguing, doesn't mean I think you are right. It just means I gave up!
 
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ACCS300
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:49 pm

Breaking : Canada grounds the 737 MAX8 live on CBC News Network now
 
Dominion301
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:50 pm

Link to Minister Garneau speaking live regarding grounding of all MAXes in Canadian airspace: https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/garnea ... -1.5054234

Now it's just the US.
 
SkyGrunt
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:51 pm

It's official. Canada bans all flights in Canadian airspace for MAX 8 aircraft. I'll link it when I can

Sent from my BBD100-2 using Tapatalk
 
Andy33
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:53 pm

jumbojet wrote:
RogerMurdock wrote:
Who Says The Boeing 737 MAX Is Safe? The U.S. Pilots Who Fly It

Norwegian Air I believe operates MAX across the Atlantic, has this affected them?

Sure did. They voluntarily grounded their MAX fleet yesterday. In any case all the countries at the European end have banned MAX operations carrying passengers, either individually or later via the EASA blanket ban.
Norwegian continues to fly transatlantic with 787s, and within Europe with 738s. In the past they've sent 738s transatlantic but with quite a lot of seats blocked.
 
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BlueSky1976
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:54 pm

Boeing's lobbyists are hard at work to ensure FAA doesn't follow - knowing how the things work in good 'ole USA.
Tarriffs are taxes. Taxation is theft. You are not entitled to anything.
If it's a Boeing, I'm not going.
 
LetsGoOutside
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:55 pm

Canada has just prohibited further flights with MAX 8 and MAX 9 in Canadian airspace. Says they got new data today justifying decision. Data was not available until this morning says Canadian minister, who says data shows similitudes with Lion Air, therefore justifying ban. Data relates to vertical speed, which indicates (without being 100% conclusive) that worrysome issue is likely.
Last edited by LetsGoOutside on Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:59 pm, edited 2 times in total.
 
SkyGrunt
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:56 pm

SkyGrunt wrote:
It's official. Canada bans all flights in Canadian airspace for MAX 8 aircraft. I'll link it when I can

Sent from my BBD100-2 using Tapatalk
MAX 9 as well.

Sent from my BBD100-2 using Tapatalk
 
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keesje
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:58 pm

American, Southwest, United Airlines can no longer fly on Canadian destinations.

Satelite data seems to have switched the button for Canadian Authorities. Similarities between the LionAir & Ethiopian flight profiles, that apparently weren't available earlier.
"Never mistake motion for action." Ernest Hemingway
 
SwissCanuck
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:59 pm

Really disappointed my country followed the hysteria.

The only upshot here is pressure to get at least an initial finding quickly.
 
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LockheedBBD
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:59 pm

Canada is the latest country to ground the 737 MAX:
https://globalnews.ca/news/5051366/marc ... -8-safety/
 
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Erebus
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 4:00 pm

Dominion301 wrote:
Link to Minister Garneau speaking live regarding grounding of all MAXes in Canadian airspace: https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/garnea ... -1.5054234

Now it's just the US.


Garneau said the decision was made after his department received new information.

Interested in knowing what that new information is.
 
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piedmontf284000
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 4:00 pm

LockheedBBD wrote:
Canada is the latest country to ground the 737 MAX:
https://globalnews.ca/news/5051366/marc ... -8-safety/


And then there was one... The US is on an island now. If there is new data that was revealed to Canada this morning which required then to ban both the max 8 & 9, from flying over Canadian airspace, then it would seem its pretty damming evidence to the air worthiness of the Max aircraft.
Last edited by piedmontf284000 on Wed Mar 13, 2019 4:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
zhiao
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 4:01 pm

BlueSky1976 wrote:
Boeing's lobbyists are hard at work to ensure FAA doesn't follow - knowing how the things work in good 'ole USA.


Yes, the safest air space in the world with by far the most traffic.
 
StarAC17
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 4:02 pm

SkyGrunt wrote:
It's official. Canada bans all flights in Canadian airspace for MAX 8 aircraft. I'll link it when I can

Sent from my BBD100-2 using Tapatalk


I was thinking Marc Garneau told AC, WS and WG behind the scenes that they have 24 hours to arrange their fleets as they will ground the MAX today.
I do not think this announcement took either airline by surprise when it was announced.
Engineers Rule The World!!!!!
 
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seahawk
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 4:02 pm

mcdu wrote:
PW100 wrote:
DL717 wrote:
All this finger pointing and no one wants to ask a simple question. Why the hell was a guy with 200 hours sitting in the right seat of a 737?

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/12/busi ... chool.html


Do you find it similarly worrying that the US Air Force is sending 200 hrs pilots in fast jets armed with live amo over populated areas in the US . . .


The training a Air Force pilot receives is much more in-depth and difficult than civilian training. The military will wash a pilot out at the least sign of issues. In the civilian world the pilot is usually paying for his own training and the training company doesn’t want a reputation for washing out candidates and they train you until you run out of money or they can pass you at the bare minimum. Do not confuse a 200 civil trained pilot with a 200 hour military trained pilot. It’s apples to oranges. I’m not saying a 200 hour civil pilot might be a great stick and rudder pilot and maybe a great pilot overall. But the training received is significantly different.


But the whole world is not the US. Ab initio flight training is much more similar to military training than the usual US ATPL training.
 
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flybynight
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Joined: Wed Jul 30, 2003 1:58 pm

Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 4:03 pm

Canadian Minister states the similarities between the two crashes has passed a certain treshold that warranted this action.

That doesn’t mean the causes are related but the there is enough causality to warrant the grounding.

It makes sense frankly to be cautious instead of being overconfident such as is the case with the FAA and Boeing.

I am a Boeing fan and I live nearby, but at this point I feel the US needs to follow the rest of the World.
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B747forever
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Joined: Mon May 21, 2007 9:50 pm

Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 4:03 pm

Wow, so truly only AA, WN and UA remain as the only operators of MAX aircraft.
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Noshow
Posts: 936
Joined: Wed Jun 15, 2016 3:20 pm

Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 4:06 pm

Why don't we hear about the recorders? Who has them right now? We need to finally know whether the two crashes are related or not?
 
B747forever
Posts: 13758
Joined: Mon May 21, 2007 9:50 pm

Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 4:07 pm

flybynight wrote:

It makes sense frankly to be cautious instead of being overconfident such as is the case with the FAA and Boeing.

I am a Boeing fan and I live nearby, but at this point I feel the US needs to follow the rest of the World.


I agree with you. Somehow it is hard to not be suspicious about why the FAA/US might be the last to ground a US made airplane.
Work Hard, Fly Right
 
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flybynight
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Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 4:08 pm

B747forever wrote:
Wow, so truly only AA, WN and UA remain as the only operators of MAX aircraft.


And potentially any flights UA or AA have into Canada on the MAX will need to be changed to a NG or 320/319 (or others).
I don’t think a lot of AA and UA planes going into Canada were using the MAX, but I wouldn’t be surprised if some plane changes will have to take place.
Last edited by flybynight on Wed Mar 13, 2019 4:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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hoons90
Posts: 3533
Joined: Wed Aug 01, 2001 10:15 pm

Re: Should airline regulators consider grounding B737 MAX series

Wed Mar 13, 2019 4:08 pm

keesje wrote:
American, Southwest, United Airlines can no longer fly on Canadian destinations.

Satelite data seems to have switched the button for Canadian Authorities. Similarities between the LionAir & Ethiopian flight profiles, that apparently weren't available earlier.


Southwest doesn't even fly to Canada, and AA and UA don't use the MAX to any Canadian destination.
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