wernerga3
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Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-1987)

Thu Apr 25, 2019 1:36 pm

Hi fellow forum members. As stated, I will be posting once a week for five weeks with each subsequent era article. This is the fourth article of five. Stay tuned each week for the rest of the story! I have cleared these articles with the moderators, and have created a separate thread which introduced the topic here:
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1419061

For those of you who are just joining, you may want to begin with the first three articles, which can be found here:
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1419683
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1420157
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1420685

Intro: Flying Tigers Line offers Pan Am the Addition of the 747-200
In came the 747-200. A plane that was nearly identical to the majority of the fleet as far as operations and maintenance aspects were concerned, but which was more modern and efficient than their aging 747-100s. While Pan Am used three 747-200Fs in the late 1970s, they were not using any 747-200s for passenger service at the time. Thus in 1983, Pan Am acquired three 747-200s from the Flying Tigers Line. They would also acquire four additional 747-200s over the next few years (seven total) by facilitating strategic trades of their other aircraft. The biggest noticeable difference between the 747-100 and the 747-200 was the upper deck. The 747-200 featured ten windows on either side rather than the spaced out three windows on either side of the 747-100 (with very few exceptions where a 747-100 was converted to have ten windows as well). As it was 1983 when Pan Am acquired the Flying Tigers’ 747-200s, the first 747-200s would be outfitted very briefly with the bi-centennial era interiors. An interesting thing to note, is that during this era, Pan Am was experimenting with paint schemes on their 747s. There were three types of schemes flying during this era: The updated classic scheme, the updated classic scheme with a larger stripe, and the low stripe scheme (which also featured larger dark blue letters). The low stripe scheme was experimental, and would lead ultimately to the new billboard scheme which would arrive in 1985 and remain with Pan Am until its demise (next article).

Image

Pan Am had already identified that the pacific routes were less cost effective for them than they initially thought. They also knew that the routes were worth a lot to the right airline, and in the early 1980s, began thinking of ways to sell the pacific routes along with the 747-SPs that serviced them. Pan Am had sold its pacific routes along with its 747-SPs to United Airlines in 1985 to take effect in early 1986. However, the cabin design of the 747-SP was not updated along with the cabins of the 747-100 and 747-200 in 1984, only the seat count of the SP’s clipper class was updated to one hundred seats from the previous fifty-six. Interesting that it soldiered on for a few years wearing an old cabin, almost certain of its own demise with the airline. The worst part of all of this is that when Pan Am got out of the pacific game, not only did United get into it by purchasing their routes and planes, but American Airlines did as well. Unfortunately, Pan Am had missed out on this opportunity as it sold the planes and routes a bit prematurely.


1984-1987: Refreshing the Entire Cabin to Stay Current with Not Much to Spare
Around this time in 1984, Pan Am had announced once again large losses. With increased competition from carriers after the 1978 deregulation bill fallout coming into full swing some years later, airlines such as TWA were constantly back-and-forth competitively with their cabin offerings at the time. Pan Am needed to do something, and quickly. In came the refreshing of all the cabins on the 747-100 and 747-200. As I had stated already, the 747-200s were with Pan Am extremely briefly in its old bi-centennial era cabin outfit, until the final details of the refresh came through in early 1984. As usual, Pan Am phased planes through the changes and the changes were as follows:

Beginning with the first class cabin, this cabin got a drastic look overhaul with minimal input. They took the red and dark blue sleeperette seat setups, and changed them to all dark blue. They did a similar thing in 1973 when they changed the galaxy beige and 747 blue seating to all 747 blue. It’s an easy way to take inventory, such as fabric on hand, and repurpose it to make something feel fresh for little cost. Along with the fabric update, came new dark blue curtains and carpeting, and a new front cone wall with a dark blue fabric featuring a silver clipper ship sail. The wall panels were also updated in design. In certain photos, the headrest covers are matching blue- as they were in the bi-centennial era cabins. But, in some photos, they are contrasting red. This could have just been because they were using the left-over red covers from the previous era. The flight attendants would also receive slightly updated uniforms, with a much more conservative navy, almost black look. In the 747-100 and 747-200, the location of first class was the A-Zone, and once again two rows on the front left of the B-Zone (like 1976-1979). Normally, I would have us step upstairs into the upper deck, however, since the upper deck would become clipper class for the first time in 1984, I feel it should follow clipper class instead.

Image

We talked in the last article about how clipper class was made official in 1980 to be 8 abreast with a special section of the cabin, and special offerings as well. Clipper class would prove to be very popular for Pan Am. They had tested it a few years prior in both the 747-SP and 747-100, before officially offering the separate cabin which was redesigned and unified in design across the fleet. The only problem was that while clipper class was very popular, airlines such as TWA came in and switched their business class seating offerings from 8 abreast to 6 abreast. While it was initially only for TWA overseas flights, they would ultimately do this for all their widebody jets, putting Pan Am yet again at a disadvantage. Since the official clipper class was so new, only four years old at the time, it was a big blunder to Pan Am to have to re-do the cabins once again with such little time out of the last investment. To stay current however, they went ahead and changed the clipper class seating on all the 747-100 and 747-200 planes to become 6 abreast. They would also move clipper class to the upper deck in addition to the B-Zone of the cabins in lieu of the previous upper deck first class sleeperette seating.

Now that Pan Am had updated its clipper class offering, lets discuss the design in detail. As I stated, it was in the B-Zone and upper deck of the 747-100 and 747-200. The seats were all new to accommodate the six abreast seating setups. They were much larger, mainly wider than the previous seats, and remained an all-in-one design. They would now be tufted however with two tuft points in the seat back center. They were made of a fabric cloth that was a slightly deeper blue than the current gray-blue 8 abreast seat color, and they featured matching headrest covers. There were small circle patterns in the seat cushion centers, and the headrest covers would also feature this design. The designers and engineers stated that they wanted people to look at the cabin and feel it was completely new, even though the plane was aged and only refreshed. Carpeting and walls were updated to go along with the new look and help with that vision. Interesting to note is that the wall panels were updated later in this refresh. Certain photos show the old wall panels, and certain photos show the updated wall panels. Along with the updated wall panels came slightly updated headrest covers which matched the circles in the seat center, rather than being all blue like the outer fabric of the seat. Since clipper class was also on the upper deck, lets talk about that next.

Image

As part of the change to increase revenue, they decided to take the first class out of the upper deck, and add clipper class instead. Pan Am felt it would make sense to change out the upper deck first class with clipper class for additional seating and more revenue opportunity. Sure enough, even though the 747-100 and 747-200 had the same upper deck sizes, due to different usable space on the upper decks, the 747-200 would in time offer two additional clipper class seats upstairs where the 747-100’s old cumbersome galley resided. The 747-100 would have fourteen upper deck seats, and the 200 would have sixteen upper deck seats. Therefore, on the new upper deck layout, regardless of 747 style there were additional passengers upstairs as compared to the previous first class setup. All of this bearing the fact that the seats were less expensive- something they may not have exactly kept in mind in this equation. Also, as I stated, on the 747-200, the upper deck had ten windows on either side rather than the 747-100s three spaced out windows on either side. Nevertheless, the upper deck had become clipper class for the first time, and it would be the first time that the upper deck, situated in the front of the plane, would not service first class in the form of a lounge, dining room, or seating. Now that we discussed the biggest change of this era- the clipper class updates, lets move onto the back of the plane, the cabin class, or simply known as coach.

Image

Since clipper class got all the attention this go around, coach would get the same approach as first class had. Instead of an entire re-do, Pan Am would simply re-upholster the chairs and switch some of them out with slimmer units. The wall panels would remain the same from the previous era even though first and clipper had received new panels. As for the new upholstery, it was dark blue, just as in the first class cabin, but it also featured purple, red and burgundy seats. The C-Zone was burgundy and purple. The D-Zone was blue and purple. And the E-Zone was red and burgundy. As with the previous era, the seat colors were arranged in sets of two from left to right/ right to left. The 747-100 had recently received updated seats in coach (previous era) to be consistent with the at the time 747-SP (which was being phased out during this era via a sale to United). During that 1980 transition, the coach seat frames had become much narrower as compared to the original 1970-1978, and 1978-1980 747-100 coach seats with their layered-cushion designs.

If you look closely at the pictures of this era, it appears that certain center rows of seats retained the 1980-1984 design with protruding headrest, while the outer rows of seats are slimmer and slightly different with longer headrest covers. These slim-line seats originated in the E-Zone only in 1984, and then over the next few years, made their way up the outer aisles gradually to help fit additional rows and help save weight. They were doing anything they could to fit additional passengers in their coach cabins, even if it meant mis-matching the seats. They were also thinking of any way to cut down on weight to help their fuel go further. Ultimately all of the seats would become this slim-line design (including the center rows), but it was interesting to see the half and half seat-type cabin during my research. This concept of high-density cabin class seating was phased in after multiple ad-hoc studies looking at cost structure. Pan Am did decided against “system-wide density” cabin class seating (meaning, an all coach 747), as they showed it would have had to yield a load factor of 74.8% in order to cover operating costs, which was not realistic. Part of the problem with all of this was that they were neglecting these cabin class passengers in so far as experience, because they were focusing so heavily on their first and clipper class passengers at the time. Their logic was that they should place more stake in the higher per-fare paying passengers, than in the majority of passengers who would incrementally increase revenue. While that read a little grim, remember that Pan Am was focusing on the premium customer in such a way that I would not necessarily demonize them for not immediately recognizing this. Stay tuned next week for the fifth article which dives into the final era of Pan Am’s 747 and its cabin design: 1987 to 1991.

Image
 
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Keith2004
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Thu Apr 25, 2019 2:42 pm

The evolution is truly something remarkable to see when so well illustrated
 
beachbum1970
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Thu Apr 25, 2019 3:40 pm

Another great chapter in the history and design of the Pan Am 747 cabins. Thanks so much for your excellent work!
 
sspontak
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Thu Apr 25, 2019 4:34 pm

Great job on Article # 4. I see the super-sized bins in First Class and Clipper Class. From the photos it appears the Coach cabin did not get the larger bins supporting what you wrote that Pan Am prioritized First Class and Clipper Class.
 
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Adipasquale
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Thu Apr 25, 2019 4:34 pm

Thanks for sharing! It's really interesting to see all the different interiors, and how they reflect the styles of their times.
DH8A DH8B CR1 CR2 CR7 CR9 E45 E70 E75 E90 D93 M88 319 320 321 333 343 712 732 733 734 73G 738 739 744 752 753 762 763 77L 77W
 
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PPVLC
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Thu Apr 25, 2019 4:38 pm

Thank you, another great one!
Cabin crew L188 707 727 737 767 A300 DC10 MD11 777 747
 
sspontak
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Thu Apr 25, 2019 4:45 pm

Adipasquale wrote:
Thanks for sharing! It's really interesting to see all the different interiors, and how they reflect the styles of their times.


Yes and how it started to reflect the financial difficulties of Pan Am.
 
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foxecho
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Thu Apr 25, 2019 5:21 pm

Thank you for posting all this information, I am a PA kid, mom worked for them until the National merger..I remember all the blue, red and gold palettes on the 747s and 727s when I was a kid, I seem to recall on the 747s C was red and gold, D was blue E was blue and red... this would have been in the 83-86 time frame. I work for Delta now myself, almost for two decades, I hate that every airline has gone to the blue for every aircraft, at least in the US....

Andrew
JFK/MEM/MCI/SYR/
..uh, we'll need that to live......
 
wernerga3
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Thu Apr 25, 2019 5:24 pm

foxecho wrote:
I remember all the blue, red and gold palettes on the 747s and 727s when I was a kid, I seem to recall on the 747s C was red and gold, D was blue E was blue and red... this would have been in the 83-86 time frame.


Check out the previous era's article for that color pallet information:
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1420685
 
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ClassicLover
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Thu Apr 25, 2019 7:02 pm

Some excellent pictures there, and I especially like how some are taken from ads, some are private crew photos, and some are behind the scenes shots. It gives a really good flavour to the entire thing.

What a great series! It's a shame it's coming to an end, but I'm certainly looking forward to the next one. Excellent work!
I do enjoy a spot of flying, especially when it's not in economy!
 
panamair
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Thu Apr 25, 2019 7:30 pm

sspontak wrote:
I see the super-sized bins in First Class and Clipper Class. From the photos it appears the Coach cabin did not get the larger bins supporting what you wrote that Pan Am prioritized First Class and Clipper Class.


I don't remember the sequence/chronology but the Economy cabin did get the super-sized bins as well. You can see them at the 4:30 mark or 6:45 mark of this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZcK2avk3oiM

wernerga3 wrote:
The biggest noticeable difference between the 747-100 and the 747-200 was the upper deck. The 747-200 featured ten windows on either side rather than the spaced out three windows on either side of the 747-100 (with very few exceptions where a 747-100 was converted to have ten windows as well)


Indeed, the ex-UA 747-122s (ships N4703U, N4704U for example) that Pan Am acquired all had ten windows on the upper deck.

Thanks again for another great instalment!
 
n729pa
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Thu Apr 25, 2019 8:02 pm

N748PA had an experimental hybrid livery too circa 1989, I flew on her from Seattle to London and saw her a few times afterwards. Fantastic reading these articles brings back happy memories, always enjoyed travelling with Pan Am, flew them five times in all N729PA N751PA N730PA N727PA and N748PA. I still have some books and stuff from these flights somewhere. Happy days.
 
N649DL
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Thu Apr 25, 2019 8:07 pm

sspontak wrote:
Adipasquale wrote:
Thanks for sharing! It's really interesting to see all the different interiors, and how they reflect the styles of their times.


Yes and how it started to reflect the financial difficulties of Pan Am.


Pan Am had a lot of debt during this time. Ironically, their most well-kept interiors were the final chapter before shutdown where they had the all blue and white dotted interiors on most of the fleet.
 
wernerga3
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Thu Apr 25, 2019 8:38 pm

N649DL wrote:
Pan Am had a lot of debt during this time. Ironically, their most well-kept interiors were the final chapter before shutdown where they had the all blue and white dotted interiors on most of the fleet.


That would be blue and gold dotted (for coach). This will all be revealed in the final article next week!
 
sspontak
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Thu Apr 25, 2019 9:47 pm

panamair wrote:
sspontak wrote:
I see the super-sized bins in First Class and Clipper Class. From the photos it appears the Coach cabin did not get the larger bins supporting what you wrote that Pan Am prioritized First Class and Clipper Class.


I don't remember the sequence/chronology but the Economy cabin did get the super-sized bins as well. You can see them at the 4:30 mark or 6:45 mark of this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZcK2avk3oiM

wernerga3 wrote:
The biggest noticeable difference between the 747-100 and the 747-200 was the upper deck. The 747-200 featured ten windows on either side rather than the spaced out three windows on either side of the 747-100 (with very few exceptions where a 747-100 was converted to have ten windows as well)


Indeed, the ex-UA 747-122s (ships N4703U, N4704U for example) that Pan Am acquired all had ten windows on the upper deck.

Thanks again for another great instalment!


Thanks for pointing this out Panamair. That is a great video. 8-)
 
Ryanair01
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Thu Apr 25, 2019 10:18 pm

I believe the gentleman pictured in your upper deck photograph is Milutin Velimirovich, who was Junior Purser killed aboard Flight 103.

On a more mundane note, most coach cabins did get super bins and new panels but some aircraft still featured old panels and small bins by 1991.

Clipper was split into three cabins, 1. upper deck, 2. aft section of B Zone (forward had two rows of First), and 3. forward section of C Zone.

In coach the fabrics retained the bicentennial patterns, but with more somber colors and the galleys were wrapped in a blue carpet. In First the final leather and sheepskin and in Clipper brown herringbone were both launched in 1986. So the designs shown here didn't quite last until 1987 as I understand it (but I stand to be corrected).

I believe this change coincided with the opening of a "First & Clipper Class Terminal" at JFK, where the original Worldport rotunda was converted to a 'private' First and Clipper Class check-in, complete with Italian marble floors, mahogany accents, wrap-around lounge seating and lots of plants and flowers.

Image

Onboard china etc was also changed at this time. I think Pan Am reinvested proceeds of the Pacific Sale for all of this.

Once again thank you for such a fantastic series of posts!!!
 
wernerga3
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Thu Apr 25, 2019 10:53 pm

Ryanair01 wrote:
In First the final leather and sheepskin and in Clipper brown herringbone were both launched in 1986. So the designs shown here didn't quite last until 1987 as I understand it (but I stand to be corrected). I believe this change coincided with the opening of a "First & Clipper Class Terminal" at JFK, where the original Worldport rotunda was converted to a 'private' First and Clipper Class check-in.

All of my research pointed at a late 1986 into 1987 transition. They heavily advertised the changes coming, in late 1986, and all the advertisements said "over the next few months." I know the world port first class/clipper class lounge opened first, on May 23, 1986. Regardless, these changes came just in time for the contracted omniflight (Bell 222 and WG30) helicopter service to be grounded February 1, 1988 (another story), and Pan Am needing to re-capture the high end market with other perks such as lounges and new seats.

I don't want to give away the whole next article either, which is why I have not delved into the details like you did. But yes you could say it was 1986 technically. I'm sticking with 1987.
 
wernerga3
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Thu Apr 25, 2019 11:56 pm

wernerga3 wrote:
Ryanair01 wrote:
In First the final leather and sheepskin and in Clipper brown herringbone were both launched in 1986. So the designs shown here didn't quite last until 1987 as I understand it (but I stand to be corrected). I believe this change coincided with the opening of a "First & Clipper Class Terminal" at JFK, where the original Worldport rotunda was converted to a 'private' First and Clipper Class check-in.

All of my research pointed at a late 1986 into 1987 transition. They heavily advertised the changes coming, in late 1986, and all the advertisements said "over the next few months." I know the world port first class/clipper class lounge opened first, on May 23, 1986. Regardless, these changes came just in time for the contracted omniflight (Bell 222 and WG30) helicopter service to be grounded February 1, 1988 (another story), and Pan Am needing to re-capture the high end market with other perks such as lounges and new seats.

I don't want to give away the whole next article either, which is why I have not delved into the details like you did. But yes you could say it was 1986 technically. I'm sticking with 1987.


Never mind, I was correct all along. It did not occur until 1987.
Image
 
PA91
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Fri Apr 26, 2019 7:17 am

Thank you so much for the great work! Brings back lots of memories from the observation deck at ZRH watching PA B747s taking off to JFK.
I do have a question about the upper deck galley and the seating layout in Clipper Class of the 747-212B which PA operated. According to your article, the 747-200 had 16 upper deck seats (Clipper Class) whereas the 747-100 had only 14 due to the galley layout and upper deck length. The final configuration of the 747-212B was 21/44/348 and the 747-121 had 21/44/347. Both 747 variants had the same seat count in Clipper Class (44). From the video someone posted in an earlier article (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImWVArBrY_A) you can see the disembarkation from a PA 747-200 with a short insight of Clipper Class in the B-Zone. If 16 Clipper Class seats are accommodated in the upper deck (as the South America Config [B747-122 and B747-123 used to have], the B zone would have to have a different arrangement than in the 747-121, otherwise the seat count does not work. From the short video It looks like the -212B had the same seating arrangement in B-Zone than the -121 had. Or were the two additional Clipper Class seats in the upper deck used as Crew Rest seats? What did the upper deck galley look like? Are there any photos?

Thanks for your replies. Keep up the good work.
 
wernerga3
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Fri Apr 26, 2019 12:44 pm

PA91 wrote:
I do have a question about the upper deck galley and the seating layout in Clipper Class of the 747-212B which PA operated. According to your article, the 747-200 had 16 upper deck seats (Clipper Class) whereas the 747-100 had only 14 due to the galley layout and upper deck length. The final configuration of the 747-212B was 21/44/348 and the 747-121 had 21/44/347. Both 747 variants had the same seat count in Clipper Class (44).

From the video someone posted in an earlier article (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImWVArBrY_A) you can see the disembarkation from a PA 747-200 with a short insight of Clipper Class in the B-Zone. If 16 Clipper Class seats are accommodated in the upper deck (as the South America Config [B747-122 and B747-123 used to have], the B zone would have to have a different arrangement than in the 747-121, otherwise the seat count does not work. From the short video It looks like the -212B had the same seating arrangement in B-Zone than the -121 had. Or were the two additional Clipper Class seats in the upper deck used as Crew Rest seats? What did the upper deck galley look like? Are there any photos?


During this era, initially the upper deck counts were identical even though the 747-200 had more space on the front right. Then they added those two additional seats toward the end of this era in the front right of the 200, before they did a complete re-do of the cabins for the next era in 1987. In 1987, the 747-100 and 747-200 would get completely different cabin layouts and this will be highlighted in the next era's article. The final 747-200 layout was not 21/44/347, it was 39/52/286.

Pan Am was phasing in the seven 747-200s that it had acquired, and they seemingly did not have separate seating charts for the 200 at first. When the Pan Am Blue Program launched (next era), that was when they capitalized on the 747-100 and 747-200 being laid out differently for different routes, and that is what the video you are referencing is showing you (the different 1987-1991 era 747-200 layout). Please be patient, as this and many of the requested details will be revealed next week!
 
wernerga3
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Fri Apr 26, 2019 2:31 pm

PA91 wrote:

From the video someone posted in an earlier article (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImWVArBrY_A) you can see the disembarkation from a PA 747-200 with a short insight of Clipper Class in the B-Zone. If 16 Clipper Class seats are accommodated in the upper deck (as the South America Config [B747-122 and B747-123 used to have], the B zone would have to have a different arrangement than in the 747-121, otherwise the seat count does not work. From the short video It looks like the -212B had the same seating arrangement in B-Zone than the -121 had. Or were the two additional Clipper Class seats in the upper deck used as Crew Rest seats? What did the upper deck galley look like? Are there any photos?


I wish you could edit posts- it would make this easier. That video was not a 200- it was a 100. The 200 did not have a B-Zone clipper class per the "south American" configuration. Something that was very confusing was that Pan Am called their final era (1987-1991) layouts "normal" and "south American" configurations, but as I researched, all seven 200s were in the "south American" configuration.
 
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foxecho
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Fri Apr 26, 2019 5:08 pm

Absolutely LOVE it! Thanks for posting!

Andrew

Check out the previous era's article for that color pallet information:
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1420685[/quote]
..uh, we'll need that to live......
 
wernerga3
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Wed May 01, 2019 1:34 pm

In anticipation of the final article dropping tomorrow, I wanted to give those who have not seen these threads a chance to catch up. Bump!
 
wernerga3
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #4 | Refresh Era: Even During Financial Difficulties, You Can Still Look Good (1984-198

Thu May 02, 2019 1:40 pm

Keith2004 wrote:
The evolution is truly something remarkable to see when so well illustrated

beachbum1970 wrote:
Thanks so much for your excellent work!

sspontak wrote:
Great job on Article # 4

Adipasquale wrote:
Thanks for sharing!

PPVLC wrote:
Thank you, another great one!

foxecho wrote:
Thank you for posting all this information

ClassicLover wrote:
What a great series! It's a shame it's coming to an end, but I'm certainly looking forward to the next one. Excellent work!

Ryanair01 wrote:
Once again thank you for such a fantastic series of posts!!!

PA91 wrote:
Thank you so much for the great work!

Thank you all for the kind words. The fifth, and final article has been officially posted here:
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1421661

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