wernerga3
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Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 1:40 pm

Hi fellow forum members. As stated, I will be posting once a week for five weeks with each subsequent era article. This is the fifth, and final article of five. I have cleared these articles with the moderators, and have created a separate thread which introduced the topic here:
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1419061

For those of you who are just joining, you may want to begin with the first four articles, which can be found here:
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1419683
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1420157
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1420685
viewtopic.php?f=3&t=1421125

Intro: Following the Sheepskin Trend While Reorganizing Cabins
After hundreds of hours of research and writing, I finally commence the final, fifth article about the final era of Pan Am’s 747 cabin design. This was truly the end of the road for the struggling airline, but they never gave up along the way. By this point, the 747s had received the updated billboard paint scheme that had evolved from the low stripe experimental paint scheme from a few years earlier. Immediately following, announced in late 1986 for an arrival in early 1987, was to be a complete makeover of the 747 cabins to go along with the newly painted planes. The challenge was how Pan Am aircraft interiors would relate directly to the company’s new livery. Both the 747-100 and 747-200 would receive the new cabins, and they would be laid out differently based on the airline’s identified needs. In came the Pan Am Blue Program, a program designed to overhaul all three of the cabins across the fleet. Now that the interior was going to get an update again, Pan Am would capitalize on the two types of 747s being different, and would lay them out different accordingly.

Pan Am had identified that the South American market yielded some of the highest revenue paying passengers, who were more willing to pay for first over clipper class. While there were a few 747-100s which were in this configuration, it was primarily the 747-200, so I am going to refer to the South American configuration as the 747-200 configuration throughout this piece. In this South American configuration, the B-Zone became first class, with an increase of eighteen first class seats as compared to the primary configuration. Also, the clipper class was pushed back further into the cabin- increasing the number of clipper class seats by eight as compared to the standard 747-100. The standard 747-100 had gained seating, and its capacity increased from 381 to 412 compared to the previous era. In an interesting turn of events, Pan Am had now outfitted the 747-200s (South American) seating with fewer than the 747-100s, at 377 seats. The reasoning was because the entire B-Zone of the 747-200, which was previously clipper class, had now been converted to first class, resulting in fewer overall seats. Originally, in 1987, the 747-200 of this era was 347 seats, then they added four clipper seats, twenty seven coach seats, and subtracted one first class seat in 1989, bringing it up thirty seats to 377 total (added seats are highlighted yellow on seat charts throughout article). In a class by class comparison, the final 747-100 offered 21/44/347, whereas the final 747-200 offered 39/52/286.

Image

Now that we have discussed the reorganization of cabins for the final era, let’s talk about the trends and people associated with this era in design for Pan Am. The biggest cabin trend of the late 1980s was that of lambswool. All around the industry, this now controversial, then vogue covering, would create some of the softest journeys in passenger transport. Today’s seats, industrious and ever-adjusting, certainly have their advantages, but lack the cushy sink-in-your-seat feeling that lambswool offered. One airline which heavily promoted the use of lambswool seating at the time was American Airlines. In the mid to late 1980s, wide-body American flagship international planes including the DC10, 767, and 747SP, were outfitted with new cabins featuring sheepskin and leather sleeper seats. Weber would be the primary designer and manufacturer of airplane seats for American for years to come, and Pan Am saw this trend loud and clear.

To remain competitive, and take one last stab at the market, Pan Am hired Jennifer Coutts Clay, to spear-head the Pan Am Blue Program, and re-do all three of their cabin offerings. Through the design direction of Philip and Gail George, Jennifer laid out a comprehensive overhaul of the 747-100 and 747-200 cabins (in addition to the intro of the new Airbus A310-300 cabins at the time) within no doubt a tight budget- The budget was $25,000,000 to re-do all the cabins. Through the systematic approach of simplifying the cabins and focusing on the materials, Clay would transform the cabins into the final era design that would last from 1987 until Pan Am’s demise on December 4, 1991.


1987-1991: Three Final Cabins for a dying Airline
This is it. This is what it all came down to. The final cabin designs. Beginning with the first class cabin, we had discussed it was located in the A-Zone in the 747-100, and in the A and B-Zones in the 747-200. There was increased capacity in the 747-200 as they had identified the South American routes as yielding more first class passengers and therefore greater revenue potential. As stated earlier, in 1989, the 747-200 lost one first class seat in its configuration as well. The seat designs were new for the first time since 1979. While they retained the sleeperette function, the design was now Lackawanna genuine leather dyed navy blue with a matching one piece Australian merino sheepskin covering the center insert. This was very popular in the industry, and weber, the company who provided American with nearly all its seats, would also be the manufacturer of this seat exclusive to Pan Am. The sheepskin insert changed from inception to conclusion. The initial sheepskin was a dark blue, almost black look. The final sheepskin was a lighter grey and was inserted in the same place. The initial seats were an experiment using strands of sheepskin that could be brushed clean, but the seats molted and went bald very quickly. They changed it to a more resilient lighter gray product that worked with a special light-suction vacuum designed just for cleaning the sheepskin. The seat pitch was 55 inches, the recline was 60 degrees, and the width was 26.5 inches. Also to note: They changed the leg rest from a two-piece system, to a one-piece system in 1990. When they did this (on the 747 and A310), the life vest moved from under the seat, to between the seats per a company memo. In the single seat (1J), the life vest moved to the wall, and the flight attendant was briefed to show the passenger in that seat the change. There was no longer a headrest cover of any kind- most likely to cut down on cost and the switch-out time. Gone were the graceful days of meticulousness, and in came the bureaucratic days of getting it done on a dime. The credenza in the center of first class got a gleaming silver finish on the side panels, and the top surfaces were surrounded by navy blue leather. An interesting point is that the 747-100 first class featured twenty-one seats at this time, and that was the fewest amount of first class seats in the section to date. The only other major change to the first class cabin was that a big silver globe portrait now adorned the nose-cone wall. That wall was an evolution of the clipper ship designs promoting exploration and Pan Am’s experience. The first class cabin was not the only star of the make-over show however. Clipper class would also get a rejuvenation.

Image

Moving down the cabin, revealed the new clipper class. The location of the clipper class was the B-Zone and upper deck of the 747-100, and the front of the C-Zone and upper deck of the 747-200. On the 747-200, four extra seats were added in 1989 to the main level. The seat design was a new all-in-one design. While clipper class remained the same six abreast layout, the seating had been significantly updated to a more demure herringbone-weave tweed purchased from Aabe. Philip George, the designer, stated that he got the inspiration from the sight of surface-stitched leather elbow patches, and the traditional tweed jackets worn by members of the English gentry during the hunting season. This would be the first time pan am deviated away from cloth fabrics along with the new first class lambswool and leather cabin. The seats featured stitched in leather headrests covers and seat back pockets. They were initially upholstered in brown, or gray tweed with a dark brown sewn-in leather headrest. Later in the cycle, all of the seats had changed to gray with a dark blue leather headrest sewn in due to maintenance implications. These later seats used the remnants left over from the first class leather seating material to keep costs down. Seat pitch was 38 inches, the recline was 33 degrees, and the width was 26.5 inches (same width as first class). In the mid-1980s, Pan Am had stated that they were going to add leg support to their clipper class seats as TWA and others at the time had evolved one step further from the six abreast setup to include those as well. Unfortunately, Pan Am would never get around to implementing this due to budget constraints. That was the fist time I saw them not go through with a cabin update they had planned, in all of my research. Since clipper class was also upstairs during this era, let’s go upstairs next.

Image

While they did not get the leg rests installed as planned, the upper deck still remained clipper class as it had previously been. It received the same update to the seats as the main floor. The upper deck of the 747-200 housed two additional clipper class seats thanks to its more open layout. There was not much that changed otherwise. I did find it interesting that they kept the upper deck as clipper class on the 747-200 when the entire A and B zones were first class. It felt like an after thought that the upper deck did not become first class as well given the area of the cabin and the methodology. Finally, we go downstairs and to the back of the plane. To the final cabin of the final era of Pan Am’s 747 cabins.

Image

As for the coach cabin, many 747s got the updated coach cabin, but some retained the previous era’s cabin instead. The design concept was that budget conscious corporate travelers were starting to fly economy, and that they wanted a calm design for a business-like environment. The new design would be a bright blue and/or dark blue fabric with small gold motifs woven in echoing the Pan Am globe. This wool upholstery design was extremely popular of that era, and a similar pattern/design would be in American Airlines planes before and after this Pan Am cabin era. Initial trials featured fabrics from testori in two shades of blue- They ended up going with the darker shade for maintenance implications, similar to what they did in clipper class- going to an all one-color tweed. The seat design was the same all-in-one slim-line frame, but it was reupholstered. The tray table was still incorporated into the seat back, and the layout was still 10 abreast. The seat pitch was 32 inches, the recline was 30 degrees, and the seat width was 20.25 inches. The 747-200 had gained twenty-seven additional seats between 1987 and 1989. If you recall from the previous article, I stated that coach cabins received some new slimmer seats, and kept some older seats with protruding headrests in the center rows. By this era, all of the protruding headrest seats had been replaced by the slimmer framed seats. Certain 747s of the era retained the old coach cabin of red, blue and purple rather than get the bright blue update, however all the seats were slimmer as stated. This was particularly true of the 747-200s. This was because they simply did not have the resources to finalize all of their cabin updates- and therefore only reupholstered the ones that needed it the most with the new blue- primarily the 747-100s. Nevertheless, there were two different kinds of cabins for coach at this time, both designed for maximum revenue- with the new blue patterned design being the primary design at the time. This would be the end of traveling on a Pan Am 747, as December 4, 1991, they would cease to operate commercial passenger revenue flights on the type. While Pan Am went on for some years in various smaller outfits, none would fly a 747.

Image

And so, I want to end this long fifth article on more of a positive note. We looked at 25 years worth of 747 cabins. Three different types of 747s over five different eras. From its pre-production wooden mock-up stages in 1966, all the way through the end of Pan Am as an airline operating 747s in 1991. My favorite era was truly the launch era, as Pan Am was too big to fail. Even if creditors wanted to take them down, they had too much influence in the world to go anywhere. They continued to operate this way for a very long time, trying to curtail market hiccups, and stay competitive, while writing the future and being first to do so along the way. It wasn’t until the late 1980s that the world truly surpassed Pan Am’s ability to keep up. Once it happened, that was the end. And the end of more than just an airline- the end of a revolution.
 
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Keith2004
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 2:31 pm

Great Job,
Really enjoyed the series of posts
 
panamair
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 3:16 pm

wernerga3 wrote:
Pan Am had identified that the South American market yielded some of the highest revenue paying passengers, who were more willing to pay for first over clipper class. While there were a few 747-100s which were in this configuration, it was primarily the 747-200, so I am going to refer to the South American configuration as the 747-200 configuration throughout this piece. In this South American configuration, the B-Zone became first class, with an increase of eighteen first class seats as compared to the primary configuration. Also, the clipper class was pushed back further into the cabin- increasing the number of clipper class seats by eight as compared to the standard 747-100. The standard 747-100 had gained seating, and its capacity increased from 381 to 412 compared to the previous era. In an interesting turn of events, Pan Am had now outfitted the 747-200s (South American) seating with fewer than the 747-100s, at 377 seats. The reasoning was because the entire B-Zone of the 747-200, which was previously clipper class, had now been converted to first class, resulting in fewer overall seats. Originally, in 1987, the 747-200 of this era was 347 seats, then they added four clipper seats, twenty seven coach seats, and subtracted one first class seat in 1989, bringing it up thirty seats to 377 total (added seats are highlighted yellow on seat charts throughout article). In a class by class comparison, the final 747-100 offered 21/44/347, whereas the final 747-200 offered 39/52/286.



Thanks again for the great work on this series! I do want to point out though that I am pretty sure the South American configuration 747s were actually all a sub-fleet of 747-100s - specifically the ex-United and ex-American birds - at least as of 1989 (as far as my records show):

747-122 (ex-UA):
N4703U Clipper Nautilus
N4704U Clipper Belle of The Sea
N4710U Clipper Sea Lark
N4711U Clipper Witch of The Wave
N4712U Clipper Tradewind

747-123 (ex-AA):
N9670 Clipper Empress of The Skies
N9674 Clipper Beacon Light

The ex-UA ones had 10 windows on the upper deck - highly unusual for the 747-100s...I flew on a few of the 747-212Bs (e.g., N723PA, N726PA, N729PA, N730PA) during the 1989-91 timeframe and they were all in the regular configuration...
 
wernerga3
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 3:30 pm

panamair wrote:
wernerga3 wrote:
Pan Am had identified that the South American market yielded some of the highest revenue paying passengers, who were more willing to pay for first over clipper class. While there were a few 747-100s which were in this configuration, it was primarily the 747-200, so I am going to refer to the South American configuration as the 747-200 configuration throughout this piece. In this South American configuration, the B-Zone became first class, with an increase of eighteen first class seats as compared to the primary configuration. Also, the clipper class was pushed back further into the cabin- increasing the number of clipper class seats by eight as compared to the standard 747-100. The standard 747-100 had gained seating, and its capacity increased from 381 to 412 compared to the previous era. In an interesting turn of events, Pan Am had now outfitted the 747-200s (South American) seating with fewer than the 747-100s, at 377 seats. The reasoning was because the entire B-Zone of the 747-200, which was previously clipper class, had now been converted to first class, resulting in fewer overall seats. Originally, in 1987, the 747-200 of this era was 347 seats, then they added four clipper seats, twenty seven coach seats, and subtracted one first class seat in 1989, bringing it up thirty seats to 377 total (added seats are highlighted yellow on seat charts throughout article). In a class by class comparison, the final 747-100 offered 21/44/347, whereas the final 747-200 offered 39/52/286.



Thanks again for the great work on this series! I do want to point out though that I am pretty sure the South American configuration 747s were actually all a sub-fleet of 747-100s - specifically the ex-United and ex-American birds - at least as of 1989 (as far as my records show):

747-122 (ex-UA):
N4703U Clipper Nautilus
N4704U Clipper Belle of The Sea
N4710U Clipper Sea Lark
N4711U Clipper Witch of The Wave
N4712U Clipper Tradewind

747-123 (ex-AA):
N9670 Clipper Empress of The Skies
N9674 Clipper Beacon Light

The ex-UA ones had 10 windows on the upper deck - highly unusual for the 747-100s...I flew on a few of the 747-212Bs (e.g., N723PA, N726PA, N729PA, N730PA) during the 1989-91 timeframe and they were all in the regular configuration...


I appreciate the information. I do have to contest that N730PA (Clipper Sao Paulo) was indeed a 747-200 in the South American configuration- It primarily serviced Sao Paulo in South America. Pan Am did not do a very good job documenting these planes one way or the other. They had other issues at the time.
 
Transpac787
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 3:34 pm

panamair wrote:
Thanks again for the great work on this series! I do want to point out though that I am pretty sure the South American configuration 747s were actually all a sub-fleet of 747-100s - specifically the ex-United and ex-American birds


This is correct.

The 747-122 (ex-UA) and 747-123 (ex-AA) were both unique in that they were delivered with below-deck galleys, similar to concepts seen on DC10's and L1011's. The PanAm 747-121's, had the on-deck galleys, in order to maximize cargo space and revenue.

The "South American" configuration birds, while not explicitly depicted on the seat maps, had elevators in the galley units at doors 2LR and 4LR. That is, of course, why their galley space space shown on deck is much less than that of the other configuration.


wernerga3 wrote:
I appreciate the information. I do have to contest that N730PA (Clipper Sao Paulo) was indeed a 747-200 in the South American configuration- It primarily serviced Sao Paulo in South America. Pan Am did not do a very good job documenting these planes one way or the other. They had other issues at the time.


As far as I know, no 747-212B was ever delivered with, nor modified to have, below-deck galleys. Just because a 747-200 was used to/within South America, does not necessarily mandate it served with the "South American" configuration.
 
wernerga3
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 3:51 pm

Transpac787 wrote:

As far as I know... Just because a 747-200 was used to/within South America, does not necessarily mandate it served with the "South American" configuration.


This may be true- but very illogical if so. If it was named after a South American city and primarily served it, I find it extremely hard to believe that the plane would be in a standard config as they were trying to pull additional first/clipper revenue out of these S.A. flights- similar to what they did on the SPs over the Pacific some 10 years earlier.
 
Transpac787
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 4:14 pm

wernerga3 wrote:

This may be true- but very illogical if so. If it was named after a South American city and primarily served it, I find it extremely hard to believe that the plane would be in a standard config as they were trying to pull additional first/clipper revenue out of these S.A. flights- similar to what they did on the SPs over the Pacific some 10 years earlier.


The naming of an aircraft did not indicate dedicated scheduling to that city/region. Even to that point, N730PA was renamed "Clipper Gem of the Ocean", and photos of it in the database show it in LHR, CDG, FRA, ZRH, etc. "Clipper New York", for instance, did not just strictly serve JFK flights, nor did "Clipper Moscow Express" only serve SVO.

By the by, I'm still unaware of any 747-212B, or any 747-200B at all for that matter, that was ever delivered with - nor modified to have - the below-deck galleys. N730PA, almost assuredly, was in the standard configuration.
 
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ClassicLover
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 4:36 pm

A great finale to an excellent series of articles! Well done on all your research, that was one mammoth effort all round. Really pleased you chose to share all of these on here with us. I've enjoyed the journey and learned a lot. Fantastic work!
I do enjoy a spot of flying, especially when it's not in economy!
 
wernerga3
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 5:17 pm

ClassicLover wrote:
A great finale to an excellent series of articles! Well done on all your research, that was one mammoth effort all round. Really pleased you chose to share all of these on here with us. I've enjoyed the journey and learned a lot. Fantastic work!


Thank you- It is nice to see someone who appreciates the effort, rather than tearing it apart with little care.
 
wernerga3
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 5:22 pm

Transpac787 wrote:
wernerga3 wrote:

This may be true- but very illogical if so. If it was named after a South American city and primarily served it, I find it extremely hard to believe that the plane would be in a standard config as they were trying to pull additional first/clipper revenue out of these S.A. flights- similar to what they did on the SPs over the Pacific some 10 years earlier.


The naming of an aircraft did not indicate dedicated scheduling to that city/region. Even to that point, N730PA was renamed "Clipper Gem of the Ocean", and photos of it in the database show it in LHR, CDG, FRA, ZRH, etc. "Clipper New York", for instance, did not just strictly serve JFK flights, nor did "Clipper Moscow Express" only serve SVO.


That is not entirely true- For example, the A310-222s were named after the German cities they serviced. At this point, I would prefer not to go back and forth over something that neither of us has any concrete evidence of either way.

https://www.panam.org/images/HistoryRes ... cturer.pdf
 
PA91
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 5:51 pm

Thank you for the extensive research and the articles about the cabins of 747s of Pan Am. The configuration of the B747 (source: Pan Am Inflight-Service Handbook):
Image
 
Icaro
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 6:31 pm

Incredible series of articles. I enjoyed reading them a lot.
Thank you!
 
 
wernerga3
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 6:49 pm

PA91 wrote:
Image


THANK YOU! So per that sheet, the 122 (Ex-UA) planes were the ones in the South American Config:

N4703U Clipper Nautilus
N4704U Clipper Belle of The Sea
N4710U Clipper Sea Lark
N4711U Clipper Witch of The Wave
N4712U Clipper Tradewind

Having said that, this youtube video clearly shows a 100 (three windows on top) in the S.A. config which is different from what that sheet says
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pPfh4HlU5o

Watch at 7:18, and you will see the B-Zone first class- plus on the upper deck, there are clearly four rows on either side, but only three windows (not the 10 of the ex-UA planes). Were some of the ex-UA planes 3 window variants?
 
SmithAir747
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 7:12 pm

What configuration and cabin era was N739PA (Clipper Maid of the Seas) in at the time of the ill-fated PA103 flight? (It still had the blue cheatline and black Pan Am titles when it crashed.)

SmithAir747
I will praise thee; for I am fearfully and wonderfully made... (Psalm 139:14)
 
MR27122
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 7:31 pm

Fantastic & thorough work & effort! Terrific series of articles. Thank you for taking the time & making us all better informed!

One question---not of great relevance---why did Pan Am "re-name" planes? I understand why "Storm King" would be re-named, & why those with a reference to the Orient/Asia were ultimately changed (but, "Clipper Meteor" being renamed "Clipper Evening Star"? Why?). Additionally (correct me if I'm wrong)---the "Clipper" naming pattern was initially predicated upon Nautical references (Sky, Stars, Sea, etc)....however,it seems to have evolved to like "Spirit of..." & City names, etc. Did any rhyme or reason exist to the naming once it skewed away from the Nautical?
 
wernerga3
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 7:36 pm

SmithAir747 wrote:
What configuration and cabin era was N739PA (Clipper Maid of the Seas) in at the time of the ill-fated PA103 flight? (It still had the blue cheatline and black Pan Am titles when it crashed.)

SmithAir747


It was in the standard 100 configuration

Image
 
Transpac787
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 7:44 pm

wernerga3 wrote:
THANK YOU! So per that sheet, the 122 (Ex-UA) planes were the ones in the South American Config:

N4703U Clipper Nautilus
N4704U Clipper Belle of The Sea
N4710U Clipper Sea Lark
N4711U Clipper Witch of The Wave
N4712U Clipper Tradewind

Having said that, this youtube video clearly shows a 100 (three windows on top) in the S.A. config which is different from what that sheet says
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pPfh4HlU5o

Watch at 7:18, and you will see the B-Zone first class- plus on the upper deck, there are clearly four rows on either side, but only three windows (not the 10 of the ex-UA planes). Were some of the ex-UA planes 3 window variants?


At 0:22 when the photographer zooms in on the nose, you can see it's Clipper Beacon Light, which was N9674.... one of the ex-AA 747-123's. So, at some point, they were also South America configuration ships - seemingly reconfigured sometime between 1987 when the video was taken, and 1990 on the document shown above.

As for the upper deck.... AA's 747-123's had only 3 windows, but a different upper deck galley configuration than PanAm, that allowed them the 4 full rows of business class seats (or 3 rows of sleeper seats), as seen below:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-7ahJ3i5fxEA/T ... +83+03.jpg
 
wernerga3
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 8:03 pm

Transpac787 wrote:
wernerga3 wrote:
THANK YOU! So per that sheet, the 122 (Ex-UA) planes were the ones in the South American Config:

N4703U Clipper Nautilus
N4704U Clipper Belle of The Sea
N4710U Clipper Sea Lark
N4711U Clipper Witch of The Wave
N4712U Clipper Tradewind

Having said that, this youtube video clearly shows a 100 (three windows on top) in the S.A. config which is different from what that sheet says
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pPfh4HlU5o

Watch at 7:18, and you will see the B-Zone first class- plus on the upper deck, there are clearly four rows on either side, but only three windows (not the 10 of the ex-UA planes). Were some of the ex-UA planes 3 window variants?


At 0:22 when the photographer zooms in on the nose, you can see it's Clipper Beacon Light, which was N9674.... one of the ex-AA 747-123's. So, at some point, they were also South America configuration ships - seemingly reconfigured sometime between 1987 when the video was taken, and 1990 on the document shown above.

As for the upper deck.... AA's 747-123's had only 3 windows, but a different upper deck galley configuration than PanAm, that allowed them the 4 full rows of business class seats (or 3 rows of sleeper seats), as seen below:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-7ahJ3i5fxEA/T ... +83+03.jpg



So that further complicates things- Looks like the 122 and 123 planes were the ones in S.A. config even though that internal document said otherwise. Now you can see my research dismay..
 
DDR
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 02, 2019 11:38 pm

Well wernerga3, thank you for these great articles that you have written. They were great. I am sure many people enjoyed them very much lie I did. It is a little sad that this is the end.
 
PA91
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Fri May 03, 2019 7:42 am

Regarding the Boeing 747-123 Clipper Beacon Light (N9674) I would like to make some additions:
Having said that, this youtube video clearly shows a 100 (three windows on top) in the S.A. config which is different from what that sheet says
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7pPfh4HlU5o

The 747-123 had an original configuration of 30/46/330. Then they changed the layout into 45/48/280 which is shown in the video from 1987. They had even more First Class seats than the 747-122 (39/52/286) due to a slightly different configuration of First Class seats in B-Zone (left 5 rows, 3 rows in the middle [instead of 2 of the -122] and 4 rows on the righthand side (-122 had only 2). Upper Deck was 16 Clipper Class due to a different galley layout . In 1989 N9674 was converted for the Civil Reserve Air Fleet (CRAF) whereby a large cargo side cargo door was fitted along with a strengthened floor to allow military equipment to be loaded should it be required. Moreover, Pan Am removed the lower galley and returned the cargo pits to standard. With the cabin modification came a new layout of 21/46/366, which more or less resembled that of the Atlantic Fleet.
 
amc737
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Fri May 03, 2019 12:59 pm

Can I also say how much I have enjoyed these threads over the last 5 weeks. I did wonder what effect the CRAF conversations had on configurations. I concur with PA91 that the 747-123's ended up as Atlantic aircraft. Looking at old logs for August 1990 for Heathrow I found the following arrivals:

N9670 PA121 arrived from FRA
N9674 PA102 arrived from JFK

so by this point the -123's did appear in Europe. The -200's certainly did, I remember seeing N723PA China Clipper II at Heathrow lots although they mixed routes with -100's. LHR-LAX for example saw 100's & 200's.

Amc737
 
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DL_Mech
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Fri May 03, 2019 2:36 pm

I still see Pan Am coach seats in movies and TV to this day. We recently had an engine nose cowl shipped in a wooden box from the desert. What was used for transportation protection inside the box? Pan Am seat cushions.
This plane is built to withstand anything... except a bad pilot.
 
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DL_Mech
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Fri May 03, 2019 4:09 pm

Looks like an AA bulkhead at 7:58

http://youtu.be/7pPfh4HlU5o?t=478


Transpac787 wrote:

The 747-122 (ex-UA) and 747-123 (ex-AA) were both unique in that they were delivered with below-deck galleys, similar to concepts seen on DC10's and L1011's. The PanAm 747-121's, had the on-deck galleys, in order to maximize cargo space and revenue.

The "South American" configuration birds, while not explicitly depicted on the seat maps, had elevators in the galley units at doors 2LR and 4LR. That is, of course, why their galley space space shown on deck is much less than that of the other configuration.




Nice view of the galley lift doors here:

http://youtu.be/7pPfh4HlU5o?t=536
This plane is built to withstand anything... except a bad pilot.
 
wernerga3
Topic Author
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Fri May 03, 2019 5:30 pm

DL_Mech wrote:
Looks like an AA bulkhead at 7:58

http://youtu.be/7pPfh4HlU5o?t=478


Yeah the fuzzy cloud motifs!
 
Ryanair01
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Sat May 04, 2019 8:14 am

Thank you for such a wonderful series of posts.

I have these photos which I hope people will enjoy.

747 First Class

Image

Image

747 Main Cabin

1987-1989
Image

1989-1991
Image

Videos

Here are a couple of videos which show the last Atlantic configuration.

Fun crew video on a LHR-LAX flight
https://youtu.be/ZcK2avk3oiM

Clipper Juan Trippe - the last Pan Am 747 to be returned to the lessor from JFK in 1992
https://youtu.be/AJV30yyRoOc
 
Cody
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Joined: Tue May 18, 1999 12:16 pm

Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Sun May 05, 2019 2:58 am

Great research. Posts like yours are the reason I still visit airliners.net. I think you should do this again for another Pan Am aircraft type or for another airline all together.

I vote something with Eastern.
 
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PPVLC
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Sun May 05, 2019 11:25 pm

Excellent series of articles, I was dreading to reach the final one! I truly appreciate your effort and research and also the extra images brought by fellow a.netters, we all got united around a legendary time in aviation, the iconic Pan Am and their 747s. The very first 747 I saw was a Pan Am bird and I gawked in awe, thank you for bringing back so many memories.
Cabin crew L188 707 727 737 767 A300 DC10 MD11 777 747
 
Doublecatered
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Mon May 06, 2019 12:02 am

I'd also like to thank you for your informative and detailed post
Took me back to the good old days off aviation when I first started my career
I'm still hanging in there after 30 years. Your post really highlights the changes the industry has experienced.
 
sspontak
Posts: 577
Joined: Thu Aug 05, 2004 2:42 am

Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Mon May 06, 2019 2:15 am

Thank you so much on this excellent 5 article series. I enjoyed every one of them. I certainly learned a tremendous amount of information on the incredible Pan Am 747's. You did great work!
 
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AA777223
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 09, 2019 6:40 pm

Loved this series! I was a child in this era, so it is great to learn the history of an industry I love.

I think it would be fascinating to read something similar, like the history of the L-1011 at DL or the 777or 747 at UA.
A318/19/20/21, A300, A332/3, A343/6, A388, L1011, DC-9, DC-10, MD-11, MD-80, B722, B732/3/4/5/7/8/9, B743/4/4M, B752/3, B762/3/4, B772/E/W, B788/9, F-100, CRJ-200/700/900, ERJ-135/145/175/190, DH-8, ATR-72, DO-328, BAE-146
 
jupiter2
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Joined: Tue Jan 02, 2001 11:30 am

Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 09, 2019 7:14 pm

Transpac787 wrote:
wernerga3 wrote:

This may be true- but very illogical if so. If it was named after a South American city and primarily served it, I find it extremely hard to believe that the plane would be in a standard config as they were trying to pull additional first/clipper revenue out of these S.A. flights- similar to what they did on the SPs over the Pacific some 10 years earlier.


The naming of an aircraft did not indicate dedicated scheduling to that city/region. Even to that point, N730PA was renamed "Clipper Gem of the Ocean", and photos of it in the database show it in LHR, CDG, FRA, ZRH, etc. "Clipper New York", for instance, did not just strictly serve JFK flights, nor did "Clipper Moscow Express" only serve SVO.

By the by, I'm still unaware of any 747-212B, or any 747-200B at all for that matter, that was ever delivered with - nor modified to have - the below-deck galleys. N730PA, almost assuredly, was in the standard configuration.


The early delivery QF 238B's had lower deck galleys, I can remember riding the lift down to the galley as a kid during a tour of one. Not sure how long they lasted though.
 
wernerga3
Topic Author
Posts: 212
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Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 09, 2019 8:14 pm

AA777223 wrote:
Loved this series! I was a child in this era, so it is great to learn the history of an industry I love.

I think it would be fascinating to read something similar, like the history of the L-1011 at DL or the 777or 747 at UA.


I was thinking of doing a project on all of the original 747 order airlines' cabins. I have been researching them all anyway.
 
sspontak
Posts: 577
Joined: Thu Aug 05, 2004 2:42 am

Re: Pan Am 747 Cabin Era Article #5 | Final Era: One Last Effort at Capturing the Market by Following Trends (1987-1991)

Thu May 09, 2019 8:22 pm

wernerga3 wrote:
AA777223 wrote:
Loved this series! I was a child in this era, so it is great to learn the history of an industry I love.

I think it would be fascinating to read something similar, like the history of the L-1011 at DL or the 777or 747 at UA.


I was thinking of doing a project on all of the original 747 order airlines' cabins. I have been researching them all anyway.


The DL L-1011 history would be an interesting project. I also like your idea of the original 747 operators. Both would be very interesting projects. This is a great topic.

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