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enilria
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What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Tue May 14, 2019 10:26 pm

First, let me say, I have not recruited flight attendants. This is something I have observed at close distance, however, and I have been friends with several people who have been involved in the FA hiring/training process. I have also talked to the recruits in line, a line sometimes 300 deep, and also talked to many who walked away empty handed. I'm not going to get into whether being an FA is a good job or not. These are just my observations from a close distance.

MOST IMPORTANTLY: The #1 enemy of anybody doing flight attendant training and recruiting is ATTRITION. Depending on the airline and a lot of other factors attrition can be brutal with a new-hire class commonly completely gone in just 2.5 years. As a recruiter or a trainer that means doing the job twice in 5 years just to be neutral in staffing level. If the carrier is growing it is even more difficult just to keep up, so taking every possible step to avoid attrition is high on recruiter's goals and from a distance it appeared that recruiters who had a record of hiring short-time flight attendants got fired or otherwise did not have a good career path. Although the wages aren't much different than a waiter/waitress, unfortunately, the training is much more extensive, frequently taking 2 or 3 months. So, there is a huge cost to attrition for the airline.

What Not To Say: WNTS
What To Say: WTS

WNTS: I just want to do this for a few years and see the world.
WTS: I love travel.
WHY: This is true with any job, but because of the length of training NEVER say you have any intention of leaving.

WNTS: I wanted to see the world before settling down and starting a family.
WHY: Flight attendants make so little, that affording child care as a flight attendant is almost economically impossible. So few young female flight attendants came back from maternity leave that from a workforce planning perspective they just assumed in the staffing plan that they would never come back and if they did they were ahead of plan.

WNTS: I've never been anywhere.
WHY: This says to the recruiter that you have no idea what you are getting into in terms of the demands of travel. This is another red flag that you will do the job for 3 months and find out staying at hotels away from your family was a huge mistake.

WNTS: I've never flown/I flew in a plane as a kid.
WHY: Same as the previous one. You have no idea what you are getting into. Big risk you will leave quickly.
===============================================================================
WTS: My parent was a flight attendant.
WHY: This shows that you are very familiar with the rigors of being a flight attendant. This is a huge plus. Keep in mind if you aren't honest that they will probably ask questions about your parent's career. What airline? Where were they based. Who raised you while they were flying?

WTS: I know a flight attendant who is a good friend.
WHY: Same as the prior. It shows you have some idea what you are getting into.

WTS: I love to travel and I plan to use my flight benefits like crazy.
WHY: Since the pay is garbage many flight attendants stay working because they get addicted to the flight benefits. In fact, this is true of all airline employees. If this is a reason you are taking the job it implies greater longevity.

WTS: I was a flight attendant when I was younger.
WHY: Assuming this is true (because they will check) this is gold. Some of those flight attendants that leave to start a family come back later and when they do, they have on average much longer longevity. This is the real reason why passengers perceive flight attendants as getting older. It's not that they have been doing the job continuously for 30 years in many cases, it's because they came back 10-15 years later in many cases and the average longevity for an older flight attendant is much longer than a young flight attendant.

Be kind, just trying to help the newbies...
 
PlanesNTrains
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Tue May 14, 2019 10:38 pm

Good summary.
-Dave


MAX’d out on MAX threads. If you are starting a thread, and it’s about the MAX - stop. There’s already a thread that covers it.
 
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millionsofmiles
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Tue May 14, 2019 10:41 pm

Most of this could not be any more incorrect if you tried.

Leave the interviewing advice to those who know what they are talking about.

Next.
 
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enilria
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Tue May 14, 2019 10:48 pm

millionsofmiles wrote:
Most of this could not be any more incorrect if you tried.

Leave the interviewing advice to those who know what they are talking about.

Next.

Perhaps your airline has no flight attendant attrition problem. That’s not common.
 
WeatherPilot
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Tue May 14, 2019 10:52 pm

If flight attendants on tv shows have taught me anything it's that you can't make everyone happy so why bother to try.
 
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millionsofmiles
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Tue May 14, 2019 10:57 pm

enilria wrote:
millionsofmiles wrote:
Most of this could not be any more incorrect if you tried.

Leave the interviewing advice to those who know what they are talking about.

Next.

Perhaps your airline has no flight attendant attrition problem. That’s not common.


Observations from “a close distance” do not make you an expert.

If I were a prospective applicant, this is the last place I would come for advice. There is a VERY active Facebook page frequented by many recruiters along with hundreds of SUCCESSFUL flight attendants eager to provide assistance.
 
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enilria
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Tue May 14, 2019 11:49 pm

millionsofmiles wrote:
along with hundreds of SUCCESSFUL flight attendants eager to provide assistance.

This was from the recruiters perspective what to say, not the FAs. But basically your opinion is that Airliners.net should not be giving young future av industry people advice because there's Facebook for that? Well, that's an opinion.
 
BoeingGuy
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 12:05 am

millionsofmiles wrote:
Most of this could not be any more incorrect if you tried.

Leave the interviewing advice to those who know what they are talking about.

Next.


What exactly is incorrect? Can you please give some examples?
 
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Super80Fan
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 12:05 am

Interesting video on Frontier Airlines FA training, keeping in mind some of it is probably scripted and this is an old, old video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUsdnkqUSSA

Someone with F9 inside knowledge posted the fate of most of them, none of them are current F9 employees either quitting, being fired or in the case of the older lady (whom most people hated but funnily enough lasted the longest) retired.
RIP McDonnell Douglas
 
PlanesNTrains
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 12:17 am

BoeingGuy wrote:
millionsofmiles wrote:
Most of this could not be any more incorrect if you tried.

Leave the interviewing advice to those who know what they are talking about.

Next.


What exactly is incorrect? Can you please give some examples?


Just like on the railroad boards, it’s all opinion. Enilria’s list is probably valid for who he spoke with or what he witnessed. As always, ymmv. When I applied for a railroad job back in the 90’s, I generally followed the advice but felt like I stuck out like a sore thumb. No call back. Lol. Obviously the advice I followed didn’t match with the recruiter I interviewed with (or the group I was interviewing alongside of). Also, as someone who’s hired hundreds of people for my employer over the years, even I had my standards and “acceptables” vary based on market conditions, individual interviews, changes in the business rxpectations, changes in expectations of those up the chain, etc. On other words, use your best judgment going into the interview, reference suggestions such as this list, and accept the outcome.
-Dave


MAX’d out on MAX threads. If you are starting a thread, and it’s about the MAX - stop. There’s already a thread that covers it.
 
catiii
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 12:28 am

At my airline we do not exclude applicants who "never flew in a plane as a kid." If that's a "what not to say," your recruiters are dummies.
 
flyrocoak
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 12:33 am

catiii wrote:
At my airline we do not exclude applicants who "never flew in a plane as a kid." If that's a "what not to say," your recruiters are dummies.


But that statement certainly doesn't add value. Why say it?
 
LAXBUR
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 1:19 am

Some of the suggestions made are common sense. Some of the alleged responses by a potential employer are possibly discriminatory.

When possible I would start with an airline on the ground first then “graduate” to onboard.
 
OKCDCA
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 1:41 am

LAXBUR wrote:
Some of the suggestions made are common sense. Some of the alleged responses by a potential employer are possibly discriminatory.

When possible I would start with an airline on the ground first then “graduate” to onboard.

It’s only discriminatory if they ask a direct question regarding a protected class. If they ask an open ended question like “Where do you see yourself in 5 years,” and you say with two kids, a dog and a nice big happy family, that’s on you for offering it up. You essentially disqualified yourself for a position like FA.
 
BTV290
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 1:54 am

My suggestion is to focus on your ability to answer behavioural interview questions. At my airline, inflight hiring is so competitive, that they have to rely almost exclusively on the "scores" generated from the behavioural interviews for making hiring determinations, for reasons of legal safety. That being said, it leaves almost no room for candidates to be making statements like what you're suggesting--the good or the bad.
Search the internet for behavioural interview questions and make a roster of good multi-purpose stories you can tell, that showcase your ability to shine in high pressure, low consistency, customer-facing situations, and then be able to ram them into the STAR (Situation, Task, Action, Result) format. Putting up high points in interview formats like that, is how you get yourself hired.
 
UpNAWAy
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 2:05 am

I don't think my airline has much turnover at all and I think it's extremely hard to get past the interview process and actually start training.
 
9Patch
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 2:17 am

millionsofmiles wrote:
Most of this could not be any more incorrect if you tried.

Leave the interviewing advice to those who know what they are talking about.

Next.

Sorry. You have to be more specific.
What in your opinions incorrect and WHY?
Next.
 
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 2:23 am

flyrocoak wrote:
millionsofmiles wrote:
Most of this could not be any more incorrect if you tried.

Leave the interviewing advice to those who know what they are talking about.

Next.


Perhaps this reply was meant as sarcasm? No?

Because, frankly, this is good advice for any job applicant:
-sell your desire of longevity
-sell your knowledge of the job that you are seeking, and that you know what you are getting into, and that it's a good fit for you
-don't mention anything about pregnancy and maternity plans and goals or any other reason why you will be out of office for long periods of time
-sell that your eager

And that message is fine on any platform.


This. Those points work for any job interview.
RIP McDonnell Douglas
 
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PPVLC
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 2:25 am

I've been directly involved in the interview/hiring process and I can assure you it's the complete picture that matters; of course there are some clear signs that a candidate is not fit for the job and they might drop an occasional bomb during the interviews that can put them out of the game but, as I said before, it's not only about giving the right answers. A good candidate is someone pleasant to talk to, looks you in the eyes showing sincerity, attention and respect; they are never too much nor forgettable, a beautiful smile at the right time counts a lot, knowing how hard is the job is good too, good natural posture, voice, skin, even the way a candidate interacts with other candidates shows how good of a team player they can be.It's not only about knowing the right answers but how they behave when they don't know the answer to a question. A good candidate likes people and has a natural talent to deal with difficult situations and crisis management, empathy is the key. People can rehearse what they will say in an interview but there are things that can't be rehearsed and that's the point.
Cabin crew L188 707 727 737 767 A300 DC10 MD11 777 747
 
FlyHossD
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 2:37 am

Reading the OP, I was wondering if this might devolve into a parody.

Like: WNTS: I'm just here to meet my Tinder date.
My statements do not represent my former employer or my current employer and are my opinions only.
 
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 2:43 am

Best advice if you want to actually be happy and stick with the job: apply ONLY to airlines that have crew bases where you live or where you want to live.

Actually that should be the number one screener question for the recruiters: "HI, where do you live?" and "Do you have family you can stay with in X,Y,Z (where we have crew bases). If not, then NEXT because the job is not worth it if you have to live in a crashpad away from home and you will most likely quit.
 
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 2:47 am

Please, enlighten us.
Is just me, or is flying not as much fun anymore?
 
9w748capt
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 2:54 am

Fascinating post. As someone commented above, I wish those posters who disagree with Enilria would offer some actual substance in their response. I know what kinds of things we vet in my field, so I'm always interested to know how things work elsewhere.
 
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 3:00 am

Super80Fan wrote:
flyrocoak wrote:
millionsofmiles wrote:
Most of this could not be any more incorrect if you tried.

Leave the interviewing advice to those who know what they are talking about.

Next.


Perhaps this reply was meant as sarcasm? No?

Because, frankly, this is good advice for any job applicant:
-sell your desire of longevity
-sell your knowledge of the job that you are seeking, and that you know what you are getting into, and that it's a good fit for you
-don't mention anything about pregnancy and maternity plans and goals or any other reason why you will be out of office for long periods of time
-sell that your eager

And that message is fine on any platform.


This. Those points work for any job interview.



Not necessarily. Showing too much eagerness and excitement is a often a fast track to the discard pile.

Most important, know why you're there. Show you understand the nature of the job description and you're not making it more to be than what's listed in the posting. You're coming in at such and such position and at such and such level in an organization - you're not organically beyond that and don't talk as if you are and don't inquire about topics which will be above your assigned duties.

The reason for your potential hiring is to provide them and the team and the company with a solution to a staffing and performance problem or shortcoming. They want to hear how you are the solution. It's not about being a good fit for you. It's about being a good fit for them and said company achieving the solutions they need.

Hiring managers don't want to hear about your long term plans for the position or for yourself personally or how you wish to grow and move up in the company. Hiring managers don't want to hear how you are coming for their job, they want to see you are a potential piece of their team so as they move up or are afforded opportunities you come with them as part of that team in terms of projects, career advancement, or other opportunities with other companies.

Personal details should be minimal. If you're in the area and looking for work because you've moved back home or you're getting married and relocating to the area, keep the answers there. Trying to leverage a death in the family, a marriage, a graduation, a job loss, or anything else to gain sympathy or favor will most often backfire on you. As a hiring manager, your future wife, husband, or child means jack squat to me and will probably just get in the way of you being 100%.

A job candidate should be asking 40-50% of the questions during the job interview. The interviewer(s) want(s) to be as engaged in the conversation as you are. Eliminate words from the speech such as "like" and "literally" and "uh," etc. etc. Never, ever ever take out your cell phone - turn it off before entering the building, sit up straight in the waiting room, and if you're offered a beverage, take it.
if assumptions could fly, airliners.net would be the world's busiest airport
 
F9Animal
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 3:14 am

enilria wrote:
First, let me say, I have not recruited flight attendants. This is something I have observed at close distance, however, and I have been friends with several people who have been involved in the FA hiring/training process. I have also talked to the recruits in line, a line sometimes 300 deep, and also talked to many who walked away empty handed. I'm not going to get into whether being an FA is a good job or not. These are just my observations from a close distance.

MOST IMPORTANTLY: The #1 enemy of anybody doing flight attendant training and recruiting is ATTRITION. Depending on the airline and a lot of other factors attrition can be brutal with a new-hire class commonly completely gone in just 2.5 years. As a recruiter or a trainer that means doing the job twice in 5 years just to be neutral in staffing level. If the carrier is growing it is even more difficult just to keep up, so taking every possible step to avoid attrition is high on recruiter's goals and from a distance it appeared that recruiters who had a record of hiring short-time flight attendants got fired or otherwise did not have a good career path. Although the wages aren't much different than a waiter/waitress, unfortunately, the training is much more extensive, frequently taking 2 or 3 months. So, there is a huge cost to attrition for the airline.

What Not To Say: WNTS
What To Say: WTS

WNTS: I just want to do this for a few years and see the world.
WTS: I love travel.
WHY: This is true with any job, but because of the length of training NEVER say you have any intention of leaving.

WNTS: I wanted to see the world before settling down and starting a family.
WHY: Flight attendants make so little, that affording child care as a flight attendant is almost economically impossible. So few young female flight attendants came back from maternity leave that from a workforce planning perspective they just assumed in the staffing plan that they would never come back and if they did they were ahead of plan.

WNTS: I've never been anywhere.
WHY: This says to the recruiter that you have no idea what you are getting into in terms of the demands of travel. This is another red flag that you will do the job for 3 months and find out staying at hotels away from your family was a huge mistake.

WNTS: I've never flown/I flew in a plane as a kid.
WHY: Same as the previous one. You have no idea what you are getting into. Big risk you will leave quickly.
===============================================================================
WTS: My parent was a flight attendant.
WHY: This shows that you are very familiar with the rigors of being a flight attendant. This is a huge plus. Keep in mind if you aren't honest that they will probably ask questions about your parent's career. What airline? Where were they based. Who raised you while they were flying?

WTS: I know a flight attendant who is a good friend.
WHY: Same as the prior. It shows you have some idea what you are getting into.

WTS: I love to travel and I plan to use my flight benefits like crazy.
WHY: Since the pay is garbage many flight attendants stay working because they get addicted to the flight benefits. In fact, this is true of all airline employees. If this is a reason you are taking the job it implies greater longevity.

WTS: I was a flight attendant when I was younger.
WHY: Assuming this is true (because they will check) this is gold. Some of those flight attendants that leave to start a family come back later and when they do, they have on average much longer longevity. This is the real reason why passengers perceive flight attendants as getting older. It's not that they have been doing the job continuously for 30 years in many cases, it's because they came back 10-15 years later in many cases and the average longevity for an older flight attendant is much longer than a young flight attendant.

Be kind, just trying to help the newbies...


I think this is really good info, and worthy of responses. While some may not agree with this, I think it hits a good area of what to bring to an interview.
I Am A Different Animal!!
 
9w748capt
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 3:35 am

stlgph wrote:
Super80Fan wrote:
flyrocoak wrote:

Perhaps this reply was meant as sarcasm? No?

Because, frankly, this is good advice for any job applicant:
-sell your desire of longevity
-sell your knowledge of the job that you are seeking, and that you know what you are getting into, and that it's a good fit for you
-don't mention anything about pregnancy and maternity plans and goals or any other reason why you will be out of office for long periods of time
-sell that your eager

And that message is fine on any platform.


This. Those points work for any job interview.



Not necessarily. Showing too much eagerness and excitement is a often a fast track to the discard pile.

Most important, know why you're there. Show you understand the nature of the job description and you're not making it more to be than what's listed in the posting. You're coming in at such and such position and at such and such level in an organization - you're not organically beyond that and don't talk as if you are and don't inquire about topics which will be above your assigned duties.

The reason for your potential hiring is to provide them and the team and the company with a solution to a staffing and performance problem or shortcoming. They want to hear how you are the solution. It's not about being a good fit for you. It's about being a good fit for them and said company achieving the solutions they need.

Hiring managers don't want to hear about your long term plans for the position or for yourself personally or how you wish to grow and move up in the company. Hiring managers don't want to hear how you are coming for their job, they want to see you are a potential piece of their team so as they move up or are afforded opportunities you come with them as part of that team in terms of projects, career advancement, or other opportunities with other companies.

Personal details should be minimal. If you're in the area and looking for work because you've moved back home or you're getting married and relocating to the area, keep the answers there. Trying to leverage a death in the family, a marriage, a graduation, a job loss, or anything else to gain sympathy or favor will most often backfire on you. As a hiring manager, your future wife, husband, or child means jack squat to me and will probably just get in the way of you being 100%.

A job candidate should be asking 40-50% of the questions during the job interview. The interviewer(s) want(s) to be as engaged in the conversation as you are. Eliminate words from the speech such as "like" and "literally" and "uh," etc. etc. Never, ever ever take out your cell phone - turn it off before entering the building, sit up straight in the waiting room, and if you're offered a beverage, take it.


A candidate should be asking half the questions? Is this for real? Who knows, maybe it works this way in other industries. Certainly not mine.

And what if I decline a beverage? I have to pee more when I'm nervous, so why would I want to drink more and potentially have to pee at an inopportune time?
 
SocalApproach
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 3:54 am

Ironically most interviewers would tell you right away they dont want to hear you like to travel. All you need to do in a FA interview is dress appropriate, make it clear you understand the lifestyle of a flight attendant like How everything is seniority based and show you like working with other people as a team because you are in a confined space without any help from an immediate person in charge at 35000 feet. Everything else is just a crapshoot in my opinion (random personality assessments, group interview where not everyone excels at but others have mastered which isnt the best predictive way to show how someone interacts as a team player)

I could argue other things here such as saying you were a FA when you were younger is not a good idea either. If they ask then lying isnt encouraged but Flight attendant training differs from airline to airline and its hard to forget what you learned at X airline and be trained to do something differently now at your new airline. They know bad habits get formed and I would think the new airline wants to mold you into what they want.

You have a friend who currently works there as a Flight Attendant? Well I wouldn't say that either unless you know for sure your friend is always getting FA of the month or something. I know some friends who are flight attendants and although my friends I would never associate myself with them at an interview but thats only because I know the real story. FMLA is all I am going to say about that. Plenty of threads here on A.net explaining FMLA issues with cabin crews.

At the end of the day just control what you can control such as showing up on time, mingling with other canidates, stressing knowledge of lifestyle and dress conservative for the interview. STAR method if you get a one on one interview. Its the things you cant control which cause people to not get FA positions in my opinion
 
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 4:03 am

Could we please just debate the topic and keep personal comments towards other users out of the discussion
Forum Moderator
 
grbauc
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 4:19 am

millionsofmiles wrote:
enilria wrote:
millionsofmiles wrote:
Most of this could not be any more incorrect if you tried.

Leave the interviewing advice to those who know what they are talking about.

Next.

Perhaps your airline has no flight attendant attrition problem. That’s not common.


Observations from “a close distance” do not make you an expert.

If I were a prospective applicant, this is the last place I would come for advice. There is a VERY active Facebook page frequented by many recruiters along with hundreds of SUCCESSFUL flight attendants eager to provide assistance.



What he's saying is pretty common sense stuff. This is a aviation fan site and nothing he points out is outrageous. Instead of attacking what you don't like maybe a better approach is to provide some links to provide assistance.

Thanks eniria for the tread.
 
rbavfan
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 4:23 am

millionsofmiles wrote:
enilria wrote:
millionsofmiles wrote:
Most of this could not be any more incorrect if you tried.

Leave the interviewing advice to those who know what they are talking about.

Next.

Perhaps your airline has no flight attendant attrition problem. That’s not common.


Observations from “a close distance” do not make you an expert.

If I were a prospective applicant, this is the last place I would come for advice. There is a VERY active Facebook page frequented by many recruiters along with hundreds of SUCCESSFUL flight attendants eager to provide assistance.


What is the facebook page. Would be interesting to compare notes with FA's I know.
 
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 4:32 am

stlgph wrote:
Super80Fan wrote:
flyrocoak wrote:

Perhaps this reply was meant as sarcasm? No?

Because, frankly, this is good advice for any job applicant:
-sell your desire of longevity
-sell your knowledge of the job that you are seeking, and that you know what you are getting into, and that it's a good fit for you
-don't mention anything about pregnancy and maternity plans and goals or any other reason why you will be out of office for long periods of time
-sell that your eager

And that message is fine on any platform.


This. Those points work for any job interview.



Not necessarily. Showing too much eagerness and excitement is a often a fast track to the discard pile.

Most important, know why you're there. Show you understand the nature of the job description and you're not making it more to be than what's listed in the posting. You're coming in at such and such position and at such and such level in an organization - you're not organically beyond that and don't talk as if you are and don't inquire about topics which will be above your assigned duties.

The reason for your potential hiring is to provide them and the team and the company with a solution to a staffing and performance problem or shortcoming. They want to hear how you are the solution. It's not about being a good fit for you. It's about being a good fit for them and said company achieving the solutions they need.

Hiring managers don't want to hear about your long term plans for the position or for yourself personally or how you wish to grow and move up in the company. Hiring managers don't want to hear how you are coming for their job, they want to see you are a potential piece of their team so as they move up or are afforded opportunities you come with them as part of that team in terms of projects, career advancement, or other opportunities with other companies.

Personal details should be minimal. If you're in the area and looking for work because you've moved back home or you're getting married and relocating to the area, keep the answers there. Trying to leverage a death in the family, a marriage, a graduation, a job loss, or anything else to gain sympathy or favor will most often backfire on you. As a hiring manager, your future wife, husband, or child means jack squat to me and will probably just get in the way of you being 100%.

A job candidate should be asking 40-50% of the questions during the job interview. The interviewer(s) want(s) to be as engaged in the conversation as you are. Eliminate words from the speech such as "like" and "literally" and "uh," etc. etc. Never, ever ever take out your cell phone - turn it off before entering the building, sit up straight in the waiting room, and if you're offered a beverage, take it.


Those are some good points but really it comes down to whatever the specific job/industry wants to hear. Hiring managers DO want you learn about your long term goals because if you make it clear to them you are only going to be at the job for a few months when they want someone in it for the long run, you aren't going to get hired. Companies certainly want someone who can help them with a deficiency they have/how you can help the company but at the same time you have to be a good fit with the company culture as well. They don't want to hire someone with completely different values from the company only to hire you and for everyone including yourself be very miserable.

You don't want to be overly eager to the point it becomes fake/creepy but showing enthusiasm and knowledge of the company and specific job description shows you did your research and are serious about the position, not just interviewing for the heck of it.
RIP McDonnell Douglas
 
26point2
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 4:40 am

Interesting story but begs a question: If one is truly passionate about their career then why the contrived answers? The correct answers will be easy for any applicant who’s genuine. You don’t need a coach.
 
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millionsofmiles
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 5:36 am

26point2 wrote:
Interesting story but begs a question: If one is truly passionate about their career then why the contrived answers? The correct answers will be easy for any applicant who’s genuine. You don’t need a coach.


The contrived answers posted here are NOT needed. It’s called common sense; putting your best foot forward; and hoping your manner comports with what the interviewer is looking for.
 
FlyingColours
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 8:42 am

$2000 a month anywhere I would imagine is basically a poverty wage. $24,000 annually? Yikes!!!


Perhaps in the USA but in the UK £24,000 would be a very good wage, however don't forget that the difference in exchange rates mean that currently on today's (rather poor rate of 1.29) £24,000 works out at $31,004.40...

An employee in the UK earning minimum wage will roughly take home £11,000 which isn't enough to survive on (rent/mortgage/bills/transportation costs), that comes in at $14,000... Minimum wage has just gone up however, so things are improving however the prices of everything go up alongside it :/

Phil
FlyingColours
Lifes a train racing towards you, now you can either run away or grab a chair & a beer and watch it come - Phil
 
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airportugal310
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 8:54 am

FlyingColours wrote:
$2000 a month anywhere I would imagine is basically a poverty wage. $24,000 annually? Yikes!!!


Perhaps in the USA but in the UK £24,000 would be a very good wage, however don't forget that the difference in exchange rates mean that currently on today's (rather poor rate of 1.29) £24,000 works out at $31,004.40...

An employee in the UK earning minimum wage will roughly take home £11,000 which isn't enough to survive on (rent/mortgage/bills/transportation costs), that comes in at $14,000... Minimum wage has just gone up however, so things are improving however the prices of everything go up alongside it :/

Phil
FlyingColours


Wow that is very interesting to know...thanks for the insight. In most US locations, that same amount annually would not even (or very barely) cover rent/mortgage, let alone money for anything extra.
I sell airplanes and airplane accessories
 
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Coal
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 9:43 am

enilria wrote:
WNTS: I just want to do this for a few years and see the world.
WTS: I love travel.
WHY: This is true with any job, but because of the length of training NEVER say you have any intention of leaving.

There are many jobs / careers in which it is more than fine and almost expected to say you only want to do it for a few years, e.g. consulting, i-banking, PE, VC, etc.
Nxt Flts: SQ SIN-MNL-SIN | SQ SIN-BKK-SIN | DL SIN-NRT-SIN | LH SIN-MUC-SIN
 
User001
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 9:47 am

Why was my post deleted? Doesn’t seem to be any explanation provided as to its deletion. It definatly posted as I had notification to say someone quoted it!?
 
chimborazo
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 10:08 am

What are your strengths?

Well... firstly I am physically incapable of lying.

Really?

No

And what would you say is a weakness of your’s?

Short Thai women.
 
thesaladdays
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 10:37 am

WNTS: Also, we're out of coffee.
 
jmmadrid
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 11:17 am

I know I'm swimming upstream here, but I believe that if a company wants to attract and retain talented and committed staff, they need to get to know their people better, their circumstances, their needs and their wishes, and work out creative win-win solutions. For example, a young mother might find it very convenient to fly short haul on weekends only, so that her partner can look after the child(ren). This is not necesarily bad, because you need some people working on weekends too and you have others who would appreciate a weekend off. You could negotiate with the mother from above one or two long hauls per month, and she will probably accept them. What is silly is to pretend that all your candidates/employees are perfect and live perfect lives.
 
Miamiairport
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 11:51 am

IIRC years ago WN said they reject potential FA candidates when they say they want the job because of travel (which is why I suspect why so many FAs over the years get bitter and indifferent). The best thing a candidate can do is fully understand and be willing to take the special commitment of the job (like working on Christmas, working on Saturday night when all your friends are out at the clubs, and sitting around for hours on a delay for which you are not paid for that time), dress well, act professionally and answer questions honestly. My advise to candidates for any job interview is never be overly specific about future career or life plans as a. you never know how the recruiter might take your answer and b. plans have a way of changing along the way.
 
wexfordflyer
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 11:54 am

BTV290 wrote:
My suggestion is to focus on your ability to answer behavioural interview questions. At my airline, inflight hiring is so competitive, that they have to rely almost exclusively on the "scores" generated from the behavioural interviews for making hiring determinations, for reasons of legal safety. That being said, it leaves almost no room for candidates to be making statements like what you're suggesting--the good or the bad.
Search the internet for behavioural interview questions and make a roster of good multi-purpose stories you can tell, that showcase your ability to shine in high pressure, low consistency, customer-facing situations, and then be able to ram them into the STAR (Situation, Task, Action, Result) format. Putting up high points in interview formats like that, is how you get yourself hired.


Excellently put! The STAR model is tried and tested and works. It makes it easy for you to show a recruiter why you are the right person for a job, and gives little room for disqualifying yourself, if used correctly.
Come with me, there's a place I want you to see, where the leaves are dark, I've got a hiding place in central park.
 
BravoEcho757
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 12:28 pm

I worked for a major carrier for a few years as a ramper and met many a different person in the industry. One of my dearest friends to this day started around the same time as a inflight crewmember and moved up through the years and now works at HQ as a inflight recruiter. As I travelled with my new job I'd always make a point to try and meet up when I had meetings in the city where she worked. I'll never forget the one dinner we had where I asked her about her new position and how it was treating her. She loved it and said many interesting things about the hiring process that most people don't know and I found it interesting. When I asked her who the airline was looking for in a perfect candidate her response resonated with me and I still think about it every time I fly.

"I'm looking for someone that is 100% able to evacuate a airplane in less than 90 second with half the exits blocked. Everything else like looks and smiles are a distant second for me".
 
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spinotter
Posts: 429
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 3:03 pm

millionsofmiles wrote:
Most of this could not be any more incorrect if you tried.

Leave the interviewing advice to those who know what they are talking about.

Next.


That is a pretty brutal reply. Without any details on why this is so incorrect.
 
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Aesma
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 4:46 pm

catiii wrote:
At my airline we do not exclude applicants who "never flew in a plane as a kid." If that's a "what not to say," your recruiters are dummies.


That's not what he said. He said "I flew as a kid" in the sense "I have only flown when I was a kid". So as an adult they have no idea of what it's like.
New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
 
Miamiairport
Posts: 172
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 4:59 pm

I don't think saying whether you "flew as a kid" or not really matters and per se probably should not be said by the applicant. What the applicant needs to convey is that they understand the job of flight attendant is not all fun and games, flying around the world and staying in hotels on the airline's dime. It's hard demanding work with long hours (many not paid) and with every flight the FA needs to be fully ready to manage any emergency from anything from a sick passenger to a water landing. The applicant should exude poise, professionals, empathy, compassion, tenacity, dedication, etc. Not when I was 12 I flew with my parents to Florida and it "was so cool."
 
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FLIHGH
Posts: 248
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 6:28 pm

Miamiairport wrote:
I don't think saying whether you "flew as a kid" or not really matters and per se probably should not be said by the applicant. What the applicant needs to convey is that they understand the job of flight attendant is not all fun and games, flying around the world and staying in hotels on the airline's dime. It's hard demanding work with long hours (many not paid) and with every flight the FA needs to be fully ready to manage any emergency from anything from a sick passenger to a water landing. The applicant should exude poise, professionals, empathy, compassion, tenacity, dedication, etc. Not when I was 12 I flew with my parents to Florida and it "was so cool."


I worked with a flight attendant whose first ever time on an airplane was the first day he showed up to work.

I've also worked with many flight attendants who were FA's back in the day for airlines such as Pan Am, Delta, Aer Lingus, then took time off and away from the industry...and now cannot get rehired at any of the non-regional airlines.
 
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readytotaxi
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 6:30 pm

"I suffer from flight sickness."
you don't get a second chance to make a first impression!
Growing older, but not up.
 
YULACYYZ
Posts: 22
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 6:35 pm

WeatherPilot wrote:
If flight attendants on tv shows have taught me anything it's that you can't make everyone happy so why bother to try.


No, you try and do whatever you can to please people, not only because it is your job, but because you love it!

The responses, whether positives or negatives are not that important. Trying to change human's behaviours IS a waste of your time. Most of the times they are mad at the airlines, not you. And we are very quick these days to take things so personally and get on the defensive. Many issues are airlines created ones and it is the way that we are responding that is making a difference.

But in the end, you walked away feeling that you did great!

Happy flying!
 
ITSTours
Posts: 159
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Re: What (Not) to Say When Interviewing to Be a Flight Attendant

Wed May 15, 2019 6:39 pm

It is interesting to see people here regarding FA as a low-paying job. (Which is, well, certainly true.)

In the East Asian countries, it is actually one of the middle-to-high-paying jobs especially for women. I guess the competition is much stronger there.

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