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Re: Why does BA (and others) decide to use 20+ year old planes on specific popular routes?

Posted: Wed Jun 12, 2019 11:33 pm
by gunnerman
Some years go when oil prices were over US$100 a barrel and BA was in dire straits, BA withdrew several 744s from service. Two were broken up for spares at Cardiff and a number sent into desert storage. However increased demand and a fall in oil prices made it sensible to bring some of the 744s back into service even though they are four holers.

Re: Why does BA (and others) decide to use 20+ year old planes on specific popular routes?

Posted: Sun Jun 16, 2019 4:06 am
by Gregd75
I always assumed it was due to competition (except LHR- JFK) I imagine if there’s little competition, then passengers would fly your plane regardless of age and the state of the cabin, but onc a competitor puts a new plane on the same route then the airline can respond by putting a better product on the route, trying to keep their passengers with the new, fresh, superior product (that’s what *they* say, not me)

So, the less competition, the less need to have your newest planes flying. The more the competition the more the need to have a competitive product.

It’s just a theory, no hard facts- but it’s what I’d do as an armchair CEO

Re: Why does BA (and others) decide to use 20+ year old planes on specific popular routes?

Posted: Sun Jun 16, 2019 10:31 am
by aerorobnz
The old 777s, for example, had reduced range, therefore they are better on shorter routes like LHR-DXB, LHR-BOS etc. Also, the savings on fuel burn are increased the longer the sector you are flying.

Re: Why does BA (and others) decide to use 20+ year old planes on specific popular routes?

Posted: Sun Jun 16, 2019 11:02 am
by dredgy
Airbus747 wrote:
I understand about retrofitting, and I understand about the majority of passengers not caring about all the fine details. But what about those who pay for Business and First class? Aren't they usually attracted with the latest bells and whistles?


Nobody flying on BA in business has lofty expectations.