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IAmGaroott
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747 Classic B Variants

Thu Jun 13, 2019 3:27 pm

Every spec sheet I’ve seen on the VC-25 aircraft refers to them as a “heavily modified 747-200B”.

Upon further research, the only information I’ve found about the “B” designation is on the -100 and it refers to a MTOW increase.

My questions are: does the B just signify an increased MTOW, was there a non-B version of the 742, and why did Boeing not make B variants of the -300 and -400 (or did they)?
 
IWMBH
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Thu Jun 13, 2019 3:47 pm

I thought the -200 was simply an “ER” version of the -100. The -200B was the type that besides the extra range had also a longer upper deck to house more passengers.
 
MO11
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Thu Jun 13, 2019 3:48 pm

IAmGaroott wrote:
Every spec sheet I’ve seen on the VC-25 aircraft refers to them as a “heavily modified 747-200B”.

Upon further research, the only information I’ve found about the “B” designation is on the -100 and it refers to a MTOW increase.

My questions are: does the B just signify an increased MTOW, was there a non-B version of the 742, and why did Boeing not make B variants of the -300 and -400 (or did they)?


A -100B is a higher gross weight -100. Series -200 comes in either -200B, -200C, or -200F. There is no non-suffixed -200; the question might rather be whether Boeing had originally intended to offer a -200, but instead elected to make the -200B the basic version.
 
IAmGaroott
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Thu Jun 13, 2019 3:49 pm

IWMBH wrote:
I thought the -200 was simply an “ER” version of the -100. The -200B was the type that besides the extra range had also a longer upper deck to house more passengers.


It was my understanding the upper decks of the -100 and -200 had the same surface area, but the latter had more windows. The -300 was the first lengthened upper deck.
 
IAmGaroott
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Thu Jun 13, 2019 3:51 pm

MO11 wrote:
IAmGaroott wrote:
Every spec sheet I’ve seen on the VC-25 aircraft refers to them as a “heavily modified 747-200B”.

Upon further research, the only information I’ve found about the “B” designation is on the -100 and it refers to a MTOW increase.

My questions are: does the B just signify an increased MTOW, was there a non-B version of the 742, and why did Boeing not make B variants of the -300 and -400 (or did they)?


A -100B is a higher gross weight -100. Series -200 comes in either -200B, -200C, or -200F. There is no non-suffixed -200; the question might rather be whether Boeing had originally intended to offer a -200, but instead elected to make the -200B the basic version.



Ahh! Thank you for clearing that up.
 
Prost
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Thu Jun 13, 2019 3:53 pm

I believe KLM stretched the upper deck of some of their -200s.
 
IWMBH
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Thu Jun 13, 2019 3:55 pm

IAmGaroott wrote:
IWMBH wrote:
I thought the -200 was simply an “ER” version of the -100. The -200B was the type that besides the extra range had also a longer upper deck to house more passengers.


It was my understanding the upper decks of the -100 and -200 had the same surface area, but the latter had more windows. The -300 was the first lengthened upper deck.


I did a little research and this is correct, it just looks longer. There where some ‘SUD’ versions of the -200’s, these had also the longer upper deck retrofitted after being in service for some time. KLM operated some of these.
 
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DarkSnowyNight
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Thu Jun 13, 2019 4:00 pm

IWMBH wrote:
IAmGaroott wrote:
IWMBH wrote:
I thought the -200 was simply an “ER” version of the -100. The -200B was the type that besides the extra range had also a longer upper deck to house more passengers.


It was my understanding the upper decks of the -100 and -200 had the same surface area, but the latter had more windows. The -300 was the first lengthened upper deck.


I did a little research and this is correct, it just looks longer. There where some ‘SUD’ versions of the -200’s, these had also the longer upper deck retrofitted after being in service for some time. KLM operated some of these.


And there were JAL -146Ds that also had this modification.

As for the windows thing, the 200 having more (10) is only a general guideline. Most 200s did. But some did actually come with just the three. As well, most -100s came with just the three, but most were eventually converted to the 10 window layout, if not converted to -F models first.
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factsonly
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Thu Jun 13, 2019 4:58 pm

In February 1971, KLM was the first airline to accept delivery of a B747-206B.
All earlier B747s deliveries had been B747-100's.

The first six Pratt&Whitney powered KLM B747-206B were delivery with just 3x upper deck windows.

Image

Later KLM ordered more B747-206B's with more powerful GE engines, these were delivered with 10x upperdeck windows.
These more powerful B747-200's were later converted to B747-200SUD with a stretched upperdeck.

KLM also ordered B747-300's and B747-400s.
 
IWMBH
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Thu Jun 13, 2019 6:15 pm

factsonly wrote:
In February 1971, KLM was the first airline to accept delivery of a B747-206B.
All earlier B747s deliveries had been B747-100's.

The first six Pratt&Whitney powered KLM B747-206B were delivery with just 3x upper deck windows.

Image

Later KLM ordered more B747-206B's with more powerful GE engines, these were delivered with 10x upperdeck windows.
These more powerful B747-200's were later converted to B747-200SUD with a stretched upperdeck.

KLM also ordered B747-300's and B747-400s.


Wasn’t NWA the first airline to receive the -200B? Anyway, weird the first 747 KL received was PH-BUA wasn’t it? This planes had 10 upper deck windows on the pictures on planespotters.net, where these later refurbished?
 
factsonly
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Thu Jun 13, 2019 8:02 pm

IWMBH wrote:

Wasn’t NWA the first airline to receive the -200B? Anyway, weird the first 747 KL received was PH-BUA wasn’t it? This planes had 10 upper deck windows on the pictures on planespotters.net, where these later refurbished?


Here are the delivery dates of the first B747-200:

- PH-BUA Boeing 747-206 KLM Royal Dutch Airlines DELIVERY: Jan 1971 4x PW JT9D Mississippi / The Mississippi
- N611US Boeing 747-200 Northwest Airlines DELIVERY: Mar 1971 4x PW JT9D

And indeed KLM converted the P&W powered B747-206B upperdecks from 3x to 8-10x windows, when the First Class lounges were deleted:

Image
 
IAmGaroott
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Thu Jun 13, 2019 8:24 pm

IWMBH wrote:
IAmGaroott wrote:
IWMBH wrote:
I thought the -200 was simply an “ER” version of the -100. The -200B was the type that besides the extra range had also a longer upper deck to house more passengers.


It was my understanding the upper decks of the -100 and -200 had the same surface area, but the latter had more windows. The -300 was the first lengthened upper deck.


I did a little research and this is correct, it just looks longer. There where some ‘SUD’ versions of the -200’s, these had also the longer upper deck retrofitted after being in service for some time. KLM operated some of these.


I was reading a thread from 2004 that stated a 742sud was essentially a 743. There were no performance nor mechanical differences.
 
LH707330
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:24 pm

IAmGaroott wrote:
IWMBH wrote:
IAmGaroott wrote:

It was my understanding the upper decks of the -100 and -200 had the same surface area, but the latter had more windows. The -300 was the first lengthened upper deck.


I did a little research and this is correct, it just looks longer. There where some ‘SUD’ versions of the -200’s, these had also the longer upper deck retrofitted after being in service for some time. KLM operated some of these.


I was reading a thread from 2004 that stated a 742sud was essentially a 743. There were no performance nor mechanical differences.

Similar to the earlier 743, yes. Later 743s had the option of the CF6-80C2 and the new WBF from the 400, but KLM ordered theirs with the CF6-50 for similarity with their 742BSUD.
 
IWMBH
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:42 pm

What is the reason that only KLM, UTA and JAL decided to convert their -200B’s? Wasn’t it efficient?
 
TW870
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Thu Jun 13, 2019 10:16 pm

747B was a designation first used in the late-1960s to market increase gross weight versions of the 747. There were to be passenger 747Bs, Convertible freighters, and pure freighter 747Bs. Here is a 2-page magazine ad for the convertible and freighter versions of the 747B for sale on EBay from 1969:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/BOEING-AIRCRAF ... 2284398008

No airplane ever flew designated as a 747B. Instead, this version got the name 747-200B. As others said, there was not a standard -200, just the -200B. It raises the question if there were ever marketing materials for a "747A". I am not sure when they decided to call the early models the -100.

There was no real rule for Boeing for series designations. Early 707s were 707-100s (Pan Am got 707-121s for example). Early 727s were just 727s. No series at all. Northwest got 727-51s, for example. They didn't get a series until after the -200s went on the market. Later deliveries did become 727-100s. 720s were -000 series. In other words, Eastern got 720-025s. Bottom line is there was no standard system, and the 747 is the only airplane that had an increase gross weight version marketed as a "B".
 
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longhauler
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Thu Jun 13, 2019 10:25 pm

IAmGaroott wrote:
IWMBH wrote:
I thought the -200 was simply an “ER” version of the -100. The -200B was the type that besides the extra range had also a longer upper deck to house more passengers.


It was my understanding the upper decks of the -100 and -200 had the same surface area, but the latter had more windows. The -300 was the first lengthened upper deck.

The lengthening of the upper deck of the -100s and -200s (yes it was both) was internal. It added a few feet to the length of the upper deck into the crown area behind the original lounge. Normally a galley was placed there. A lot were done at the factory before delivery, some were done after.

The external visual clues are as noted. Namely the increase of windows over the original three, as well as a second emergency exit was added at the front of the cabin on the left side. This extra exit was required if more than 16 seats were placed up there and all of this was happening as First Class lounges were being removed in favour of revenue seats.

At Air Canada, it was either 16 or 30 Y seats depending on whether the conversion was done.
Last edited by longhauler on Thu Jun 13, 2019 10:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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na
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Thu Jun 13, 2019 10:27 pm

factsonly wrote:
Here are the delivery dates of the first B747-200:
- PH-BUA Boeing 747-206 KLM Royal Dutch Airlines DELIVERY: Jan 1971 4x PW JT9D Mississippi / The Mississippi
- N611US Boeing 747-200 Northwest Airlines DELIVERY: Mar 1971 4x PW JT9D


N611US however was the first built and first flying 747-200B, line-no.88, only delivered later due to being used for test flights first. PH-BUA was line-no. 96.
 
justplanesmart
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Fri Jun 14, 2019 4:44 am

TW870 wrote:
747B was a designation first used in the late-1960s to market increase gross weight versions of the 747. There were to be passenger 747Bs, Convertible freighters, and pure freighter 747Bs.

No airplane ever flew designated as a 747B..


Au contraire, mon frere. The first 747-200B aircraft, line number 88, registered N611US, during flight test was unpainted except for the red tail, and large "Boeing 747 B" titles on the fuselage.
"So many planes; so little time..."
 
TW870
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Fri Jun 14, 2019 5:26 am

justplanesmart wrote:
TW870 wrote:
747B was a designation first used in the late-1960s to market increase gross weight versions of the 747. There were to be passenger 747Bs, Convertible freighters, and pure freighter 747Bs.

No airplane ever flew designated as a 747B..


Au contraire, mon frere. The first 747-200B aircraft, line number 88, registered N611US, during flight test was unpainted except for the red tail, and large "Boeing 747 B" titles on the fuselage.


You are correct, but that never translated to an actual designation from the manufacturer. They flew the airplane with 747B titles, but the titles did not correspond to the certification. They could have certified the airplane as a 747B-51. But they didn't. It is a 747-251B. I am curious about when the -1xx and -2xxB nomenclature emerged. If there was a "747B" program, one would assume that there was a "747A" program. But history tells us that this is not always true. One comparison is the Lockheed Super Constellation. There were letters that modified the L1049 series for power, range, gross weight, and application (cargo, military, etc.). There was an L1049B (military Constellation), but no 1049A. The original, non-turbo Super Constellation was just L1049, not L1049A.
 
tullamarine
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Fri Jun 14, 2019 7:01 am

Interesting. I always thought the 200B was developed for QF due to the need for more range to HNL from MEL etc. I guess KL had the same needs given it also operated all the way to AU in the '70s.

The stretched 200 was originally referred to SUD but changed to EUD (Extended Upper Deck) when it was pointed out the in medical circles SUD was often an abbreviation for Sudden Unexplained Death.
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Ruddman
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Tue Jun 18, 2019 8:43 pm

Sorry to bring up a 4-day old thread, :p, but I’ve read that the early KLM -200B’s had the JT9D-7W fitted.

-7W?

I’ve heard of the -7 and -7A. But what is the -7W? Is it the 45,500lb -7 with the water injection?
If so, why didn’t they get fitted with the more powerful-7A if it was available?
 
blacksoviet
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Tue Jun 18, 2019 9:09 pm

MO11 wrote:
IAmGaroott wrote:
Every spec sheet I’ve seen on the VC-25 aircraft refers to them as a “heavily modified 747-200B”.

Upon further research, the only information I’ve found about the “B” designation is on the -100 and it refers to a MTOW increase.

My questions are: does the B just signify an increased MTOW, was there a non-B version of the 742, and why did Boeing not make B variants of the -300 and -400 (or did they)?


A -100B is a higher gross weight -100. Series -200 comes in either -200B, -200C, or -200F. There is no non-suffixed -200; the question might rather be whether Boeing had originally intended to offer a -200, but instead elected to make the -200B the basic version.

So what is the difference between the 747-100B and the 747-200B?
 
MO11
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Tue Jun 18, 2019 9:27 pm

blacksoviet wrote:
So what is the difference between the 747-100B and the 747-200B?


The 747-100B is basically a 747SR series airplane with certain modifications to permit increases in maximum permissible operating
weights. (The 747SR is basically a 747-100 series airplane with certain modifications to improve the fatigue life.)

The 747-200B is an extended-range passenger version of the basic 747-100 series aircraft. The exterior geometry of the 747-200B is
identical to the 747-100 and aircraft systems are essentially unchanged except for differences resulting from changes outlined below. The
principal differences involve the following:

Increased strength wing structure, local body and empennage changes for increased strength, increased center wing tank fuel capacity,
increased strength landing gear, modified nacelle and engine acoustic treatment, increased gross weight, and modified balance limits.


That's a "cut-and-paste" from the type certificate. As noted, there were only 12 -100Bs produced, and they weren't certificated until nearly 9 years after the -200B.
 
Miquel787
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Tue Jun 18, 2019 9:39 pm

Ruddman wrote:
Sorry to bring up a 4-day old thread, :p, but I’ve read that the early KLM -200B’s had the JT9D-7W fitted.

-7W?

I’ve heard of the -7 and -7A. But what is the -7W? Is it the 45,500lb -7 with the water injection?
If so, why didn’t they get fitted with the more powerful-7A if it was available?

I think the first KLM - 200B.s had JT9D-3AW.s fitted with waterinjection..Later it was brought to 7 spec.
 
Miquel787
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Tue Jun 18, 2019 9:46 pm

TW870 wrote:
justplanesmart wrote:
TW870 wrote:
747B was a designation first used in the late-1960s to market increase gross weight versions of the 747. There were to be passenger 747Bs, Convertible freighters, and pure freighter 747Bs.

No airplane ever flew designated as a 747B..


Au contraire, mon frere. The first 747-200B aircraft, line number 88, registered N611US, during flight test was unpainted except for the red tail, and large "Boeing 747 B" titles on the fuselage.


You are correct, but that never translated to an actual designation from the manufacturer. They flew the airplane with 747B titles, but the titles did not correspond to the certification. They could have certified the airplane as a 747B-51. But they didn't. It is a 747-251B. I am curious about when the -1xx and -2xxB nomenclature emerged. If there was a "747B" program, one would assume that there was a "747A" program. But history tells us that this is not always true. One comparison is the Lockheed Super Constellation. There were letters that modified the L1049 series for power, range, gross weight, and application (cargo, military, etc.). There was an L1049B (military Constellation), but no 1049A. The original, non-turbo Super Constellation was just L1049, not L1049A.

There was actually an "A" variant..but not specified by Boeing..When Pan Am got their first batch of 747.s in 1970 they sended them back to Boeing after a couple of months in service. Boeing made changes in fuelsystems,flaps,doors and to the JT9D..went from 3A to 3 AW with waterinjection..Pan Am called these modified 747.s the 747A.
 
LH707330
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Tue Jun 18, 2019 9:50 pm

TW870 wrote:
747B was a designation first used in the late-1960s to market increase gross weight versions of the 747. There were to be passenger 747Bs, Convertible freighters, and pure freighter 747Bs. Here is a 2-page magazine ad for the convertible and freighter versions of the 747B for sale on EBay from 1969:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/BOEING-AIRCRAF ... 2284398008

No airplane ever flew designated as a 747B. Instead, this version got the name 747-200B. As others said, there was not a standard -200, just the -200B. It raises the question if there were ever marketing materials for a "747A". I am not sure when they decided to call the early models the -100.

There was no real rule for Boeing for series designations. Early 707s were 707-100s (Pan Am got 707-121s for example). Early 727s were just 727s. No series at all. Northwest got 727-51s, for example. They didn't get a series until after the -200s went on the market. Later deliveries did become 727-100s. 720s were -000 series. In other words, Eastern got 720-025s. Bottom line is there was no standard system, and the 747 is the only airplane that had an increase gross weight version marketed as a "B".

Good point on the confusing designations. On the 707s the B suffix denoted turbofans, wing modifications (glove on the 100, flared tips and dogtooth on the 300), then on the 747 basically a beefed-up MTOW.
 
blacksoviet
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Tue Jun 18, 2019 10:07 pm

So does the 747-200B have more range than the 747-100B?
 
SpaceshipDC10
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Tue Jun 18, 2019 10:37 pm

Here's a nice view of probably the only 747B

https://s3.eu-west-2.amazonaws.com/abpi ... -large.jpg
 
TW870
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Tue Jun 18, 2019 10:39 pm

blacksoviet wrote:
So does the 747-200B have more range than the 747-100B?


Yes. There were not many -100Bs built. In fact the only ones I can think of were RB211-powered for Saudia. The -200B ended up going all the way to 830,000 lbs MGTOW in the later days, and many of those were built.
 
SpaceshipDC10
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Tue Jun 18, 2019 10:44 pm

TW870 wrote:
There were not many -100Bs built. In fact the only ones I can think of were RB211-powered for Saudia.


It was in fact slightly more common than just SV.

 
MO11
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Tue Jun 18, 2019 11:53 pm

SpaceshipDC10 wrote:
TW870 wrote:
There were not many -100Bs built. In fact the only ones I can think of were RB211-powered for Saudia.


It was in fact slightly more common than just SV.



8 Saudia
3 JAL (JT9)
1 Iran Air (JT9)
 
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Ruddman
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Wed Jun 19, 2019 12:07 am

Miquel787 wrote:
I think the first KLM - 200B.s had JT9D-3AW.s fitted with waterinjection..Later it was brought to 7 spec.


Wow, if at 775,000 lb max take off weight it must have been a slug with the -3A’s??!!
 
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Melbourne
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Wed Jun 19, 2019 12:26 am

Surprisingly the last -100B delivered to Saudia was in 1982 and from my understanding the last -100 to be delivered in general.
Their 747-300s were delivered only 3 years later

 
TW870
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Wed Jun 19, 2019 1:12 am

MO11 wrote:
SpaceshipDC10 wrote:
TW870 wrote:
There were not many -100Bs built. In fact the only ones I can think of were RB211-powered for Saudia.


It was in fact slightly more common than just SV.



8 Saudia
3 JAL (JT9)
1 Iran Air (JT9)


Anyone know what specifically gave it the -100B designation? Would it just have been lower SFC engines like the JT9D-7A (or -7F/J?) with the lower gross weight of the -100?

By the late-1970s, as they increased power and reduced SFC on the engine options (most notably the JT9D-7Q and 07R series), most carriers were buying the 747 for its range. The -100B was anomalous in that carriers were buying it for its size, not its range, which is understandable given the high traffic volumes on some regional routes that the three above named carriers had. In a deregulated environment like the U.S. (then later on Europe and Japan), the 747 wasn't versatile enough for a wide range of highly price competitive short and medium haul routes. Thus its presence on shorter routes faded, and new deliveries were slotted for trips like UA's SEA-HKG or NW's ORD-NRT or JFK-OSA, and were 830K -200Bs.
 
Miquel787
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Wed Jun 19, 2019 6:35 am

Ruddman wrote:
Miquel787 wrote:
I think the first KLM - 200B.s had JT9D-3AW.s fitted with waterinjection..Later it was brought to 7 spec.


Wow, if at 775,000 lb max take off weight it must have been a slug with the -3A’s??!!

You are not reading...3AW not 3A..and yes they were slow.
 
blacksoviet
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Wed Jun 19, 2019 7:30 am

Why didn't anybody order the 747SP with the JT9D-7Q engines? Wouldn't this have increased the range even further?
 
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hOMSaR
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Wed Jun 19, 2019 11:31 am

tullamarine wrote:
The stretched 200 was originally referred to SUD but changed to EUD (Extended Upper Deck) when it was pointed out the in medical circles SUD was often an abbreviation for Sudden Unexplained Death.


I’ve never heard that before. Every plane I’ve seen has been designated as -200SUD.

Looking just now through Google, there seem to be sparse references to an EUD, but a ton of 747 SUD references. Maybe the name change just never caught on?
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vhqpa
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Wed Jun 19, 2019 11:40 am

hOMSaR wrote:
tullamarine wrote:
The stretched 200 was originally referred to SUD but changed to EUD (Extended Upper Deck) when it was pointed out the in medical circles SUD was often an abbreviation for Sudden Unexplained Death.


I’ve never heard that before. Every plane I’ve seen has been designated as -200SUD.

Looking just now through Google, there seem to be sparse references to an EUD, but a ton of 747 SUD references. Maybe the name change just never caught on?


The only context I've seen EUD used is QF using it to refer to their 743 fleet. Up until retirement they were called "Boeing 747-338 EUD" on their fleet page. Although EUD probably was a better term. SUD could just as easily stand for "Short Upper Deck".
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vhqpa
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Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Wed Jun 19, 2019 11:54 am

Melbourne wrote:
Surprisingly the last -100B delivered to Saudia was in 1982 and from my understanding the last -100 to be delivered in general.
Their 747-300s were delivered only 3 years later



According to 747Classic in this current Tech Ops thread

747classic wrote:
blacksoviet wrote:
When was the last 747-100B built?


747-100B built :
747-146B : 22066, 22067, 23150
747-168B : 22498-22502, 22747-22749
747-186B : 21759

Last 747-100B , a 747-146B (23150 / 601) for JAL has been delivered at Dec 04 1984.

Also two 747-100B SUD are built :
747-146B SUD : 23390, 23637
The last ( 23636 / 655 ) for JAL was delivered at Sept 09 1986.


viewtopic.php?f=5&t=1424347

I'm curious when the last standard 747-100 was delivered. The highest MSN listed on the FAA TCDS is 21213 a 747-136 for British Airways G-BDPV with a delivery date of April 1976. Which seems pretty late so a good guess,but as MSNs aren't built in sequential order there's a chance something with a lower MSN was built afterwards.
"There you go ladies and gentleman we're through Mach 1 the speed of sound no bumps no bangs... CONCORDE"
 
User avatar
leleko747
Posts: 454
Joined: Mon Nov 05, 2007 4:16 pm

Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Wed Jun 19, 2019 12:02 pm

TW870 wrote:

There was no real rule for Boeing for series designations. Early 707s were 707-100s (Pan Am got 707-121s for example). Early 727s were just 727s. No series at all. Northwest got 727-51s, for example. They didn't get a series until after the -200s went on the market. Later deliveries did become 727-100s. 720s were -000 series. In other words, Eastern got 720-025s. Bottom line is there was no standard system, and the 747 is the only airplane that had an increase gross weight version marketed as a "B".


They still have weird designations nowadays:

The Boeing 767-400ER is marketed as such, but there's no Boeing 767-400 standard. So why use the ER label?
The Boeing 777F is essentially a freighter Boeing 777-200LR. Same fuselage length, GE90-only option, raked wingtips. So why call it only 777F? Boeing 777-200LRF look so much better.
I wonder when people will understand:
Embraer 190 or simply E190, not ERJ-190. E-Jets are NOT ERJs!
Boeing 747-8, not Boeing 747-800. Same goes for 787.
Airbus A320, not Airbus 320.
Airbii does not exist.
 
User avatar
Ruddman
Posts: 40
Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2017 3:02 pm

Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Wed Jun 19, 2019 12:25 pm

Miquel787 wrote:
You are not reading...3AW not 3A..and yes they were slow.


-3A....with water injection....-3AW. Finger slip. ;)



SO the question for some again regarding the 'upgrade'. I'v read KLM -200's were converted to -7W's. Why choose that over the -7A's which must have been available at the same time?
 
Miquel787
Posts: 98
Joined: Wed Jun 15, 2016 4:11 am

Re: 747 Classic B Variants

Wed Jun 19, 2019 2:01 pm

Ruddman wrote:
Miquel787 wrote:
You are not reading...3AW not 3A..and yes they were slow.


-3A....with water injection....-3AW. Finger slip. ;)



SO the question for some again regarding the 'upgrade'. I'v read KLM -200's were converted to -7W's. Why choose that over the -7A's which must have been available at the same time?

Ow..that.s a good question..I think the -200 .s from KLM were the first batch delivered...I thought they converted them to the -7A but maybe i.m wrong.. Maybe they took the 7W because the waterinstallation was already available because of the original 3AW.s. Qantas took delivery of VH-EBA in july 1971 also with 3AW.s and converted them also to the -7 spec..But that was much later..So..hmmm , this is one to find out..

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