CWL757
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Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Tue Jul 09, 2019 8:40 pm

https://m.facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=2601003126842755&id=1786599751616434 I was scrolling through Facebookand came across this video that appears to show an aircrafts engine spinner detached from its mount during a flight. Anyone know what happened here or what airline? Appears to be a Maddog.
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lexiion
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Tue Jul 09, 2019 9:07 pm

 
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DocLightning
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Tue Jul 09, 2019 9:10 pm

Why is the bearing glowing orange?
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Spacepope
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Tue Jul 09, 2019 9:10 pm

Here's the tweet by JACDEC. https://twitter.com/JacdecNew/status/11 ... 7205775361
TL:DR DL 1425, MD-88 ATL-BWI, diverted to RDU.
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jetwet1
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Tue Jul 09, 2019 9:15 pm

Just when you think you have seen everything....That video is amazing.
 
Dalmd88
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Tue Jul 09, 2019 9:43 pm

DocLightning wrote:
Why is the bearing glowing orange?

If you see the bearing like in this case that means the fwd cover has failed. Inside the cover there is an oil pump that sprays fresh oil on the number one bearing. The spinner is mounted to the cover. The N1 tach gen is mounted to the cover under the spinner.
 
kiowa
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Tue Jul 09, 2019 9:57 pm

the delta crew did not shut down the engine?????
 
Transpac787
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Tue Jul 09, 2019 10:06 pm

kiowa wrote:
the delta crew did not shut down the engine?????

Engines will always still windmill, even after shutdown. Short of a catastrophic failure or loss of oil pressure, engines will never fully seize.
 
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September11
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Tue Jul 09, 2019 10:19 pm

Interesting footage
Airliners.net of the Future
 
kiowa
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Tue Jul 09, 2019 10:27 pm

Transpac787 wrote:
kiowa wrote:
the delta crew did not shut down the engine?????

Engines will always still windmill, even after shutdown. Short of a catastrophic failure or loss of oil pressure, engines will never fully seize.



The pilots shutting down the engine would have entailed stopping all fluids and air transfer between engine and frame. Are you saying that you know that they did shut it down?
 
CplKlinger
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Tue Jul 09, 2019 11:31 pm

kiowa wrote:
Transpac787 wrote:
kiowa wrote:
the delta crew did not shut down the engine?????

Engines will always still windmill, even after shutdown. Short of a catastrophic failure or loss of oil pressure, engines will never fully seize.



The pilots shutting down the engine would have entailed stopping all fluids and air transfer between engine and frame. Are you saying that you know that they did shut it down?


I'll defer to those more knowledgable, but when you shut down the engine, unless the core has already seized, you cannot stop it from moving. Yes, you cut the fuel flow, and hydraulic pressure may be switched to other systems. That's indeed part of shutting it down. But that doesn't have *anything* to do with the fan windmilling or not. Unless their is catastrophic damage, that fan will keep turning, and at speed it's going to be moving fairly quickly.
 
Transpac787
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Tue Jul 09, 2019 11:46 pm

kiowa wrote:
The pilots shutting down the engine would have entailed stopping all fluids and air transfer between engine and frame. Are you saying that you know that they did shut it down?


No, pilots never deliberately seize their engines on shutdown, as you suggest they should have. What do you even mean "stopping all [...] air transfer between engine and frame"?? I'm getting the impression you're hurling absurd accusations without knowing how it it all works, in even the most basic sense.
 
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NWAROOSTER
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 12:12 am

The pilot would have pulled the fire handle which shuts all fuel flow to that engine or power plant. The pilot would not necessarily fire the the fire bottles unless there was an actual fire in the engine. The remaining remaining engine would supply hydraulic power and electric power as needed. If the aircraft was at a low enough altitude the pilot could have started the APU as a redundant backup. Their also is a RAT, Ram Air Turbine that could dropped for more sources of power also. :old:
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B757Forever
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 12:15 am

kiowa wrote:
Transpac787 wrote:
kiowa wrote:
the delta crew did not shut down the engine?????

Engines will always still windmill, even after shutdown. Short of a catastrophic failure or loss of oil pressure, engines will never fully seize.



The pilots shutting down the engine would have entailed stopping all fluids and air transfer between engine and frame. Are you saying that you know that they did shut it down?



A normal shut down stops fuel to the engine. In certain instances such as fire indications, the flight crew will pull the fire handle to shut off hydraulics and pneumatics. It appears to me the engine is just windmilling. No way to know what actions this crew took.
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nikeherc
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 12:30 am

I don’t know that much about the JT-8-D, but it seems like that might be more of a stationary nosecone than a rotating spinner. That would explain it not flying around and doing more damage to the engine and possibly to the aircraft. It would appear that bearing failure is actually the cause of the cone coming off and not the other way around.
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Max Q
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 12:47 am

NWAROOSTER wrote:
The pilot would have pulled the fire handle which shuts all fuel flow to that engine or power plant. The pilot would not necessarily fire the the fire bottles unless there was an actual fire in the engine. The remaining remaining engine would supply hydraulic power and electric power as needed. If the aircraft was at a low enough altitude the pilot could have started the APU as a redundant backup. Their also is a RAT, Ram Air Turbine that could dropped for more sources of power also. :old:





I can assure you there’s not a ram air turbine (RAT) installed on the MD80
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kiowa
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 12:50 am

Transpac787 wrote:
kiowa wrote:
The pilots shutting down the engine would have entailed stopping all fluids and air transfer between engine and frame. Are you saying that you know that they did shut it down?


No, pilots never deliberately seize their engines on shutdown, as you suggest they should have. What do you even mean "stopping all [...] air transfer between engine and frame"?? I'm getting the impression you're hurling absurd accusations without knowing how it it all works, in even the most basic sense.


Absurd accusations??? It was a simple question that you seem to be threatened by so you attack the poster. Pilots can shut down an engine with start levers or fire handles. With the heat in the picture I would hope they used the fire handle which would isolate the engine. I don’t know what they did and was asking if someone did know. Snarky replies like yours serve no purpose at all.
 
777Mech
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 1:29 am

nikeherc wrote:
I don’t know that much about the JT-8-D, but it seems like that might be more of a stationary nosecone than a rotating spinner. That would explain it not flying around and doing more damage to the engine and possibly to the aircraft. It would appear that bearing failure is actually the cause of the cone coming off and not the other way around.


From what I've heard, it was a compressor stall that jarred the spinner loose.
 
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NWAROOSTER
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 1:46 am

Max Q wrote:
NWAROOSTER wrote:
The pilot would have pulled the fire handle which shuts all fuel flow to that engine or power plant. The pilot would not necessarily fire the the fire bottles unless there was an actual fire in the engine. The remaining remaining engine would supply hydraulic power and electric power as needed. If the aircraft was at a low enough altitude the pilot could have started the APU as a redundant backup. Their also is a RAT, Ram Air Turbine that could dropped for more sources of power also. :old:


I can assure you there’s not a ram air turbine (RAT) installed on the MD80


You are correct. I think the Airbus A320 was the first to have a RAT that I worked with. I do not know if any earlier Airbus aircraft like A300 and A310 had a RAT. I think the Boeing 757 and 767 had a RAT. I don't know if any DC-10s had a RAT as they are a three engine aircraft. :old:
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wjcandee
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 2:19 am

DC10/MD11 and L1011 both have RATs.
 
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zeke
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 2:26 am

777Mech wrote:

From what I've heard, it was a compressor stall that jarred the spinner loose.


Were you on the ground when you heard the compressor stall ?

NWAROOSTER wrote:
I do not know if any earlier Airbus aircraft like A300 and A310 had a RAT.


yes they do
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DL752
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 3:26 am

I was working a flight in the same area and the pilots told us about this incident. They heard it over the radio.
I thought it was just a loss of power but I never thought of this piece coming dislodged.
Interesting to see it being held in there by the air force.

Glad they landed safely.

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oldannyboy
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 8:06 am

NWAROOSTER wrote:
Max Q wrote:
NWAROOSTER wrote:
The pilot would have pulled the fire handle which shuts all fuel flow to that engine or power plant. The pilot would not necessarily fire the the fire bottles unless there was an actual fire in the engine. The remaining remaining engine would supply hydraulic power and electric power as needed. If the aircraft was at a low enough altitude the pilot could have started the APU as a redundant backup. Their also is a RAT, Ram Air Turbine that could dropped for more sources of power also. :old:


I can assure you there’s not a ram air turbine (RAT) installed on the MD80


You are correct. I think the Airbus A320 was the first to have a RAT that I worked with. I do not know if any earlier Airbus aircraft like A300 and A310 had a RAT. I think the Boeing 757 and 767 had a RAT. I don't know if any DC-10s had a RAT as they are a three engine aircraft. :old:


The Vickers VC-10 had a RAM.
 
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 8:49 am

oldannyboy wrote:
NWAROOSTER wrote:
Max Q wrote:

I can assure you there’s not a ram air turbine (RAT) installed on the MD80


You are correct. I think the Airbus A320 was the first to have a RAT that I worked with. I do not know if any earlier Airbus aircraft like A300 and A310 had a RAT. I think the Boeing 757 and 767 had a RAT. I don't know if any DC-10s had a RAT as they are a three engine aircraft. :old:


The Vickers VC-10 had a RAM.

I know that we're going off topic now, but of essentially if you have an aircraft with no mechanical reversion to the operation of the flight controls following the loss of normally generated power, then a ram air turbine is used, unless sufficient power can be provided by the windmilling engines (this would include the DH 106 Comet and the Boeing 747 series up to the -8).

So for the MD-80, as the flight controls can be operated directly by rods and cables from the control column and rudder pedals, a Ram Air turbine (RAT) isn't required.

In terms of aircraft that use RAT's, they include all Airbus aircraft and Boeing aircraft after the Boeing 747, The Lockheed L-1011, the Douglas DC-10 and MD-11, the VC-10 and the HS121 Trident and the Concorde
 
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 9:38 am

Peterwk146 wrote:
oldannyboy wrote:
NWAROOSTER wrote:

You are correct. I think the Airbus A320 was the first to have a RAT that I worked with. I do not know if any earlier Airbus aircraft like A300 and A310 had a RAT. I think the Boeing 757 and 767 had a RAT. I don't know if any DC-10s had a RAT as they are a three engine aircraft. :old:


The Vickers VC-10 had a RAM.

I know that we're going off topic now, but of essentially if you have an aircraft with no mechanical reversion to the operation of the flight controls following the loss of normally generated power, then a ram air turbine is used, unless sufficient power can be provided by the windmilling engines (this would include the DH 106 Comet and the Boeing 747 series up to the -8).

So for the MD-80, as the flight controls can be operated directly by rods and cables from the control column and rudder pedals, a Ram Air turbine (RAT) isn't required.

In terms of aircraft that use RAT's, they include all Airbus aircraft and Boeing aircraft after the Boeing 747, The Lockheed L-1011, the Douglas DC-10 and MD-11, the VC-10 and the HS121 Trident and the Concorde



I’d just disagree on one point, the 747-8
does have a RAT that supplies hydraulic power
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Peterwk146
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 10:19 am

Max Q wrote:
Peterwk146 wrote:
oldannyboy wrote:

The Vickers VC-10 had a RAM.

I know that we're going off topic now, but of essentially if you have an aircraft with no mechanical reversion to the operation of the flight controls following the loss of normally generated power, then a ram air turbine is used, unless sufficient power can be provided by the windmilling engines (this would include the DH 106 Comet and the Boeing 747 series up to the -8).

So for the MD-80, as the flight controls can be operated directly by rods and cables from the control column and rudder pedals, a Ram Air turbine (RAT) isn't required.

In terms of aircraft that use RAT's, they include all Airbus aircraft and Boeing aircraft after the Boeing 747, The Lockheed L-1011, the Douglas DC-10 and MD-11, the VC-10 and the HS121 Trident and the Concorde



I’d just disagree on one point, the 747-8
does have a RAT that supplies hydraulic power


I agree - that is why I said "Up to the -8" - it doesn't include the -8 - I'll have to be more explicit in the future!
 
777boi
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 12:51 pm

Just for a laugh, there was some quality news reporting on an Australian news program here tonight. They stated it was the aircraft nose cone! Hahaha
Last edited by 777boi on Wed Jul 10, 2019 1:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
N757ST
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 12:57 pm

Peterwk146 wrote:
oldannyboy wrote:
NWAROOSTER wrote:

You are correct. I think the Airbus A320 was the first to have a RAT that I worked with. I do not know if any earlier Airbus aircraft like A300 and A310 had a RAT. I think the Boeing 757 and 767 had a RAT. I don't know if any DC-10s had a RAT as they are a three engine aircraft. :old:


The Vickers VC-10 had a RAM.

I know that we're going off topic now, but of essentially if you have an aircraft with no mechanical reversion to the operation of the flight controls following the loss of normally generated power, then a ram air turbine is used, unless sufficient power can be provided by the windmilling engines (this would include the DH 106 Comet and the Boeing 747 series up to the -8).

So for the MD-80, as the flight controls can be operated directly by rods and cables from the control column and rudder pedals, a Ram Air turbine (RAT) isn't required.

In terms of aircraft that use RAT's, they include all Airbus aircraft and Boeing aircraft after the Boeing 747, The Lockheed L-1011, the Douglas DC-10 and MD-11, the VC-10 and the HS121 Trident and the Concorde


I’m a bit surprised that some of these aircraft don’t have a RAT. What powers electronics during loss of power? Just the batteries?

On the ‘bus the RAT powers the blue hydraulic system which in turn runs an emergency generator powering the essential bus.
 
trent768
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 1:10 pm

I think the presence of the stator on the JT-8 kinda helped the situation. Imagine if there's no stator, that thing will just go straight to the fan and ruin everything!
 
YYZYYT
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 1:22 pm

I read the avherald piece linked above, and the comments... apparently it's not a "spinner" at all, its a dome that is fixed to static inlet guide vanes that sit in front of the first fan disc, the way that the engine is built and mounted. It also explains why the "spinner" looks intact in the video (I was wondering why it wasn't torn to shreds). There's a picture of an intact engine which clearly shows the guide vanes being fixed to the engine.

Which of course affects the severity of the incident, the cone wasn't in contact with the fan at all so there was no (serious) FOD problem. Otherwise a spinner detaching and staying in the cowl would probably cause significant damage to the engine.

Makes me wonder: I've noticed other T-tails with similar static vanes (VC-10, soviet designed). Is that a safety feature, are the static guide vanes there to protect the fan from larger FOD given the proximity of the fan to the fuselage (and possibly passengers)? ie, less chance of a larger object hitting the disc and causing the disc to break / uncontained failure? Is it a result of airflow changes caused by proximity to the fuselage?

In any event, I learned something today - cool!
 
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tb727
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 2:10 pm

Sounds like they had done some work on the number 1 bearing prior to this flight. If that’s the case, ooops.
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777Mech
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 2:35 pm

zeke wrote:
777Mech wrote:

From what I've heard, it was a compressor stall that jarred the spinner loose.


Were you on the ground when you heard the compressor stall?


Yeah. ..
 
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N62NA
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 3:31 pm

Just to show (once again!) how idiotic "the press" is:

https://gizmodo.com/video-captures-delt ... 1836232799

According to Popular Mechanics, the MD-88 is the “oldest plane in service with any major U.S. airline” and has earned a notorious reputation among pilots due to its antiquated controls, cramped cockpit, and extreme noisiness. In 2017, Bloomberg reported that Delta had taken to offering junior pilots fast-track to captain status if they agreed to fly routes using the jet—which Delta is planning to retire by 2020.
 
nycbjr
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 3:41 pm

N62NA wrote:
Just to show (once again!) how idiotic "the press" is:

https://gizmodo.com/video-captures-delt ... 1836232799

According to Popular Mechanics, the MD-88 is the “oldest plane in service with any major U.S. airline” and has earned a notorious reputation among pilots due to its antiquated controls, cramped cockpit, and extreme noisiness. In 2017, Bloomberg reported that Delta had taken to offering junior pilots fast-track to captain status if they agreed to fly routes using the jet—which Delta is planning to retire by 2020.


While I like the MD-80 series, is any of this really wrong? (aside from the Delta stuff cause don't know if thats just rumor).
 
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Seabear
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 3:45 pm

777boi wrote:
Just for a laugh, there was some quality news reporting on an Australian news program here tonight. They stated it was the aircraft nose cone! Hahaha


Shoddy reporting not exclusive to Down Under:

USA TODAY: Emergency landing after nose cone breaks

https://www.usatoday.com/videos/travel/ ... 690906001/
 
Taeks
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 4:08 pm

nycbjr wrote:
N62NA wrote:
Just to show (once again!) how idiotic "the press" is:

https://gizmodo.com/video-captures-delt ... 1836232799

According to Popular Mechanics, the MD-88 is the “oldest plane in service with any major U.S. airline” and has earned a notorious reputation among pilots due to its antiquated controls, cramped cockpit, and extreme noisiness. In 2017, Bloomberg reported that Delta had taken to offering junior pilots fast-track to captain status if they agreed to fly routes using the jet—which Delta is planning to retire by 2020.


While I like the MD-80 series, is any of this really wrong? (aside from the Delta stuff cause don't know if thats just rumor).


I didn't notice anything really wrong with those adjectives described there regarding the MD80. The cockpit is older, it is louder and more of these birds are being phased out.
 
Taeks
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 4:09 pm

Taeks wrote:
nycbjr wrote:
N62NA wrote:
Just to show (once again!) how idiotic "the press" is:

https://gizmodo.com/video-captures-delt ... 1836232799

According to Popular Mechanics, the MD-88 is the “oldest plane in service with any major U.S. airline” and has earned a notorious reputation among pilots due to its antiquated controls, cramped cockpit, and extreme noisiness. In 2017, Bloomberg reported that Delta had taken to offering junior pilots fast-track to captain status if they agreed to fly routes using the jet—which Delta is planning to retire by 2020.


While I like the MD-80 series, is any of this really wrong? (aside from the Delta stuff cause don't know if thats just rumor).


I didn't notice anything really wrong with those adjectives described there regarding the MD80. The cockpit is older, it is louder and more of these birds are being phased out.


All being said, the MD80 is one of my favorite aircraft.
 
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N62NA
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 5:14 pm

nycbjr wrote:
N62NA wrote:
Just to show (once again!) how idiotic "the press" is:

https://gizmodo.com/video-captures-delt ... 1836232799

According to Popular Mechanics, the MD-88 is the “oldest plane in service with any major U.S. airline” and has earned a notorious reputation among pilots due to its antiquated controls, cramped cockpit, and extreme noisiness. In 2017, Bloomberg reported that Delta had taken to offering junior pilots fast-track to captain status if they agreed to fly routes using the jet—which Delta is planning to retire by 2020.


While I like the MD-80 series, is any of this really wrong? (aside from the Delta stuff cause don't know if thats just rumor).



A "notorious reputation among pilots"

Not.
 
nycbjr
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 5:21 pm

N62NA wrote:
nycbjr wrote:
N62NA wrote:
Just to show (once again!) how idiotic "the press" is:

https://gizmodo.com/video-captures-delt ... 1836232799

According to Popular Mechanics, the MD-88 is the “oldest plane in service with any major U.S. airline” and has earned a notorious reputation among pilots due to its antiquated controls, cramped cockpit, and extreme noisiness. In 2017, Bloomberg reported that Delta had taken to offering junior pilots fast-track to captain status if they agreed to fly routes using the jet—which Delta is planning to retire by 2020.


While I like the MD-80 series, is any of this really wrong? (aside from the Delta stuff cause don't know if thats just rumor).



A "notorious reputation among pilots"

Not.


Well that I can agree on!
 
KlimaBXsst
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 6:17 pm

Shame I liked American’s and Delta’s MD 80, and MD 90 Series.

They are quiet when you are forward of the wing.
Aesthetically the A 340 got it right!
 
NW747-400
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 8:21 pm

N757ST wrote:
Peterwk146 wrote:
oldannyboy wrote:

The Vickers VC-10 had a RAM.

I know that we're going off topic now, but of essentially if you have an aircraft with no mechanical reversion to the operation of the flight controls following the loss of normally generated power, then a ram air turbine is used, unless sufficient power can be provided by the windmilling engines (this would include the DH 106 Comet and the Boeing 747 series up to the -8).

So for the MD-80, as the flight controls can be operated directly by rods and cables from the control column and rudder pedals, a Ram Air turbine (RAT) isn't required.

In terms of aircraft that use RAT's, they include all Airbus aircraft and Boeing aircraft after the Boeing 747, The Lockheed L-1011, the Douglas DC-10 and MD-11, the VC-10 and the HS121 Trident and the Concorde


I’m a bit surprised that some of these aircraft don’t have a RAT. What powers electronics during loss of power? Just the batteries?

On the ‘bus the RAT powers the blue hydraulic system which in turn runs an emergency generator powering the essential bus.


The MD80 has an emergency battery power system that lasts sufficiently to safely land the airplane.

Emergency hydraulic power with a RAT is not necessary on the DC9/MD80/90/717 family because the primary flight controls are operated with cables, pulleys and control tabs connected directly to the control wheels.

Hydraulics power flaps, slaps, landing gear, thrust reversers, brakes and nosewheel steering. In the event of a complete hydraulic loss, the airplane would land with flaps and slats retracted, gear extended using gravity free fall, free castering nose wheel steering to maintain directional control on the runway, and brake application using a hydraulic accumulator. Once stopped, the gear doors would be manually raised and pinned up by maintenance and the nosewheel steering bypassed to allow towing to the gate.
 
NW747-400
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Wed Jul 10, 2019 8:31 pm

YYZYYT wrote:
I read the avherald piece linked above, and the comments... apparently it's not a "spinner" at all, its a dome that is fixed to static inlet guide vanes that sit in front of the first fan disc, the way that the engine is built and mounted. It also explains why the "spinner" looks intact in the video (I was wondering why it wasn't torn to shreds). There's a picture of an intact engine which clearly shows the guide vanes being fixed to the engine.

Which of course affects the severity of the incident, the cone wasn't in contact with the fan at all so there was no (serious) FOD problem. Otherwise a spinner detaching and staying in the cowl would probably cause significant damage to the engine.

Makes me wonder: I've noticed other T-tails with similar static vanes (VC-10, soviet designed). Is that a safety feature, are the static guide vanes there to protect the fan from larger FOD given the proximity of the fan to the fuselage (and possibly passengers)? ie, less chance of a larger object hitting the disc and causing the disc to break / uncontained failure? Is it a result of airflow changes caused by proximity to the fuselage?

In any event, I learned something today - cool!


Inlet Guide Vanes, or IGV’s, were installed on older engines to direct airflow into the engine at an appropriate angle. This was done to minimize compressor stalls when the compressor blades were operating at a high angle of attack, such as takeoff, go around and climb thrust settings.

IGV’s are redundant today as a result of engine technology advances. FADEC systems can now detect blade angle of attack and direct the engine fuel control system to adjust variable guide vanes within the engine core to direct airflow over the compressor blades and prevent an impending compressor stall.
 
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DL717
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Thu Jul 11, 2019 2:02 am

DocLightning wrote:
Why is the bearing glowing orange?


Short clip, could be the bearings are just having a meltdown.
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dcall620
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Thu Jul 11, 2019 3:02 am

I noticed on flightradar24 that the aircraft involved N906DL left RDU today back for ATL but then diverted to CLT. Does anyone know why was that?
 
SANMAN66
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Thu Jul 11, 2019 4:43 am

I wonder if they were able to recover the spinner, or did it fall out in-flight?
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speedbird52
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Re: Engine spinner detaches mid-flight.

Thu Jul 11, 2019 5:14 am

kiowa wrote:
Transpac787 wrote:
kiowa wrote:
the delta crew did not shut down the engine?????

Engines will always still windmill, even after shutdown. Short of a catastrophic failure or loss of oil pressure, engines will never fully seize.



The pilots shutting down the engine would have entailed stopping all fluids and air transfer between engine and frame. Are you saying that you know that they did shut it down?

Stopping all fluids and air transfer between the engine and frame wouldn't really make that video look any different

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