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A380MSN004
Topic Author
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Porter Airlines / Case study

Fri Aug 16, 2019 2:54 pm

Hi everyone,

I was doing some researches about Porter Airlines as I found this airline pretty interesting. Their main asset seems to be the YTZ Airport + the majority of the slots they are owning there.
I have a couple of questions and hope you guys can help to get the answers :

- How do they managed to get the majority of the slots @ YTZ?
- What was the traffic at YTZ before Porter jump on the scene at YTZ?
- Does the choice of the Q400 was the best choice for them to operate from YTZ?
- Does Porter is profitable?
- How do you guys see the business for Porter for the next 10 years?

Many thanks.
 
YEG727LAX
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Mar 04, 2019 5:44 pm

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Fri Aug 16, 2019 3:37 pm

Before Porter, the only flights from YTZ were daily to YOW by Air Canada Jazz.
A holding company (REGCO Holdings) bought the terminal in 2005; in 2006 Jazz cancelled the service to YOW and the contract with the terminal building was terminated (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Porter_Airlines).
With the YTZ restrictions against jet aircraft, there were not many options for aircraft besides the Q400.
 
TObound
Posts: 781
Joined: Mon May 27, 2019 12:54 am

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Fri Aug 16, 2019 3:40 pm

Porter owns most of the slots because they built and owned the main terminal (which has now been sold off).

Traffic was an order of magnitude lower before Porter. YTZ has a long history of new entrants setting up, followed by Air Canada setting up a regional operation to undercut the competition, followed by Air Canada shutting down the operation when the competition goes bankrupt. It's for this reason that the CEO of Porter (Bob Deluce) insisted on owning the terminal and getting control of most of the slots. This would prevent AC for repeating the past.

The Q400 is the best choice for Porter, because YTZ does not allow "jet" airplanes. Tuboprops are allowed. Turbofans aren't allowed. Moreover, the length of the runway doesn't allow for much choice.

PD is sort of stuck as a business. They are somewhat profitable. But they can't grow because they don't have the same YTZ advantage elsewhere. And if VIA's High Frequency Rail plan happens, there will be significant pressure on their YTZ-YOW business. They'll have to become a more US focused airline over time.
 
klakzky123
Posts: 688
Joined: Mon Jul 04, 2016 4:05 am

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Fri Aug 16, 2019 4:04 pm

TObound wrote:
Porter owns most of the slots because they built and owned the main terminal (which has now been sold off).

Traffic was an order of magnitude lower before Porter. YTZ has a long history of new entrants setting up, followed by Air Canada setting up a regional operation to undercut the competition, followed by Air Canada shutting down the operation when the competition goes bankrupt. It's for this reason that the CEO of Porter (Bob Deluce) insisted on owning the terminal and getting control of most of the slots. This would prevent AC for repeating the past.

The Q400 is the best choice for Porter, because YTZ does not allow "jet" airplanes. Tuboprops are allowed. Turbofans aren't allowed. Moreover, the length of the runway doesn't allow for much choice.

PD is sort of stuck as a business. They are somewhat profitable. But they can't grow because they don't have the same YTZ advantage elsewhere. And if VIA's High Frequency Rail plan happens, there will be significant pressure on their YTZ-YOW business. They'll have to become a more US focused airline over time.


If the Conservatives win the election this year, its possible that the Tripartite agreement might be changed. The A220 meets the noise requirements of the current agreement but the current agreement specifically prohibits "jets" so PD can't use them.

I think if jets are allowed in YTZ, PD will gain lots of new growth opportunities. But it will require a different government (and even then, they'll need the city of Toronto to buy in).
 
Dominion301
Posts: 2813
Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2016 1:48 pm

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Fri Aug 16, 2019 4:23 pm

TObound wrote:
Porter owns most of the slots because they built and owned the main terminal (which has now been sold off).

Traffic was an order of magnitude lower before Porter. YTZ has a long history of new entrants setting up, followed by Air Canada setting up a regional operation to undercut the competition, followed by Air Canada shutting down the operation when the competition goes bankrupt. It's for this reason that the CEO of Porter (Bob Deluce) insisted on owning the terminal and getting control of most of the slots. This would prevent AC for repeating the past.

The Q400 is the best choice for Porter, because YTZ does not allow "jet" airplanes. Tuboprops are allowed. Turbofans aren't allowed. Moreover, the length of the runway doesn't allow for much choice.

PD is sort of stuck as a business. They are somewhat profitable. But they can't grow because they don't have the same YTZ advantage elsewhere. And if VIA's High Frequency Rail plan happens, there will be significant pressure on their YTZ-YOW business. They'll have to become a more US focused airline over time.


Yeah if HFR gets the green light, YTZ-YOW is the most vulerable to significant O&D loss...far more so than YYZ-YOW as even with HFR, much of the western/northern GTA won't reap its benefits. However, PD could add more YTZ-YOW-east to offset O&D losses at YOW. Examples include YTZ-YOW-YYG and YTZ-YOW-YQY, along with more frequency to their existing stations.

As for pre-PD, prior to Regco (precursor to Porter) evicting AC from YTZ, AC were down to a mere two YTZ-YOW (weekday-only!) flights.

Jets on the island or not, it'll be interesting to see if PD eventually purchase another 6-8 DH4s for expansion. I've always thought they could do well with a regional YOW hub and add routes east of YOW to YQB, YQY and YYG and west of YOW to YQT, YWG, YQG, YSB, YKF and/or YHM and maybe even YXU, EWR, BOS and seasonal MYR.

A small YOW hub would make connections from Atlantic Canada vastly more appealing to a lot of places than the stop and YOW, connect at YTZ that's currently available.
 
TObound
Posts: 781
Joined: Mon May 27, 2019 12:54 am

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Fri Aug 16, 2019 4:38 pm

klakzky123 wrote:
TObound wrote:
Porter owns most of the slots because they built and owned the main terminal (which has now been sold off).

Traffic was an order of magnitude lower before Porter. YTZ has a long history of new entrants setting up, followed by Air Canada setting up a regional operation to undercut the competition, followed by Air Canada shutting down the operation when the competition goes bankrupt. It's for this reason that the CEO of Porter (Bob Deluce) insisted on owning the terminal and getting control of most of the slots. This would prevent AC for repeating the past.

The Q400 is the best choice for Porter, because YTZ does not allow "jet" airplanes. Tuboprops are allowed. Turbofans aren't allowed. Moreover, the length of the runway doesn't allow for much choice.

PD is sort of stuck as a business. They are somewhat profitable. But they can't grow because they don't have the same YTZ advantage elsewhere. And if VIA's High Frequency Rail plan happens, there will be significant pressure on their YTZ-YOW business. They'll have to become a more US focused airline over time.


If the Conservatives win the election this year, its possible that the Tripartite agreement might be changed. The A220 meets the noise requirements of the current agreement but the current agreement specifically prohibits "jets" so PD can't use them.

I think if jets are allowed in YTZ, PD will gain lots of new growth opportunities. But it will require a different government (and even then, they'll need the city of Toronto to buy in).


It's called a tripartite agreement for a reason. It's still going to be challenging to change. And it will require a runway extension.

Also, a lot of that energy may be migrating towards the Pickering airport, with Durham region being more conservative friendly. Investors there aren't going to want the government investing in anything else that increases competition.
 
TObound
Posts: 781
Joined: Mon May 27, 2019 12:54 am

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Fri Aug 16, 2019 4:49 pm

Dominion301 wrote:

Yeah if HFR gets the green light, YTZ-YOW is the most vulerable to significant O&D loss...far more so than YYZ-YOW as even with HFR, much of the western/northern GTA won't reap its benefits. However, PD could add more YTZ-YOW-east to offset O&D losses at YOW. Examples include YTZ-YOW-YYG and YTZ-YOW-YQY, along with more frequency to their existing stations.


Dominion301 wrote:
Jets on the island or not, it'll be interesting to see if PD eventually purchase another 6-8 DH4s for expansion. I've always thought they could do well with a regional YOW hub and add routes east of YOW to YQB, YQY and YYG and west of YOW to YQT, YWG, YQG, YSB, YKF and/or YHM and maybe even YXU, EWR, BOS and seasonal MYR.

A small YOW hub would make connections from Atlantic Canada vastly more appealing to a lot of places than the stop and YOW, connect at YTZ that's currently available.


Tag-ons won't make a difference to the lower yield on YTZ-YOW with HFR. If they want to use the aircraft though, hubbing some in YOW is one way to get some utilization.

The real risk though is that AC might just be motivated to open their own YOW hub to repeat their YTZ tactic at YOW. And with lots of new 223s coming, AC is well equipped to do that. They could drive PD out of YOW in months if they wanted to.
 
Dominion301
Posts: 2813
Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2016 1:48 pm

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Fri Aug 16, 2019 5:32 pm

TObound wrote:
Dominion301 wrote:

Yeah if HFR gets the green light, YTZ-YOW is the most vulerable to significant O&D loss...far more so than YYZ-YOW as even with HFR, much of the western/northern GTA won't reap its benefits. However, PD could add more YTZ-YOW-east to offset O&D losses at YOW. Examples include YTZ-YOW-YYG and YTZ-YOW-YQY, along with more frequency to their existing stations.


Dominion301 wrote:
Jets on the island or not, it'll be interesting to see if PD eventually purchase another 6-8 DH4s for expansion. I've always thought they could do well with a regional YOW hub and add routes east of YOW to YQB, YQY and YYG and west of YOW to YQT, YWG, YQG, YSB, YKF and/or YHM and maybe even YXU, EWR, BOS and seasonal MYR.

A small YOW hub would make connections from Atlantic Canada vastly more appealing to a lot of places than the stop and YOW, connect at YTZ that's currently available.


Tag-ons won't make a difference to the lower yield on YTZ-YOW with HFR. If they want to use the aircraft though, hubbing some in YOW is one way to get some utilization.

The real risk though is that AC might just be motivated to open their own YOW hub to repeat their YTZ tactic at YOW. And with lots of new 223s coming, AC is well equipped to do that. They could drive PD out of YOW in months if they wanted to.


The thing with HFR, even on YTZ-YOW, is that it'll shave off a max of 45 minutes one-way between Toronto and Ottawa. For the same-day return biz pax, flying will still be a far more appealing option than the train. For a round-trip, the plane will still be 2 hours of flying. The train will drop from a minimum of 9 hours to a minimum of 7.5 hours travel time.

Given the large number of same-day return passengers on the route, O&D yield loss due to HFR is probably minimal. This all assumes HFR actually gets the green light beyond the money in Budget 2019 for the studies. You're talking a decade minimum before any trains would get rolling along the abandoned CP corridor. A decade in the airline industry is an eternity!
 
santi319
Posts: 1021
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 3:24 pm

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Fri Aug 16, 2019 5:56 pm

Dominion301 wrote:





The thing with HFR, even on YTZ-YOW, is that it'll shave off a max of 45 minutes one-way between Toronto and Ottawa. For the same-day return biz pax, flying will still be a far more appealing option than the train. For a round-trip, the plane will still be 2 hours of flying. The train will drop from a minimum of 9 hours to a minimum of 7.5 hours travel time.

Given the large number of same-day return passengers on the route, O&D yield loss due to HFR is probably minimal. This all assumes HFR actually gets the green light beyond the money in Budget 2019 for the studies. You're talking a decade minimum before any trains would get rolling along the abandoned CP corridor. A decade in the airline industry is an eternity!


This ^^^^^

YTZ trumps the HFR, specially when you can have a Fidelity program that you can also use the miles for travel.

Porter ain’t going anywhere, literally.
 
TObound
Posts: 781
Joined: Mon May 27, 2019 12:54 am

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Fri Aug 16, 2019 8:19 pm

Dominion301 wrote:
The thing with HFR, even on YTZ-YOW, is that it'll shave off a max of 45 minutes one-way between Toronto and Ottawa. For the same-day return biz pax, flying will still be a far more appealing option than the train. For a round-trip, the plane will still be 2 hours of flying. The train will drop from a minimum of 9 hours to a minimum of 7.5 hours travel time.

Given the large number of same-day return passengers on the route, O&D yield loss due to HFR is probably minimal. This all assumes HFR actually gets the green light beyond the money in Budget 2019 for the studies. You're talking a decade minimum before any trains would get rolling along the abandoned CP corridor. A decade in the airline industry is an eternity!


I think you're being far too optimistic on the air side. An apples-to-apples comparison requires comparing station/airport access time, pre-boarding, etc. The last estimate I saw of HFR had Toronto-Ottawa at 3:15 hrs (I think it was a G&M article a few weeks back....hit my article limit unfortunately). At that kind of timing, downtown to downtown would be ~4 hrs by rail and ~2.5 hrs with PD at YTZ. So air will have a 1.5 hr travel time advantage. On the other hand, you get 3 productive hours on the train and far less pre-boarding hassles. I would bet at this point, that a lot of business travel which isn't same day return will migrate to rail. This is indeed what we see in many other parts of the world where rail is marginally competitive.

At this point, PD has two choices. Cut prices to compete which will cut yield. Or cut frequencies, to reduce the number of seats, to favour same day return traffic. Either choice sees them with less revenue and profit from this sector.

There's also some minor second order effects. If YUL becomes substantially easier to travel to, more options are opened up for Ottawa traveler at Dorval. Maybe fewer choose to connect at YTZ. Admittedly, this probably a small part of PD's YTW-YOW business and not likely to take a large hit from HFR.

You're right that the threat is a while away. But I would probably guess at closer to 8 years than a decade. VIA's last estimate was 4 years to complete construction. There's less complications using and old ROW (appropriation, environmental stuff, etc.). I think the critical path for them (in more ways than one) is simply getting the go-ahead and funding (through the CIB or private investors). But I really would bet on this being in service by 2030. And if Porter isn't planning now for this eventuality, that would be some poor management.
 
TObound
Posts: 781
Joined: Mon May 27, 2019 12:54 am

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Fri Aug 16, 2019 8:20 pm

santi319 wrote:
Dominion301 wrote:





The thing with HFR, even on YTZ-YOW, is that it'll shave off a max of 45 minutes one-way between Toronto and Ottawa. For the same-day return biz pax, flying will still be a far more appealing option than the train. For a round-trip, the plane will still be 2 hours of flying. The train will drop from a minimum of 9 hours to a minimum of 7.5 hours travel time.

Given the large number of same-day return passengers on the route, O&D yield loss due to HFR is probably minimal. This all assumes HFR actually gets the green light beyond the money in Budget 2019 for the studies. You're talking a decade minimum before any trains would get rolling along the abandoned CP corridor. A decade in the airline industry is an eternity!


This ^^^^^

YTZ trumps the HFR, specially when you can have a Fidelity program that you can also use the miles for travel.

Porter ain’t going anywhere, literally.


Nobody is suggesting that Porter is going anywhere. What I have suggested above is that a smaller Ottawa business might free up aircraft and resource for other destinations or even a second hub in YOW.
 
santi319
Posts: 1021
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 3:24 pm

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Fri Aug 16, 2019 8:27 pm

TObound wrote:
santi319 wrote:
Dominion301 wrote:





The thing with HFR, even on YTZ-YOW, is that it'll shave off a max of 45 minutes one-way between Toronto and Ottawa. For the same-day return biz pax, flying will still be a far more appealing option than the train. For a round-trip, the plane will still be 2 hours of flying. The train will drop from a minimum of 9 hours to a minimum of 7.5 hours travel time.

Given the large number of same-day return passengers on the route, O&D yield loss due to HFR is probably minimal. This all assumes HFR actually gets the green light beyond the money in Budget 2019 for the studies. You're talking a decade minimum before any trains would get rolling along the abandoned CP corridor. A decade in the airline industry is an eternity!


This ^^^^^

YTZ trumps the HFR, specially when you can have a Fidelity program that you can also use the miles for travel.

Porter ain’t going anywhere, literally.


Nobody is suggesting that Porter is going anywhere. What I have suggested above is that a smaller Ottawa business might free up aircraft and resource for other destinations or even a second hub in YOW.


You missed my sarcasm my friend..
 
TObound
Posts: 781
Joined: Mon May 27, 2019 12:54 am

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Fri Aug 16, 2019 9:53 pm

santi319 wrote:
TObound wrote:
santi319 wrote:

This ^^^^^

YTZ trumps the HFR, specially when you can have a Fidelity program that you can also use the miles for travel.

Porter ain’t going anywhere, literally.


Nobody is suggesting that Porter is going anywhere. What I have suggested above is that a smaller Ottawa business might free up aircraft and resource for other destinations or even a second hub in YOW.


You missed my sarcasm my friend..


Ha! Now that I reread it....well done.
 
FlyingElvii
Posts: 881
Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2017 10:53 pm

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Fri Aug 16, 2019 11:15 pm

santi319 wrote:
Dominion301 wrote:





The thing with HFR, even on YTZ-YOW, is that it'll shave off a max of 45 minutes one-way between Toronto and Ottawa. For the same-day return biz pax, flying will still be a far more appealing option than the train. For a round-trip, the plane will still be 2 hours of flying. The train will drop from a minimum of 9 hours to a minimum of 7.5 hours travel time.

Given the large number of same-day return passengers on the route, O&D yield loss due to HFR is probably minimal. This all assumes HFR actually gets the green light beyond the money in Budget 2019 for the studies. You're talking a decade minimum before any trains would get rolling along the abandoned CP corridor. A decade in the airline industry is an eternity!


This ^^^^^

YTZ trumps the HFR, specially when you can have a Fidelity program that you can also use the miles for travel.

Porter ain’t going anywhere, literally.

Have to agree... I have had reason to take a few recent trips on Porter recently, and frankly, it’s ytz convenience can’t be beat. (once you figure out the whole tunnel vs. ferry thing!) Porter found a niche, Central Toronto is just minutes away, instead of a $30 train ride. You get off, you get out, instead of having to navigate a huge customs mess, especially south-bound.

They have actual customer service, instead of snarls and growls from the red customer service people you may not even talk to on the trip.
 
Cubsrule
Posts: 14490
Joined: Sat May 15, 2004 12:13 pm

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Fri Aug 16, 2019 11:39 pm

FlyingElvii wrote:
santi319 wrote:
Dominion301 wrote:





The thing with HFR, even on YTZ-YOW, is that it'll shave off a max of 45 minutes one-way between Toronto and Ottawa. For the same-day return biz pax, flying will still be a far more appealing option than the train. For a round-trip, the plane will still be 2 hours of flying. The train will drop from a minimum of 9 hours to a minimum of 7.5 hours travel time.

Given the large number of same-day return passengers on the route, O&D yield loss due to HFR is probably minimal. This all assumes HFR actually gets the green light beyond the money in Budget 2019 for the studies. You're talking a decade minimum before any trains would get rolling along the abandoned CP corridor. A decade in the airline industry is an eternity!


This ^^^^^

YTZ trumps the HFR, specially when you can have a Fidelity program that you can also use the miles for travel.

Porter ain’t going anywhere, literally.

Have to agree... I have had reason to take a few recent trips on Porter recently, and frankly, it’s ytz convenience can’t be beat. (once you figure out the whole tunnel vs. ferry thing!) Porter found a niche, Central Toronto is just minutes away, instead of a $30 train ride. You get off, you get out, instead of having to navigate a huge customs mess, especially south-bound.

They have actual customer service, instead of snarls and growls from the red customer service people you may not even talk to on the trip.


I actually think YTZ is more advantageous northbound. The lack of preclearance can make things pretty gnarly in the States if, for instance, Y4 has a couple of planes in the ground at MDW. But when I recently flew PD to YTZ with the family, we went from wheels down to landslide in 20 minutes with no Nexus and checked bags. 20 minutes from wheels down at YYZ, you aren’t even to immigration many times.
I can't decide whether I miss the tulip or the bowling shoe more
 
santi319
Posts: 1021
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 3:24 pm

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Sat Aug 17, 2019 1:21 am

I never got the whole preclear vs clearing in the US thing... its the same thing, you wait in line etc - same thing... specially now with mobile passport and Global Entry, frankly, that money should be invested in hiring more US Customs personnel, imagine all the gate space that it would open in the already crowded Canadian airports, specially YYZ...but then again what do I know....
 
jetblueguy22
Posts: 3487
Joined: Thu Nov 29, 2007 12:26 am

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:08 am

santi319 wrote:
I never got the whole preclear vs clearing in the US thing... its the same thing, you wait in line etc - same thing... specially now with mobile passport and Global Entry, frankly, that money should be invested in hiring more US Customs personnel, imagine all the gate space that it would open in the already crowded Canadian airports, specially YYZ...but then again what do I know....

It’s nice getting off a flight and just going right to baggage claim or your vehicle... Get all the “fun” over with before you get there. The beginning of the trip is usually the more stressful part in my experience.
Look at sweatpants guy. This is a 90 million dollar aircraft, not a Tallahassee strip club
 
FlyingElvii
Posts: 881
Joined: Wed Dec 27, 2017 10:53 pm

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Sat Aug 17, 2019 6:03 am

Cubsrule wrote:
FlyingElvii wrote:
santi319 wrote:

This ^^^^^

YTZ trumps the HFR, specially when you can have a Fidelity program that you can also use the miles for travel.

Porter ain’t going anywhere, literally.

Have to agree... I have had reason to take a few recent trips on Porter recently, and frankly, it’s ytz convenience can’t be beat. (once you figure out the whole tunnel vs. ferry thing!) Porter found a niche, Central Toronto is just minutes away, instead of a $30 train ride. You get off, you get out, instead of having to navigate a huge customs mess, especially south-bound.

They have actual customer service, instead of snarls and growls from the red customer service people you may not even talk to on the trip.


I actually think YTZ is more advantageous northbound. The lack of preclearance can make things pretty gnarly in the States if, for instance, Y4 has a couple of planes in the ground at MDW. But when I recently flew PD to YTZ with the family, we went from wheels down to landslide in 20 minutes with no Nexus and checked bags. 20 minutes from wheels down at YYZ, you aren’t even to immigration many times.

Especially if you have to wait for the bus from the remote terminal.
 
Dominion301
Posts: 2813
Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2016 1:48 pm

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Sat Aug 17, 2019 2:13 pm

santi319 wrote:
I never got the whole preclear vs clearing in the US thing... its the same thing, you wait in line etc - same thing... specially now with mobile passport and Global Entry, frankly, that money should be invested in hiring more US Customs personnel, imagine all the gate space that it would open in the already crowded Canadian airports, specially YYZ...but then again what do I know....


The huge benefit of preclearance is that you arrive in the US as essentially a domestic passenger. It vastly reduces the minimum connection time vs a transborder flight being an international arrival. PD will benefit at EWR and BOS with their B6 interline agreement once preclearance is in place. Same goes for the US carriers at YQB. It’s amazing how long it’s taking since the signing of the expanded bilateral preclearance agreement. The last Canadian airport to land preclearance was YHZ in 2006. That took only about a year to set up.
 
Insertnamehere
Posts: 320
Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2018 3:44 am

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Sat Aug 17, 2019 6:01 pm

santi319 wrote:
I never got the whole preclear vs clearing in the US thing... its the same thing, you wait in line etc - same thing... specially now with mobile passport and Global Entry, frankly, that money should be invested in hiring more US Customs personnel, imagine all the gate space that it would open in the already crowded Canadian airports, specially YYZ...but then again what do I know....


it also allows having airlines the opportunity to operate flights to an airport that does not have a customs area in place such as LGA, CMH, or DCA. While they might have US Customs personnel they don't have facilities to handle multiple flights needing to clear Customs in the US.
 
aamd11
Posts: 916
Joined: Sat Nov 17, 2001 11:54 am

Re: Porter Airlines / Case study

Sun Aug 18, 2019 1:40 am

Dominion301 wrote:
Jets on the island or not, it'll be interesting to see if PD eventually purchase another 6-8 DH4s for expansion.

Back in 2016, three more Q400s were ordered, bringing the fleet to 29 aircraft. These were to add some peak capacity, and some flexibility with regards to maintaining a reliable schedule. At the time, company staff were told that if the company hit the financial targets/budget in 2017/18, a further three were to be ordered for a total fleet of 32. The extra six Q400s (in total, if ordered) was the official growth plan for he period up to 2019, and this plan, it was suggested, included the possibility of added non-YTZ flying. The 2019 range for the plan was intentional - one eye on the federal election due in the autumn... CSeries and all that.

Porter’s 29th Q400 was delivered in early 2017. The fleet still stands at 29. The additional three aircraft planned have not yet materialized.
 
Speedalive
Posts: 166
Joined: Sun Jan 17, 2016 7:09 pm

tRe: Porter Airlines / Case study

Sun Sep 22, 2019 4:23 am

If the conservatives get voted in with Ford sitting in office, I hope the tripartite agreement gets revisited. I’d love to see some A220.s flying into YTZ. Problem is the local nimbys and Adam Vaughn though. From what I understand, PD still hasn’t cancelled their conditional order, so maybe they’re waiting for the election results. Perhaps they’ll give it a go again if we get a conservative government.

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