MBSDALHOU
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737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 4:03 am

https://apple.news/AxTmtEsvBTqqLvTxlEWwfnw

According to this a 737NG was found to have a “cracked pickle fork”
From what I can tell a pickle fork basically holds the plane together.
Can anyone with any sort of knowledge shes some light on this?
And why is it called a pickle fork?
 
MBSDALHOU
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 4:07 am

Ok did a little googling and found this to help explain the pickle fork
https://komonews.com/news/local/exclusi ... -equipment

How does a pickle fork crack if it’s designed to last the lifetime of an aircraft?

Hard landing? Improper maintenance?

Not trying to make this into a Boeing bad thread or anything like that!
Just trying to figure out how this pickle fork got damaged and why.
And why on earth is it called a pickle fork?!
 
Texas77
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 4:27 am

well, if the entire 737NG fleet is grounded, that might disrupt air travel a bit. lets all hope this is some unique, rare occurrence and doesn't lead to any significant flight issues...
 
VSMUT
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 4:29 am

Sounds similar to the stuff uncovered by Al Jazeera a few years back.
 
kevin5345179
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 4:32 am

or the material simply doesn't hold for 90k cycles ....
 
hagela
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 4:45 am

The 767s have had picklefork issues so it's not uncommon. I'm not sure what they were since I've never been personally involved but I think it sometimes required replacement.

That said, I don't understand how Boeing workers would have found a cracked picklefork on an in-service B737. I didn't think their aftermarket support had gotten into doing heavy checks which is where that would be found.

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
 
kevin5345179
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 4:51 am

hagela wrote:
The 767s have had picklefork issues so it's not uncommon. I'm not sure what they were since I've never been personally involved but I think it sometimes required replacement.

That said, I don't understand how Boeing workers would have found a cracked picklefork on an in-service B737. I didn't think their aftermarket support had gotten into doing heavy checks which is where that would be found.

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk


they found it from performing modification on heavily used plane (35k cycle out of 90k for entire service life spam)
 
VSMUT
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 5:24 am

kevin5345179 wrote:
hagela wrote:
The 767s have had picklefork issues so it's not uncommon. I'm not sure what they were since I've never been personally involved but I think it sometimes required replacement.

That said, I don't understand how Boeing workers would have found a cracked picklefork on an in-service B737. I didn't think their aftermarket support had gotten into doing heavy checks which is where that would be found.

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk


they found it from performing modification on heavily used plane (35k cycle out of 90k for entire service life spam)


What, 35000 out of 90000 is heavily used?
 
kevin5345179
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 6:13 am

VSMUT wrote:
kevin5345179 wrote:
hagela wrote:
The 767s have had picklefork issues so it's not uncommon. I'm not sure what they were since I've never been personally involved but I think it sometimes required replacement.

That said, I don't understand how Boeing workers would have found a cracked picklefork on an in-service B737. I didn't think their aftermarket support had gotten into doing heavy checks which is where that would be found.

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk


they found it from performing modification on heavily used plane (35k cycle out of 90k for entire service life spam)


What, 35000 out of 90000 is heavily used?


I would guess in terms of # of years to achieve that many cycles
but yeah, this is why Boeing + FAA both should be super concern
 
B777LRF
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 7:01 am

Serious allegations of sub-standard production quality on the 737 have run rampant for decades. To anybody who's been following this, it's hardly a matter of surprise something nasty would turn up sooner or later. And, just to set the record straight, similar non-conformities have now been found on several other frames.

As to the severity of the issue, I'll leave that to qualified engineers to debate. But I, for one, do not envision this resulting in a fleet-wide grounding. First they'll need to understand the extent of the problem, as it could very well be limited to a certain production run, then what impact it will have on safety and longevity of affected airframes.

But surprised? Nope, not by a long shot. Anyone who are genuinely surprised should perhaps use their Google powers; there's tons of information out there for anyone willing to spend a couple of minutes finding it.
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Ronaldo747
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 7:48 am

Folks, this is not that new. Southwest found this while adding scimitars two years ago. As noted ahead, already known on 767s, too.
 
WIederling
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 8:12 am

VSMUT wrote:
What, 35000 out of 90000 is heavily used?

if the 90k limit is heavily overstated ? :-))))

the forks seem to provide the force transfer path between wingbox and fuselage.

Does the inner or the outer spike show damage?
The floor beams ( where this attaches to are also the point where the two radii of the
upper and lower fuselage meet. Problematic to begin with.
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SEAflyer97
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 8:38 am

WIederling wrote:
VSMUT wrote:
What, 35000 out of 90000 is heavily used?

if the 90k limit is heavily overstated ? :-))))

the forks seem to provide the force transfer path between wingbox and fuselage.

Does the inner or the outer spike show damage?
The floor beams ( where this attaches to are also the point where the two radii of the
upper and lower fuselage meet. Problematic to begin with.


If the plane has 6 flight cycles a day and operates 360 days a year, 90k cycles gives you 41.6 years of lifespan.
 
mjoelnir
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 8:51 am

SEAflyer97 wrote:
WIederling wrote:
VSMUT wrote:
What, 35000 out of 90000 is heavily used?

if the 90k limit is heavily overstated ? :-))))

the forks seem to provide the force transfer path between wingbox and fuselage.

Does the inner or the outer spike show damage?
The floor beams ( where this attaches to are also the point where the two radii of the
upper and lower fuselage meet. Problematic to begin with.


If the plane has 6 flight cycles a day and operates 360 days a year, 90k cycles gives you 41.6 years of lifespan.


Yes, and if the plane has 6 flight cycles a day and operates 360 days a year, 35 K cycles gives 16.2 years. So there could be quite a few 737NG with this issue.
 
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zkojq
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 11:04 am

mjoelnir wrote:
SEAflyer97 wrote:
WIederling wrote:
if the 90k limit is heavily overstated ? :-))))

the forks seem to provide the force transfer path between wingbox and fuselage.

Does the inner or the outer spike show damage?
The floor beams ( where this attaches to are also the point where the two radii of the
upper and lower fuselage meet. Problematic to begin with.


If the plane has 6 flight cycles a day and operates 360 days a year, 90k cycles gives you 41.6 years of lifespan.


Yes, and if the plane has 6 flight cycles a day and operates 360 days a year, 35 K cycles gives 16.2 years. So there could be quite a few 737NG with this issue.


Most 737s aren't going to operate 360 days a year. Even so, if a select few 737s have to be retired or have some extra heavy maintenance checks at 35k cycles, it's not really a big deal. In the current age of low interest rates and cheap credit, plenty of 737NGs are being retired at that age already.
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WIederling
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 2:36 pm

SEAflyer97 wrote:
WIederling wrote:
VSMUT wrote:
What, 35000 out of 90000 is heavily used?

if the 90k limit is heavily overstated ? :-))))

the forks seem to provide the force transfer path between wingbox and fuselage.

Does the inner or the outer spike show damage?
The floor beams ( where this attaches to are also the point where the two radii of the
upper and lower fuselage meet. Problematic to begin with.


If the plane has 6 flight cycles a day and operates 360 days a year, 90k cycles gives you 41.6 years of lifespan.

we were talking about premature fatique @ 1/3 of design life and not about the superannuatednes of a frame that actually tries to "consume" those advertised for cycles.
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767333ER
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 6:22 pm

Granted a 737 probably won’t get used to 90000 cycles by its original operator, but it’s reasonable to expect them to use a 737 for somewhere around 70000 cycles. Having these parts corrode and crack as soon as 35000 cycles is having that happen at less than half of it’s useful service life. I don’t think they should be considered good for 90000 cycles at all.

No wonder American wants to retire their only 20 year old 737-800s.
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hiflyeras
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 8:10 pm

Heavy operators of the NG's are probably concerned. WN, AA and UA operate a large number of older NG's I assume? If this issue is widespread it could become quite disruptive to air travel worldwide.
 
n562wn
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737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 8:14 pm

hiflyeras wrote:
Heavy operators of the NG's are probably concerned. WN, AA and UA operate a large number of older NG's I assume? If this issue is widespread it could become quite disruptive to air travel worldwide.


Are AS and DL not heavy operators of NG's?
My statements do not represent my former employer or my current employer and are my opinions only.
 
Cubsrule
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 8:22 pm

n562wn wrote:
hiflyeras wrote:
Heavy operators of the NG's are probably concerned. WN, AA and UA operate a large number of older NG's I assume? If this issue is widespread it could become quite disruptive to air travel worldwide.


Are AS and DL not heavy operators of NG's?


AS and DL aren’t already playing from behind because of the MAX grounding, though.
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n562wn
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 8:24 pm

Cubsrule wrote:
n562wn wrote:
hiflyeras wrote:
Heavy operators of the NG's are probably concerned. WN, AA and UA operate a large number of older NG's I assume? If this issue is widespread it could become quite disruptive to air travel worldwide.


Are AS and DL not heavy operators of NG's?


AS and DL aren’t already playing from behind because of the MAX grounding, though.


Ahh. Fair point. Was just trying to better understand the comment.
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WildcatYXU
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 8:33 pm

How difficult is to inspect and eventually replace the pickle fork?
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1989worstyear
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 8:38 pm

How different are these NG assemblies compared to an older variant, like the -300 or or even Jurassic? Do they share any common parts of design features etc...?

I'm not well versed on the structures side of things.
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lightsaber
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 8:41 pm

FAA inspection ordered.

https://www.upi.com/amp/Top_News/US/201 ... 569693809/

A repair will be found. The A320 and A380 found cracks in wing structure. Bad, but not the end of the 737.

Lightsaber

Late edit
I found a link with skematics.

http://newsinflight.com/2019/09/28/boei ... g-not-max/
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kalvado
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 8:42 pm

WildcatYXU wrote:
How difficult is to inspect and eventually replace the pickle fork?

An article somewhere up the thread says that
Engineers say the inspection process itself is fairly straightforward and fast.

If I understand correctly, replacement of all pickle forks, along with multiple other systems, is done by replacing an aircraft with a newly built one. Repairs are likely doable, though, may require a lot of OEM support.
 
WIederling
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 9:05 pm

JAAlbert wrote:
My mom would be pissed if her silver pickle fork cracked, so I can just imagine how mad the airlines would be to find their pickle forks cracked! :duck:


to go with the sentiment of some posters:

No bother. the glass was empty anyways. :-))))))
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trex8
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 9:12 pm

Ronaldo747 wrote:
Folks, this is not that new. Southwest found this while adding scimitars two years ago. As noted ahead, already known on 767s, too.

Im not a technical type but unless there was a heavy check done as well at the same time how would adding scimitars result in checking something in the fuselage wall??
 
VSMUT
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 9:21 pm

1989worstyear wrote:
How different are these NG assemblies compared to an older variant, like the -300 or or even Jurassic? Do they share any common parts of design features etc...?

I'm not well versed on the structures side of things.


They are hopefully different, or at the very least, modified. Being a heavier and bigger aircraft, the forces exerted at the wing roots would be somewhat greater.
 
kalvado
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 9:25 pm

VSMUT wrote:
1989worstyear wrote:
How different are these NG assemblies compared to an older variant, like the -300 or or even Jurassic? Do they share any common parts of design features etc...?

I'm not well versed on the structures side of things.


They are hopefully different, or at the very least, modified. Being a heavier and bigger aircraft, the forces exerted at the wing roots would be somewhat greater.

a more interesting question is how things compare with MAX. MAX is heavier, so there is some reinforcement of structural elements. is that enough to make a difference for that particular part?
 
WIederling
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 9:34 pm

kalvado wrote:
VSMUT wrote:
1989worstyear wrote:
How different are these NG assemblies compared to an older variant, like the -300 or or even Jurassic? Do they share any common parts of design features etc...?

I'm not well versed on the structures side of things.


They are hopefully different, or at the very least, modified. Being a heavier and bigger aircraft, the forces exerted at the wing roots would be somewhat greater.

a more interesting question is how things compare with MAX. MAX is heavier, so there is some reinforcement of structural elements. is that enough to make a difference for that particular part?


"Poseidon's pitchfork" is in the force linkage path between fuselage and wingbox.
fuselage mass hasn't changed all that much, has it ?

What is the difference between Classic and NG?
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VSMUT
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 9:38 pm

kalvado wrote:
VSMUT wrote:
1989worstyear wrote:
How different are these NG assemblies compared to an older variant, like the -300 or or even Jurassic? Do they share any common parts of design features etc...?

I'm not well versed on the structures side of things.


They are hopefully different, or at the very least, modified. Being a heavier and bigger aircraft, the forces exerted at the wing roots would be somewhat greater.

a more interesting question is how things compare with MAX. MAX is heavier, so there is some reinforcement of structural elements. is that enough to make a difference for that particular part?


I'm not actually sure it means quite so much. Normally the issue is with upwards wing bending due to lift, and bigger, heavier engines should compensate for that. The wing area is pretty much unchanged after all.
 
hiflyeras
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 10:55 pm

n562wn wrote:
hiflyeras wrote:
Heavy operators of the NG's are probably concerned. WN, AA and UA operate a large number of older NG's I assume? If this issue is widespread it could become quite disruptive to air travel worldwide.


Are AS and DL not heavy operators of NG's?


They are but it's the age and in particular the cycles you have to be concerned about...and WN is flying 50+ airframes that are close to or over 20 years old. How many cycles does that equate to?

https://www.planespotters.net/airline/S ... t-Airlines
 
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Spacepope
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 11:07 pm

hiflyeras wrote:
n562wn wrote:
hiflyeras wrote:
Heavy operators of the NG's are probably concerned. WN, AA and UA operate a large number of older NG's I assume? If this issue is widespread it could become quite disruptive to air travel worldwide.


Are AS and DL not heavy operators of NG's?


They are but it's the age and in particular the cycles you have to be concerned about...and WN is flying 50+ airframes that are close to or over 20 years old. How many cycles does that equate to?

https://www.planespotters.net/airline/S ... t-Airlines

N700GS, line number 4 of the NG series, had over 44000 cycles earlier this year. 73000 hours.
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mga707
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 11:12 pm

WIederling wrote:

What is the difference between Classic and NG?


Big difference in the wing. -100 through -500 had basically the same wing. Different and longer wing on the NGs.
 
USAirKid
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 11:32 pm

Cubsrule wrote:
n562wn wrote:
hiflyeras wrote:
Heavy operators of the NG's are probably concerned. WN, AA and UA operate a large number of older NG's I assume? If this issue is widespread it could become quite disruptive to air travel worldwide.


Are AS and DL not heavy operators of NG's?


AS and DL aren’t already playing from behind because of the MAX grounding, though.


AS has 737MAXes on order and would have received them by now if it weren’t for the grounding.
 
Dalmd88
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sat Sep 28, 2019 11:45 pm

trex8 wrote:
Ronaldo747 wrote:
Folks, this is not that new. Southwest found this while adding scimitars two years ago. As noted ahead, already known on 767s, too.

Im not a technical type but unless there was a heavy check done as well at the same time how would adding scimitars result in checking something in the fuselage wall??

I would bet the winglet mod was done during a heavy mtc check. There is likely a lot of internal wing structural changes when installing the scimitars. So those kind of mods usually get done during heavy checks.

Finding cracked pickle forks is never a good thing. As others have said the 767 has had issues and I recall one DL 757 that we found cracked. It is a pretty big job. Let's hope it is just a one off issue and the AD doesn't turn up a slew of these.
 
foxtrotbravo21
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sun Sep 29, 2019 3:18 am

Still too early to speculate as we do not know the aircraft flying history. Heavy hard landings could have contributed too. We need more information first.
 
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zeke
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sun Sep 29, 2019 3:37 am

Lots of very dumb comparisons between this issue and issue on other aircraft.

The key terms are safe life and fail safe. Most aircraft load paths are designed to be fail safe, a crack will not result in a catastrophic failure, this would include fuselage skins and wings.

Other parts are designed for safe life, they are designed to exceed the life of the aircraft without redundant load paths, like landing gear and this pickle fork.

The consequences of a failure following crack growing of a safe life and fail safe components are very different.
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WIederling
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sun Sep 29, 2019 8:05 am

zeke wrote:
Other parts are designed for safe life, they are designed to exceed the life of the aircraft without redundant load paths, like landing gear and this pickle fork.

I'd put the pickle fork(s) in the fail safe area.?
there is a bunch of them distributed over the wingbox length ( every frame there seem to have one).
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WIederling
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sun Sep 29, 2019 9:16 am

mga707 wrote:
WIederling wrote:

What is the difference between Classic and NG?


Big difference in the wing. -100 through -500 had basically the same wing. Different and longer wing on the NGs.


Is this in a way another case/kind of grandfathering fallout then?
( fuselage and wingbox did not change from Classic to NG, established functional design. can be kept as is.)
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WIederling
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sun Sep 29, 2019 9:19 am

WIederling wrote:
zeke wrote:
Other parts are designed for safe life, they are designed to exceed the life of the aircraft without redundant load paths, like landing gear and this pickle fork.

I'd put the pickle fork(s) in the fail safe area.?
there is a bunch of them distributed over the wingbox length ( every frame there seem to have one).

I may have misinterpreted the available 3d drawing !?
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RickNRoll
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sun Sep 29, 2019 11:13 am

lightsaber wrote:
FAA inspection ordered.

https://www.upi.com/amp/Top_News/US/201 ... 569693809/

A repair will be found. The A320 and A380 found cracks in wing structure. Bad, but not the end of the 737.

Lightsaber

Late edit
I found a link with skematics.

http://newsinflight.com/2019/09/28/boei ... g-not-max/


According to Boeing engineers, the ‘pickle forks’ are designed to last the lifetime of the plane with at least 90,000 flight cycles of landings and takeoffs.


So that is where the problem is. It is supposed to last for 90,000 cycles but already has to be repaired at only 1/3 of it's life.
 
RickNRoll
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sun Sep 29, 2019 11:15 am

zeke wrote:
Lots of very dumb comparisons between this issue and issue on other aircraft.

The key terms are safe life and fail safe. Most aircraft load paths are designed to be fail safe, a crack will not result in a catastrophic failure, this would include fuselage skins and wings.

Other parts are designed for safe life, they are designed to exceed the life of the aircraft without redundant load paths, like landing gear and this pickle fork.

The consequences of a failure following crack growing of a safe life and fail safe components are very different.

What is the difference? Can you spelll it out for the hard of hearing here?
 
kalvado
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sun Sep 29, 2019 12:04 pm

RickNRoll wrote:
zeke wrote:
Lots of very dumb comparisons between this issue and issue on other aircraft.

The key terms are safe life and fail safe. Most aircraft load paths are designed to be fail safe, a crack will not result in a catastrophic failure, this would include fuselage skins and wings.

Other parts are designed for safe life, they are designed to exceed the life of the aircraft without redundant load paths, like landing gear and this pickle fork.

The consequences of a failure following crack growing of a safe life and fail safe components are very different.

What is the difference? Can you spelll it out for the hard of hearing here?

Fail-safe vs safe-life design philosophies are the issue.
Fail-safe means that component may fail - but this will not lead to a catastrophic failure of design. A failure may - and generally should - exhibit itself in some way, it may disrupt normal operation, but there should be a pre-designed mitigation path. Think about engine failure when aircraft has to divert, but can still o that on another engine(s); or elevator brakes which deploy when there is a risk of cabin fall. Or, closer to everyday life, if you live in US typical wooden frame home - one stud in a wall may rot and crack. That doesn't mean the home will collapse, there are more studs to bear the load until repairs are done.
safe-life means that component is safe for that long; in case of pickle fork - for as long as aircraft is servicable. Usually such approach applies in situations where failure means imminent catastrophic failure. Failure of one of 4 forks may mean wing literally falling off - no divert, no options.
Within same "we still have another engine!" approach, some failures are permissible - contained failures, e.g. fan blades. Others, like turbine disks failures, may result in too serious trouble (think AA 767 in ORD). Again, disks are inspected on engine maintenance - but expected to last until next inspection, no excuses.
Some life-safe components are designed to be replaceable and should be replaced at certain intervals, a few times over service life of a plane. For some parts, this interval is a full service life - part is normally replaced with the rest of an airframe. There is, probably, no design consideration of how replacement is done - it should never happen, period. With some safety factor built into that "never".

So such cracking in a life-safe part means repair may be very difficult, and part itself is critical - failure is not an option. If it is just a bad batch, then some planes may become bear cans and parts donors earlier than planned, not that bad. If this is a design issue, things are more interesting.
 
WIederling
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Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sun Sep 29, 2019 12:39 pm

kalvado wrote:
So such cracking in a life-safe part means repair may be very difficult, and part itself is critical - failure is not an option. If it is just a bad batch, then some planes may become bear cans and parts donors earlier than planned, not that bad. If this is a design issue, things are more interesting.


do we know anything about the distribution of cycles achieved in the NG cohort of frames?
the oldest NGs are about +-20 years old. EIS in Dec. 1997 with 3 deliveries in that year.
Murphy is an optimist
 
Weatherwatcher1
Posts: 266
Joined: Sun Mar 03, 2019 5:14 pm

Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sun Sep 29, 2019 1:33 pm

1989worstyear wrote:
How different are these NG assemblies compared to an older variant, like the -300 or or even Jurassic? Do they share any common parts of design features etc...?

I'm not well versed on the structures side of things.


The 737NG has a new bigger wing and thicker fuselage skin since the plane was designed to fly higher, faster and farther. Thicker skin was needed when the airplane max altitude (service ceiling) was raised from 37,000ft to 41,000 feet. The thicker skin and higher payload resulted in loads changing through the entire fuselage structure. The 737NG was also developed in CATIA unlike airplanes from the 1980s. On the structure side it is very different.
 
WIederling
Posts: 8888
Joined: Sun Sep 13, 2015 2:15 pm

Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sun Sep 29, 2019 2:08 pm

Weatherwatcher1 wrote:
The thicker skin and higher payload resulted in loads changing through the entire fuselage structure. The 737NG was also developed in CATIA unlike airplanes from the 1980s. On the structure side it is very different.


A new plane. As the name says :-))
Murphy is an optimist
 
Flashy16
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Sep 29, 2019 10:55 am

Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sun Sep 29, 2019 2:13 pm

Is this enough of an issue that I should change by flight from a 737 -800 to a CRJ900 on Wednesday? Is there any chance inspections will have started by then? Also, is a 737-900ER considered a NG? Thank you!!
 
Natflyer
Posts: 639
Joined: Fri Oct 11, 2013 9:29 pm

Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sun Sep 29, 2019 3:18 pm

Flashy16 wrote:
Is this enough of an issue that I should change by flight from a 737 -800 to a CRJ900 on Wednesday? Is there any chance inspections will have started by then? Also, is a 737-900ER considered a NG? Thank you!!


Yes, I suggest you just walk, or take a boat. :roll:
 
Flashy16
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Sep 29, 2019 10:55 am

Re: 737NG Pickle fork issue

Sun Sep 29, 2019 3:31 pm

Sorry, I did not phrase my question right....I am not very good at forums! Not looking to cancel my flight! Just wondering if I should change from a 737-800 to another type leaving at a similar time. Just concerned whether this is a big enough issue to make a change. Sorry again, thank you.

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