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MartijnNL
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Fri Oct 18, 2019 3:31 pm

TheWorm123 wrote:
How Jet2 became LS would be interesting

See reply 32.

jomur wrote:
Jet2 is LS which is the first part of the post code (zip code) in Leeds where its headquarters are.
 
TheWorm123
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Fri Oct 18, 2019 4:06 pm

MartijnNL wrote:
TheWorm123 wrote:
How Jet2 became LS would be interesting

See reply 32.

jomur wrote:
Jet2 is LS which is the first part of the post code (zip code) in Leeds where its headquarters are.

Ah thank you
B757-200 B757-300 A330-200 A321-200 B737-800
 
Swiss4Ever
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Fri Oct 18, 2019 6:14 pm

Jalap wrote:
conaly wrote:
LX for Swiss came from Crossair. After the downfall of Swissair (SR) the whole operation of the airline has been transferred to Crossair, which continued with the new name Swiss.

I wonder why Swiss didn't take the code SR.
After all, when Sabena went under, SN Brussels Airlines was formed out of the existing DAT. DAT had QG as code, but took over the SN code when they first became SN Brussels Airlines. Later the SN was dropped from the airline name, but SN still is the airline code.
I assume that Crossair/Swiss could also have taken the well known SR code. Strange that they just kept LX...


After years of watching and months of joining, my first post:

LX as it is today is the legal successor of the former Crossair (LX). When Swissair (SR) went bankrupt, they had huge debts. So the new company had to make sure that they could not be held responsible for those debts. They had to make sure that there are no legal connections between the new LX and SR. They had several lawyers to take care of this. If the new LX would have taken the SR code, some could interpret that as a legal connection between those two companies. So they avoided that by just keeping the LX code.
 
workhorse
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Fri Oct 18, 2019 7:11 pm

VTCIE wrote:
Of course we have the famous AK (AirAsia), CX, CZ, EK, EY, MH, PR, QF, SQ, SV, TG, etc. where the first letter of the code matches the first letter of the airline, but the second letter is very random.


MH likely stands for "Mǎláixīyà Hángkōng" (or "Mǎ Háng" in short version) which means "Malaysia Airlines" in Chinese.
 
VTCIE
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Sat Oct 19, 2019 8:36 am

workhorse wrote:
VTCIE wrote:
Of course we have the famous AK (AirAsia), CX, CZ, EK, EY, MH, PR, QF, SQ, SV, TG, etc. where the first letter of the code matches the first letter of the airline, but the second letter is very random.

MH likely stands for "Mǎláixīyà Hángkōng" (or "Mǎ Háng" in short version) which means "Malaysia Airlines" in Chinese.

Bahasa Malaysia is a much more important language than Chinese there. I do not know why Malaysia Airlines will go for a Chinese acronym.
 
Airdolomiti
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Sat Oct 19, 2019 9:20 am

VTCIE wrote:
Among non-Indian airlines, some interesting codes that have no explanation that I know of are as follows (plenty of Chinese airlines like GS, HO, JD, MF and PN):
  • AT: Royal Air Maroc
    [...]

Of course we have the famous AK (AirAsia), CX, CZ, EK, EY, MH, PR, QF, SQ, SV, TG, etc. where the first letter of the code matches the first letter of the airline, but the second letter is very random. Then there is the reverse case; the second letter makes sense but not the first:
    [...]
  • YM: Montenegro Airlines[...]


Wild guesses: AT as in the Atlas Mountains in Morocco, and YM for "Yugoslavia" and "Montenegro" (as YM was founded by/in what was at the time the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia)?
 
raylee67
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Sat Oct 19, 2019 10:08 am

VTCIE wrote:
Of course we have the famous AK (AirAsia), CX, CZ, EK, EY, MH, PR, QF, SQ, SV, TG, etc. where the first letter of the code matches the first letter of the airline, but the second letter is very random. Then there is the reverse case; the second letter makes sense but not the first:


Also KE, not sure why Korean Air did not choose KA, as KA was obviously available when Korean was founded, although the name of the airline was Korean National Airline, not Korean Air, at that time.

The current TG is a result of merger between Thai Airways International (TG) and Thai Airways (TH) back in the 1980s. TG was established to fly international and TH was the domestic airline.

When TG was established, it was probably used for the International one because TH was already used for the domestic airline, so they picked the alphabet before H. When the two merged, TG was retained, probably because it has more recognition globally.
319/20/21 332/33 342/43/45 359/51 388 707 717 732/36/3G/38/39 74R/42/43/44/4E/48 757 762/63 772/7L/73/7W 788/89 D10 M80 135/40/45 175/90 DH1/4 CRJ/R7 L10
AY LH OU SR BA FI
AA DL UA NW AC CP WS FL NK PD
CI NH SQ KA CX JL BR OZ TG KE CA CZ NZ JQ RS
 
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ClassicLover
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Sat Oct 19, 2019 4:30 pm

A fun fact is that when Qantas first started operating jets in 1959, their code was EM. Why? Qantas EMpire Airways was the official name of the airline. I presume they switched to QF later in the 1960s when the airline was renamed to just Qantas Airways.
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tomgle
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Sun Oct 20, 2019 12:21 pm

I've heard that Ryanair's FR comes from Fly Ryanair. Not sure why they didn't go with something else like RY though, seems that's currently assigned to a Chinese low-cost called Jiangxi Air which was only established in 2016.
 
VTCIE
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Sun Oct 20, 2019 12:35 pm

raylee67 wrote:
VTCIE wrote:
Of course we have the famous AK (AirAsia), CX, CZ, EK, EY, MH, PR, QF, SQ, SV, TG, etc. where the first letter of the code matches the first letter of the airline, but the second letter is very random. Then there is the reverse case; the second letter makes sense but not the first:


Also KE, not sure why Korean Air did not choose KA, as KA was obviously available when Korean was founded, although the name of the airline was Korean National Airline, not Korean Air, at that time.

The current TG is a result of merger between Thai Airways International (TG) and Thai Airways (TH) back in the 1980s. TG was established to fly international and TH was the domestic airline.

When TG was established, it was probably used for the International one because TH was already used for the domestic airline, so they picked the alphabet before H. When the two merged, TG was retained, probably because it has more recognition globally.

With several countries, the flag carrier’s code is different from the country code, but makes equal sense for the country.
South Africa: ZA; South African Airways: SA (SA is used for Saudi Arabia).*
South Korea: KR; Korean Air: KE (KE is used for Kenya).
Turkey: TR; Turkish Airlines: TK (TK is used for Tokelau).

Perhaps: China: CN; Air China: CA and China Airlines: CI. Though CA fits Canada better. Also, the Ivorians would probably be more well-accustomed to CI (Côte d’Ivoire) than IC (Ivory Coast), especially as the French name is displacing the English name in most contexts.

In many cases both are the same: VN for Vietnam (Airlines), ET for Ethiopia(n Airlines), FJ for Fiji (Airways), etc.

*Far many more people use SA to refer to South Africa than Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia is more commonly called KSA (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia). Similarly, South Africa has RSA (Republic of South Africa), but this is increasingly obsolete. On A.net, SA can also mean South America, as seen in the Delta–LATAM thread.
 
rbavfan
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:10 pm

ushermittwoch wrote:
71Zulu wrote:
STLflyer wrote:
Always wondered where WN comes from, anyone know?
The reverse of Northwest?


Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk



Wouldn't that be Southeast?



He was wondering where it came from in terms of WN vs getting SW. SW was already in use.
 
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:13 pm

hpff wrote:
Some of these may be lost to time. For instance, the internet says America West’s HP stood for Hawaiian Pacific Airlines, which apparently was a fraud, or also potentially “hub Phoenix.” But nothing confirmable.


In the early years companies got their initials as they were avaialble. Now there are few open codes so you do not get a match to your name. They don't create one based on cute name combo's like "Hub Phoenix". They just give you a choice of 2 and you pick the one that sounds best.

Mind you it does fit well with "Hot Plane"
Last edited by rbavfan on Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
rbavfan
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:15 pm

N766UA wrote:
STLflyer wrote:
Always wondered where WN comes from, anyone know?


You’re being sarcastic, right? Isn’t WN like world-famously “We’re Nuts?” Airplane dork 101!


LOL. You win today's best line.
 
GZM1
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Sun Oct 20, 2019 3:53 pm

winter wrote:
Fly-K wrote:
Any idea why…
...the K in EK?
...Y in EY?
...Q in SQ?
...X in CX?

Singapore’s SQ comes from “Service Quality”.

There is another theory: “Sweet hostess in your sarong kebaya, caring for me as only you know how, across half the world and more, Singapore girl you are a great way to fly!” Perhaps you have guessed it already: “Suzy Q, baby I love you, oh, Suzie Q!”
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winter
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:08 pm

GZM1 wrote:
winter wrote:
Fly-K wrote:
Any idea why…
...the K in EK?
...Y in EY?
...Q in SQ?
...X in CX?

Singapore’s SQ comes from “Superior Quality”.

There is another theory: “Sweet hostess in your sarong kebaya, caring for me as only you know how, across half the world and more, Singapore girl you are a great way to fly!” Perhaps you have guessed it already: “Suzy Q, baby I love you, oh, Suzie Q!”


Nice try, but SQ standing for Superior Quality is quoted from SQ’s first Chairman, Lin Chin Beng.
 
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:17 pm

Idiosyncratic?
 
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PPVLC
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:34 pm

[url][/url]
PB26 wrote:
VARIG's RG came from Rio Grande do Sul, the company birthstate


Yes, Viacao Aerea Riograndense gave us RG -from the RS state. Cruzeiro was SC because of its original name Servicos Aereos Cruzeiro do Sul.
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scbriml
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:34 pm

I think some of you are expecting way too much from a two letter code. There are only so many codes that could possibly make sense that it's inevitable airlines are using 'illogical' or 'inexplicable' ones.
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good2go
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Sun Oct 20, 2019 4:42 pm

What I was told once upon a time as a new-hire was that B6 code for JetBlue came from Blue (obvious) and 6 (the terminal JetBlue originally operated out of at JFK)
 
gunnerman
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Sun Oct 20, 2019 8:05 pm

I was wondering about a related subject: which IATA code is used more often than the name of the airline? I almost always hear peope say BA instead of British Airways (although I've heard Americans say "British").
 
PB26
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Sun Oct 20, 2019 11:08 pm

PPVLC wrote:
[url][/url]
PB26 wrote:
VARIG's RG came from Rio Grande do Sul, the company birthstate


Yes, Viacao Aerea Riograndense gave us RG -from the RS state. Cruzeiro was SC because of its original name Servicos Aereos Cruzeiro do Sul.


Cruzeiro's SC may came from above, Southern Cross (the english translation for Cruzeiro do Sul) or Syndicato Condor, the SC's original name when the company was set up.
Rio and all South America by Panair do Brasil’s jets.
 
69bug
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Mon Oct 21, 2019 7:20 am

skipness1E wrote:
MO11 wrote:
[list=][/list]
69bug wrote:
Fedex was FM and FX was the code for German Cargo up to the late 90s. I believe a deal was made and Lufthansa Cargo took over FM and Fedex got (bought?) FX.

bug


Federal Express had MB between FM and FX.

Think it went MB, to FM then FX?
The callsign also changed from “Express” to “FedEx”.


I worked with Fedex up to around '96. They were still FM. Shortly after that they went to FX. Maybe MB was much earlier.

bug
 
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bwest
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Mon Oct 21, 2019 7:32 am

PANAMsterdam wrote:
Brussels Airlines uses SN, which comes from their predecessor SABENA that went bankrupt shortly after 9/11. Maybe Brussels Airlines can buy the IATA code from Eva Air :lol:

And Sabena got the SN code as a nod to its predecessor, SNETA, which was founded on March 31 1919.

If we apply BA logic to that, it would mean Brussels Airlines could have also celebrated its centennial this year, even before BA and KL did... :)
 
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Mon Oct 21, 2019 7:40 am

Stupidly-inaccurate post by me. Deleted it.
Last edited by wjcandee on Mon Oct 21, 2019 7:47 am, edited 1 time in total.
 
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Mon Oct 21, 2019 7:41 am

gunnerman wrote:
I was wondering about a related subject: which IATA code is used more often than the name of the airline? I almost always hear peope say BA instead of British Airways (although I've heard Americans say "British").


AA
 
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scbriml
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Mon Oct 21, 2019 7:42 am

gunnerman wrote:
I was wondering about a related subject: which IATA code is used more often than the name of the airline? I almost always hear peope say BA instead of British Airways (although I've heard Americans say "British").


Far more likely that they're just using it as an abbreviation rather than it coincidentally being the IATA code.
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justbala
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Mon Oct 21, 2019 8:38 am

In case of Jet Airways - if you turn the W clockwise by 90 degrees.. the 9 and W would kinda look like the flying sun logo they had on the aircraft tails.

The S2 of Jetlite is from the days when it was owned by Sahara. "2" is almost like a mirror image of S.
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Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

Mon Oct 21, 2019 8:45 am

OlafW wrote:
Trying to find some connections here
VTCIE wrote:

  • MT: Thomas Cook Airlines (R.I.P.) - already from the pre-predecessor Flying Colours. I guess it's related to having headquarters in Manchester


    Some wild guesses, but maybe some of them do match


    Guess was too wild. Reality is much more mundane!

    Article is worth a read for the background to Thomas Cook's appearance on the airline scene from its travel agency days.

    http://www.travelweekly.co.uk/articles/ ... 2-feb-2007
     
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    conaly
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    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Mon Oct 21, 2019 9:21 am

    Anyone any idea, how Air Koryo, the North Korean carrier, got it's JS-code?
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    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Mon Oct 21, 2019 10:10 am

    VTCIE wrote:
    Can anyone explain LY (El Al)


    The etymology is from the original name of TLV Airport, Lydda before being named for PM Ben Gurion.

    Initially, EL AL linked Tel Aviv with major European cities — Paris, London, Rome and Zurich. It operated from the Tel Aviv airport originally named ‘Lydda’, which was soon renamed ‘Lod’ and later named ‘Ben-Gurion Airport’ in honor of Israel’s first Prime Minister. The ‘LY’ airline code for EL AL flights actually derives from ‘Lydda’, as ‘EA’ was already in use by Eastern Air Lines.


    https://www.israelairlinemuseum.org/el- ... history-2/
     
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    Phosphorus
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    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Mon Oct 21, 2019 11:58 am

    conaly wrote:
    Anyone any idea, how Air Koryo, the North Korean carrier, got it's JS-code?

    Juche Songun? No, I'm joking.

    Most probably, Joseon, ancient name for Korea, might have something to do with this.
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    Aircellist
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    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Mon Oct 21, 2019 4:27 pm

    And a thought for Air Inter (IT)…
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    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Mon Oct 21, 2019 7:35 pm

    gunnerman wrote:
    I was wondering about a related subject: which IATA code is used more often than the name of the airline? I almost always hear peope say BA instead of British Airways (although I've heard Americans say "British").


    S7 :bouncy:
     
    lalib
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    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Mon Oct 21, 2019 8:16 pm

    Dragon air - KA where did they get that from?

    As someone mentioned before the earlier established airlines got the best represented codes, so far the ones not mentioned PK, AI, JL, GF, TK, LH,
     
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    OA940
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    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Mon Oct 21, 2019 8:56 pm

    Is there a chance some of these are being overanalyzed? Like, I could also say Aegean's 3 comes from the fact that Greece is kind of a crossroads between 3 continents, or how the F in QF means flight or whatever people seem to think, but I think apart from those who inherited codes from mergers or stuff of the sort and a few others airline codes are just randomly assigned.
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    BirdBrain
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    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Mon Oct 21, 2019 9:34 pm

    EK probably took inspiration from PK, which was a big part of it's initial days.

    As for SQ, is makes sense for it to be Singaporean/Service Quality (SQ) when compared to MH (Malaysian Hospitality). Just my guess though, reality may be different.

    These days though, it is more down to making best use of what's available. Love some of the back stories in this thread whether it's true or not.
     
    metaldirtnskin
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    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Mon Oct 21, 2019 10:35 pm

    OA940 wrote:
    Is there a chance some of these are being overanalyzed? Like, I could also say Aegean's 3 comes from the fact that Greece is kind of a crossroads between 3 continents, or how the F in QF means flight or whatever people seem to think, but I think apart from those who inherited codes from mergers or stuff of the sort and a few others airline codes are just randomly assigned.


    There's a good chance a lot of these are real anecdotes repeated by people at the various airlines, but are nevertheless not true - basically a story that someone told a newbie somewhere back in the mists of time, that got passed down and eventually became enshrined as the truth. Every company has things like that lurking in its corporate culture.

    In some cases the real story can be figured out, in others we'll probably never know. It's a fun thread anyway.
     
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    TheDailyAloy
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    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Tue Oct 22, 2019 2:56 am

    Yes, I've also wondered for a long time how Philippine Airlines became PR. There's no R in the country's name at all, only in "Airlines", and its ICAO code is PAL. Quick research I performed assigns PH (our ISO code) to Polynesian Airlines/Samoa Airways (now OL) and Transavia Denmark - both of which are younger than PR and were established post-IATA code launching.
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    AVFCdownunder
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    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Tue Oct 22, 2019 6:01 am

    Re the earlier query about Thomas Cook, I believe they acquired MT after taking over MyTravel's flight operations when they went under.
     
    GZM1
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    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Thu Oct 24, 2019 3:23 pm

    I forgot to mention that the code GK was originally assigned to a greek airline, predecessor of Olympic, TAE. (Technical and Aeronautical Exploitations), obviously for being GreeK. It is interesting to know that the code went to Laker in 1966...
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    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Thu Oct 24, 2019 3:55 pm

    Aircellist wrote:
    And a thought for Air Inter (IT)…

    Which became Kingfisher, which is now Tigerair Taiwan. In the IndAv thread Kingfisher is always erroneously called KF, not IT. KF is used by Air Belgium and formerly by Blue1 of Finland (a micro-Star Alliance member), which CityJet bought from SK and killed off.
     
    Xcarrier
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    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Thu Oct 24, 2019 4:29 pm

    VTCIE wrote:
    [*]OU: Croatia Airlines (they could have chosen HR, following Austrian’s lead in choosing OS)


    OU having been used, until its collapse in 1974, by Luton UK based cOUrt line.
     
    Gangurru
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    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Thu Oct 24, 2019 7:34 pm

    VTCIE wrote:
    DT: TAAG Angolan Airlines


    TAAG can trace its history back to 1938. It flew as DTA Divisao dos Transportes Aereos until 1973. This explains their code.

    Prior to numerical options in the code, there was a maximum of 676 codes (26 x 26). As there were more airlines than that, in most cases airlines took what was available.

    Because of limited code availability, it’s also possible to have the same code for airlines that fly in completely different parts of the world. For example NC is Cobham in Australia and Northern Cargo in the Americas. Amongst other things, Cobham flies Qantas’s 717s.
     
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    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Fri Oct 25, 2019 10:56 am

    If I may chime in regarding MT, it has nothing to do with My Travel and goes all the way back to the days of Flying Colours, it remained as their IATA code througout their time as JMC and later Thomas Cook. The fact it remained following the merger with MyTravel was purely a fortunate coincidence. Incidentally MyTravel used VZ which they inherited when they rebranded from Airtours.

    On the charter airline front Air Europe were fortunate with the timing of their 1979 launch as Air Ceylon ceased operations that same year and thus relinquished thier AE identifier...

    I will always think of ZB for Monarch rather than OM, I don't know whay they changed it. I am currently working on their history for an upcoming episode of my "Grounded" series and can not find any reference to it to indicate why they changed. I understand that they used the 2 letter code publically for their "scheduled/Crown Service" flights and the 3 letter MON for regular charter flights but think the change happened later.

    The codes do not always make sense,

    JN - Sabre / Excel / XL Airways
    DP - Air 2000
    7L - AB Airlines
    MV - Air UK Leisure (Incidentally Air UK got the rather apt "UK")
    B3 - Ambassador
    5W - Astraeus
    PL - Buzz
    2G - Debonair

    There are some which were inherited through mergers & rebrands, like the previously mentioned MT.

    There are also some clever ones which you might have to think about like VS Virgin Atlantic AirwayS ;)

    Phil
    FlyingColours - *Not MyTravel ;)
    Lifes a train racing towards you, now you can either run away or grab a chair & a beer and watch it come - Phil
     
    clipperlondon
    Posts: 82
    Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2019 4:43 pm

    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Fri Oct 25, 2019 11:26 am

    santi319 wrote:
    To be clear, MS makes sense for Arabic speakers as Masr is the name for Egypt in Arabic.


    Misr, surely? I asked the question of both the gate agent at LHR and the FA on the flight to Cairo in 1982. They both said Misr is Egypt in Arabic.
     
    clipperlondon
    Posts: 82
    Joined: Sun Jan 27, 2019 4:43 pm

    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Fri Oct 25, 2019 11:38 am

    clipperlondon wrote:
    santi319 wrote:
    To be clear, MS makes sense for Arabic speakers as Masr is the name for Egypt in Arabic.


    Misr, surely? I asked the question of both the gate agent at LHR and the FA on the flight to Cairo in 1982. They both said Misr is Egypt in Arabic.


    CORRECTION! lol I said Misr is Arabic for Egypt. In EGYPTIAN ARABIC it is Masr. Apologies!
     
    santi319
    Posts: 1002
    Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 3:24 pm

    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Fri Oct 25, 2019 4:35 pm

    clipperlondon wrote:
    clipperlondon wrote:
    santi319 wrote:
    To be clear, MS makes sense for Arabic speakers as Masr is the name for Egypt in Arabic.


    Misr, surely? I asked the question of both the gate agent at LHR and the FA on the flight to Cairo in 1982. They both said Misr is Egypt in Arabic.


    CORRECTION! lol I said Misr is Arabic for Egypt. In EGYPTIAN ARABIC it is Masr. Apologies!

    In Levant Arabic we also say Masr!

    Its just the accent! Potato - potatoe
     
    sierra3tango
    Posts: 587
    Joined: Fri Mar 08, 2013 1:59 pm

    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Fri Oct 25, 2019 6:42 pm

    When BOAC started commercial operations after the 2nd World War their code was BO (as in body odour), for some reason it was changed a few years later.
     
    nry
    Posts: 115
    Joined: Tue Aug 20, 2013 11:42 pm

    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Fri Oct 25, 2019 6:44 pm

    leftcoast8 wrote:
    Icelandair's code of FI comes from the predecessor of Flugfélag Íslands (literally "Iceland Airlines"), which merged with Loftleiðir in 1979 to create the modern day Icelandair.


    Are you sure FI wasn't for Fish Importing?
    B727, B737, B747, B757, B767, B777, B787, DC9/MD80, DC10, MD11
    A319, A320 (+neo), A321, A330, A340
    L1011
    ATR77, CRJ200, CRJ700, E145, E170, E175
     
    superjeff
    Posts: 1356
    Joined: Fri Feb 05, 2010 2:14 am

    Re: History behind idiosyncratic IATA airline shortcodes

    Fri Oct 25, 2019 7:36 pm

    STLflyer wrote:
    Always wondered where WN comes from, anyone know?


    actually, when they started operations (1971??), the code "SW" wasn't available, so they just took what was. There's no hidden meaning to their code.

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