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dcajet
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45 years ago today. the first 747 fatal accident

Thu Nov 21, 2019 2:56 am

Lufthansa Flight 540 was a scheduled commercial flight operated with a Boeing 747-130, D-ABYB "Hessen" carrying 157 people (140 passengers and 17 crew members). The flight was operating the final segment of its Frankfurt–Nairobi–Johannesburg route. On 20 November 1974 it crashed and caught fire shortly past the runway after taking off from Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi.

It was carrying 140 passengers and 17 crew, 55 passengers and 4 crew perished in the accident. The German registrations D-ABYA through D-ABYU were re-assigned for Lufthansa's new fleet of 747-8, starting in 2012. The D-ABYB registration, however, was not used again and skipped over.

Aircraft accident report: https://aviation-safety.net/database/re ... 19741120-0
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crownvic
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Re: 45 years ago today. the first 747 fatal accident

Thu Nov 21, 2019 5:00 am

It is quite amazing how many jets have crashed with fatal results, for failing to deploy leading edge slats (during t/o) and how long it took manufacturers to devise systems to prevent this from happening further.
 
Max Q
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Re: 45 years ago today. the first 747 fatal accident

Thu Nov 21, 2019 8:09 am

crownvic wrote:
It is quite amazing how many jets have crashed with fatal results, for failing to deploy leading edge slats (during t/o) and how long it took manufacturers to devise systems to prevent this from happening further.



Slats / leading edge devices contribute an enormous amount of lift, I’d rather lose trailing edge flaps than slats if I had a failure to deploy


Certain aircraft seem to do well without them however, such as the F15 with its enormous thrust reserves and Gulfstream business jets with their oversized wings


Jets without slats such as the DC9-10 and the Challenger have also proven to be uniquely vulnerable to icing contamination
The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.


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uta999
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Re: 45 years ago today. the first 747 fatal accident

Thu Nov 21, 2019 8:26 am

Didn’t the BEA Trident Papa India crash near Staines after departing LHR, because the slats were retracted in error Just after gear up?

The captain didn’t notice because he was having a heart attack.
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cathay747
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Re: 45 years ago today. the first 747 fatal accident

Thu Nov 21, 2019 3:03 pm

uta999 wrote:
Didn’t the BEA Trident Papa India crash near Staines after departing LHR, because the slats were retracted in error Just after gear up?

The captain didn’t notice because he was having a heart attack.


Yes. I don't recall the full story in detail, but the bottom line was that the F/O retracted the "droops" as they're called on the Trident prior to reaching the minimum-safe required airspeed to normally do so and they stalled. The captain's heart attack was felt to have played a role but I forget the details.
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billsalton92
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Re: 45 years ago today. the first 747 fatal accident

Thu Nov 21, 2019 7:02 pm

cathay747 wrote:
uta999 wrote:
Didn’t the BEA Trident Papa India crash near Staines after departing LHR, because the slats were retracted in error Just after gear up?

The captain didn’t notice because he was having a heart attack.


Yes. I don't recall the full story in detail, but the bottom line was that the F/O retracted the "droops" as they're called on the Trident prior to reaching the minimum-safe required airspeed to normally do so and they stalled. The captain's heart attack was felt to have played a role but I forget the details.


Postmortem showed a heart attack had occured at some point around the time the droops were raised, but because the Trident was not equipped with a CVR, it will never be known if Key commanded them to be raised, or if he raised them himself. They were around 63kts below minimum clean speed, but because of Key's violent and dictorial personality, neither the F/O, the pilot monitoring, or the deadheading captain in the flightdeck dare question him.
 
n729pa
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Re: 45 years ago today. the first 747 fatal accident

Thu Nov 21, 2019 10:53 pm

dcajet wrote:
Lufthansa Flight 540 was a scheduled commercial flight operated with a Boeing 747-130, D-ABYB "Hessen" carrying 157 people (140 passengers and 17 crew members). The flight was operating the final segment of its Frankfurt–Nairobi–Johannesburg route. On 20 November 1974 it crashed and caught fire shortly past the runway after taking off from Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi.

It was carrying 140 passengers and 17 crew, 55 passengers and 4 crew perished in the accident. The German registrations D-ABYA through D-ABYU were re-assigned for Lufthansa's new fleet of 747-8, starting in 2012. The D-ABYB registration, however, was not used again and skipped over.

Aircraft accident report: https://aviation-safety.net/database/re ... 19741120-0


There is a book written by one of the survivors and talk about various passengers and their trips prior to the accident, how they survived and what happened afterwards, very interesting book written in the immediate aftermath.
 
juliuswong
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Re: 45 years ago today. the first 747 fatal accident

Fri Nov 22, 2019 12:48 am

n729pa wrote:
dcajet wrote:
Lufthansa Flight 540 was a scheduled commercial flight operated with a Boeing 747-130, D-ABYB "Hessen" carrying 157 people (140 passengers and 17 crew members). The flight was operating the final segment of its Frankfurt–Nairobi–Johannesburg route. On 20 November 1974 it crashed and caught fire shortly past the runway after taking off from Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi.

It was carrying 140 passengers and 17 crew, 55 passengers and 4 crew perished in the accident. The German registrations D-ABYA through D-ABYU were re-assigned for Lufthansa's new fleet of 747-8, starting in 2012. The D-ABYB registration, however, was not used again and skipped over.

Aircraft accident report: https://aviation-safety.net/database/re ... 19741120-0


There is a book written by one of the survivors and talk about various passengers and their trips prior to the accident, how they survived and what happened afterwards, very interesting book written in the immediate aftermath.

For those who are interested, the book title is Wake Up, It's A Crash! The Story Of The First 747 Jet Disaster. A Survivor's Account by Moorhouse, Earl (1982).

https://www.amazon.com/Crash-Story-Disa ... 0552119326
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PSAatSAN4Ever
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Re: 45 years ago today. the first 747 fatal accident

Fri Nov 22, 2019 5:08 am

Does anyone know the seat location of the survivors? I've never found any sources of information of this on this flight or Avianca 011.

A sad history of planes trying to take-off improperly trimmed, from this to Northwest 255 to Spanair 5022.
 
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cathay747
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Re: 45 years ago today. the first 747 fatal accident

Fri Nov 22, 2019 1:57 pm

billsalton92 wrote:
cathay747 wrote:
uta999 wrote:
Didn’t the BEA Trident Papa India crash near Staines after departing LHR, because the slats were retracted in error Just after gear up?

The captain didn’t notice because he was having a heart attack.


Yes. I don't recall the full story in detail, but the bottom line was that the F/O retracted the "droops" as they're called on the Trident prior to reaching the minimum-safe required airspeed to normally do so and they stalled. The captain's heart attack was felt to have played a role but I forget the details.


Postmortem showed a heart attack had occured at some point around the time the droops were raised, but because the Trident was not equipped with a CVR, it will never be known if Key commanded them to be raised, or if he raised them himself. They were around 63kts below minimum clean speed, but because of Key's violent and dictorial personality, neither the F/O, the pilot monitoring, or the deadheading captain in the flightdeck dare question him.


Yes, that part I remember. Key was a textbook example of why CRM was needed!
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