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TTraider95
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U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 8:57 pm

What drove U.S. Air to rebrand themselves to U.S. Airways in the mid 1990s? I know it’s simple question but Google is being no help. I highly doubt the CEO or President just woke up one day and decided it’s high time to rebrand an airline. How long did it the rebranding take?

Thanks,
 
mga707
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 9:05 pm

No periods in either, and the former was usually seen in print as one word: USAir. As far as why, it was Steve Wolf's idea after he took over control from longtime CEO Ed Colodny.
 
Lootess
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 9:17 pm

Yep started in the Wolf era. Original US Airways rebrand and dark paint scheme along with the Airbuses arriving on property.
 
airbazar
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 9:23 pm

What drove it? A really bad series of accidents in the first half of the 90's.
 
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mats
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 9:23 pm

I think there were a few factors.

There were several fatal accidents. under the USAir brand: US5050 (1989), US1491 (1991), US405 (1992), US427 (1994), US1016 (1994).
USAir was suffering from a poor public image as well as an unfortunate series of fatal accidents.

The airline was complicated due to a series of mergers: Allegheny, Piedmont, PSA, Empire, Mohawk, The T***p Shuttle. The route network was very much short-haul with high labour costs. There were some interesting hubs that seemed to overlap: a hub in Dayton and in Indianapolis with a "focus city in Cleveland;" Syracuse and LaGuardia, smaller foci in New Orleans and Kansas City for USAir Express. It was all over the place, and not necessarily lucrative.

The fleet was older, and thus had higher fuel and maintenance costs. Drawing from mergers and its own fleet, USAir had overlapping F28's, F100s, DC-9s, BAC 1-11s... it was a complicated and inefficient network.

Meanwhile, the competition had simplified: they had removed hubs, simplified and modernized their fleets, and focused on high-revenue, longhaul business class traffic, especially in the North Atlantic.

USAir tried to establish a stronger North Atlantic presence through an alliance with British Airways. This included a bizarre "wet lease," in which USAir 767s were painted to look like BA aircraft. They even had a designated flight on Dash-8 from Washington/National to JFK to connect with a Concorde departure. All of this was short-lived.

USAir also tried establishing itself in other niches. They emphasized Florida (the short-lived Florida Shuttle) and California (the California Shuttle), and a stronger presence to the Caribbean. They partnered with LatinPass, but this, also, was brief.

USAir brought in Stephen Wolf from United. Wolf was--err--"uptown." He was a francophile, and he wanted a more European flair. His plan involved rebranding as US "Airways" to a livery that looked A LOT like United. The once patriotic blue and red cabins gave way to two-tone grey.

The attention would be on business travellers (the magazine was renamed "Attaché" and the forward cabin became Envoy Class.) US Airways rapidly added transatlantic routes. The airline got rid of its older aircraft, moving toward a predominantly Airbus fleet. The many hubs were simplified to just a few.

In its next iteration, the America West takeover led to a white livery, blue leather seats, and (I think) sharper uniforms. The Pittsburgh hub dismantled and Phoenix became a stronghold. More longhaul overwater routes developed, including services to Hawaii, Brazil, and Israel. The service was suffered. At one point, passengers had to pay for water. The A320s and 321s on transcon flights were painfully uncomfortable--even in first class, the food was sad, the crews dismissive, and there was no entertainment.
Last edited by mats on Sat Feb 29, 2020 9:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
TTailedTiger
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 9:31 pm

mats wrote:
I think there were a few factors.

There were several fatal accidents. under the USAir brand: US5050 (1989), US1491 (1991), US405 (1992), US427 (1994), US1016 (1994).
USAir was suffering from a poor public image as well as an unfortunate series of fatal accidents.

The airline was complicated due to a series of mergers: Allegheny, Piedmont, Empire, Mohawk, The T***p Shuttle. The route network was very much short-haul with high labour costs. There were some interesting hubs that seemed to overlap: a hub in Dayton and in Indianapolis with a "focus city in Cleveland;" Syracuse and LaGuardia, smaller foci in New Orleans and Kansas City for USAir Express. It was all over the place, and not necessarily lucrative.

The fleet was older, and thus had higher fuel and maintenance costs. Drawing from mergers and its own fleet, USAir had overlapping F28's, F100s, DC-9s, BAC 1-11s... it was a complicated and inefficient network.

Meanwhile, the competition had simplified: they had removed hubs, simplified and modernized their fleets, and focused on high-revenue, longhaul business class traffic, especially in the North Atlantic.

USAir brought in Stephen Wolf from United. Wolf was--err--"uptown." He was a francophile, and he wanted a more European flair. His plan involved rebranding as US "Airways" to a livery that looked A LOT like United. The once patriotic blue and red cabins gave way to two-tone grey.

The attention would be on business travellers (the magazine was renamed "Attaché" and the forward cabin became Envoy Class.) US Airways rapidly added transatlantic routes. The airline got rid of its older aircraft, moving toward a predominantly Airbus fleet. The many hubs were simplified to just a few.

In its next iteration, the America West takeover led to a white livery, blue leather seats, and (I think) sharper uniforms. The Pittsburgh hub dismantled and Phoenix became a stronghold. More longhaul overwater routes developed, including services to Hawaii, Brazil, and Israel. The service was suffered. At one point, passengers had to pay for water. The A320s and 321s on transcon flights were painfully uncomfortable--even in first class, the food was sad, the crews dismissive, and there was no entertainment.


US Air should have been let go. It would have stabilized the industry much sooner had it been allowed to go into Ch 7.
 
cedarjet
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 9:32 pm

Name change was mostly after a run of crashes, but customer experience shortcomings across the board had also harmed the brand.

Btw it was America West that took over USAirways, they went with the USAirways brand because it was more appropriate to a national and transatlantic network carrier. Note the call sign post merger was Cactus (including, famously, Cactus 1549).
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MIflyer12
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 9:50 pm

TTailedTiger wrote:
US Air should have been let go. It would have stabilized the industry much sooner had it been allowed to go into Ch 7.


You could say the same thing for America West (another 9/11 govt loan guarantee recipient) and United (a 3-time loser in the same program).

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/5316334/ns/bu ... lrcQKhKiUk
 
D L X
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 10:29 pm

The name change had little to do with the crashes, and everything to do with Stephen Wolf cozying up with British AIRWAYS, and (mostly) dumping Boeing for a planned all-Airbus fleet. They announced the change simultaneously with the airbus order, with a full page USA Today ad.

The plan was to turn US into a business-oriented airline with a European network to take Americans to all of the business centers there.

(The merger with HP changed the all-Airbus plan.)
 
blacksoviet
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 10:37 pm

When was the last US Air plane repainted into US Airways livery? Were there any planes still in US Air livery at the time of the HP merger?
 
TTailedTiger
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 10:39 pm

D L X wrote:
The name change had little to do with the crashes, and everything to do with Stephen Wolf cozying up with British AIRWAYS, and (mostly) dumping Boeing for a planned all-Airbus fleet. They announced the change simultaneously with the airbus order, with a full page USA Today ad.

The plan was to turn US into a business-oriented airline with a European network to take Americans to all of the business centers there.

(The merger with HP changed the all-Airbus plan.)


Why did the HP merger change that plan? They were all Airbus except for a few very old 757.
 
USPIT10L
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 10:41 pm

blacksoviet wrote:
When was the last US Air plane repainted into US Airways livery? Were there any planes still in US Air livery at the time of the HP merger?


No, there were not. Any aircraft types that were not part of the future of US Airways (except the F100s) were left in the USAir bare-metal scheme.
It's a Great Day for Hockey!
 
flybry
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 10:52 pm

All of the fatal crashes
 
blacksoviet
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 11:00 pm

USPIT10L wrote:
blacksoviet wrote:
When was the last US Air plane repainted into US Airways livery? Were there any planes still in US Air livery at the time of the HP merger?


No, there were not. Any aircraft types that were not part of the future of US Airways (except the F100s) were left in the USAir bare-metal scheme.

Why did they bother painting the F100s?
 
cledaybuck
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 11:01 pm

My experience was the branding never really took. People were still calling the US Air until they disappeared.
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Dominion301
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 11:02 pm

USPIT10L wrote:
blacksoviet wrote:
When was the last US Air plane repainted into US Airways livery? Were there any planes still in US Air livery at the time of the HP merger?


No, there were not. Any aircraft types that were not part of the future of US Airways (except the F100s) were left in the USAir bare-metal scheme.


Weren’t there still a couple of Dash 8s still flying around in USAir Express?
 
PA815
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 11:13 pm

I always thought it was because USAir sounded more regional while US Airways sounded more global, and they wanted the change to fit their route expansion.
 
Ziyulu
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 11:34 pm

I always thought US Airways was the full name of USAir.
 
D L X
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 11:37 pm

TTailedTiger wrote:
D L X wrote:
The name change had little to do with the crashes, and everything to do with Stephen Wolf cozying up with British AIRWAYS, and (mostly) dumping Boeing for a planned all-Airbus fleet. They announced the change simultaneously with the airbus order, with a full page USA Today ad.

The plan was to turn US into a business-oriented airline with a European network to take Americans to all of the business centers there.

(The merger with HP changed the all-Airbus plan.)


Why did the HP merger change that plan? They were all Airbus except for a few very old 757.

HP had a LOT of 737s still, and a lot of 757s, and Doug Parker didn’t share the all-Airbus Philosophy.

Also, 9/11 slowed the retirement of 767s, causing US not to pick up all its A330 options. (Which I think we’re eventually converted to A350 options, then ultimately A321s.)

(Imagine a 737-Max style grounding on an airline with only one type.)
 
PhilMcCrackin
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 11:43 pm

D L X wrote:
HP had a LOT of 737s still, and a lot of 757s, and Doug Parker didn’t share the all-Airbus Philosophy.

Also, 9/11 slowed the retirement of 767s, causing US not to pick up all its A330 options. (Which I think we’re eventually converted to A350 options, then ultimately A321s.)

(Imagine a 737-Max style grounding on an airline with only one type.)


I was going to say, I know I flew on an ancient former HP 737 classic back in 2010 or 2011 flying for LUS. That interior......oof.
 
USAirALB
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 11:45 pm

D L X wrote:
TTailedTiger wrote:
D L X wrote:
The name change had little to do with the crashes, and everything to do with Stephen Wolf cozying up with British AIRWAYS, and (mostly) dumping Boeing for a planned all-Airbus fleet. They announced the change simultaneously with the airbus order, with a full page USA Today ad.

The plan was to turn US into a business-oriented airline with a European network to take Americans to all of the business centers there.

(The merger with HP changed the all-Airbus plan.)


Why did the HP merger change that plan? They were all Airbus except for a few very old 757.

HP had a LOT of 737s still, and a lot of 757s, and Doug Parker didn’t share the all-Airbus Philosophy.

Also, 9/11 slowed the retirement of 767s, causing US not to pick up all its A330 options. (Which I think we’re eventually converted to A350 options, then ultimately A321s.)

(Imagine a 737-Max style grounding on an airline with only one type.)

Respectfully, I disagree. Prior to the AA merger, US was well on its way to being an all Airbus carrier. The 762s/734s were on their way out, and leaving only the 752s as the only Boeing aircraft. IIRC they would have lasted for quite a while, as I seem to recall hearing that plans were being made internally to refurbish them completely.

I am not so sure about the A330 options. US placed an order for A332s after the merger (and also had options for A340s, not sure what type) almost around the same time as the A350. Originally they were to be the launch carrier for the original A350 (which was basically an A330 Lite) and then were to be the North American launch carrier for the redesigned (today's) A350.
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blacksoviet
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sat Feb 29, 2020 11:54 pm

USAirALB wrote:
D L X wrote:
TTailedTiger wrote:

Why did the HP merger change that plan? They were all Airbus except for a few very old 757.

HP had a LOT of 737s still, and a lot of 757s, and Doug Parker didn’t share the all-Airbus Philosophy.

Also, 9/11 slowed the retirement of 767s, causing US not to pick up all its A330 options. (Which I think we’re eventually converted to A350 options, then ultimately A321s.)

(Imagine a 737-Max style grounding on an airline with only one type.)

Respectfully, I disagree. Prior to the AA merger, US was well on its way to being an all Airbus carrier. The 762s/734s were on their way out, and leaving only the 752s as the only Boeing aircraft. IIRC they would have lasted for quite a while, as I seem to recall hearing that plans were being made internally to refurbish them completely.

I am not so sure about the A330 options. US placed an order for A332s after the merger (and also had options for A340s, not sure what type) almost around the same time as the A350. Originally they were to be the launch carrier for the original A350 (which was basically an A330 Lite) and then were to be the North American launch carrier for the redesigned (today's) A350.

What was Doug Parker's plan to replace the last 734s? Did he prefer the A320 over the A321?
 
USPIT10L
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 12:02 am

Dominion301 wrote:
USPIT10L wrote:
blacksoviet wrote:
When was the last US Air plane repainted into US Airways livery? Were there any planes still in US Air livery at the time of the HP merger?


No, there were not. Any aircraft types that were not part of the future of US Airways (except the F100s) were left in the USAir bare-metal scheme.


Weren’t there still a couple of Dash 8s still flying around in USAir Express?


I was referring specifically to the mainline fleet.
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F27500
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 12:06 am

Speaking of Stephen Wolf and Rakesh Gangwal ... where are they now ?
 
UA444
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 12:11 am

MIflyer12 wrote:
TTailedTiger wrote:
US Air should have been let go. It would have stabilized the industry much sooner had it been allowed to go into Ch 7.


You could say the same thing for America West (another 9/11 govt loan guarantee recipient) and United (a 3-time loser in the same program).

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/5316334/ns/bu ... lrcQKhKiUk

Or Continental, who needed two bankruptcies and a strong economy they had no hand in creating to survive

And US Airways was Stephen Wolf’s doing. He wanted a more business like airline and the name change was supposed to reflect that. He also was madly in love with the color grey.
 
TTailedTiger
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 12:19 am

UA444 wrote:
MIflyer12 wrote:
TTailedTiger wrote:
US Air should have been let go. It would have stabilized the industry much sooner had it been allowed to go into Ch 7.


You could say the same thing for America West (another 9/11 govt loan guarantee recipient) and United (a 3-time loser in the same program).

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/5316334/ns/bu ... lrcQKhKiUk

Or Continental, who needed two bankruptcies and a strong economy they had no hand in creating to survive

And US Airways was Stephen Wolf’s doing. He wanted a more business like airline and the name change was supposed to reflect that. He also was madly in love with the color grey.


What made him think business travelers would want to fly on his disgusting planes and subpar service? I remember seeing photos posted of filthy furniture in their clubs, mold growing in air vents on the planes, and F seats with tape on them. US Airways was not known for exceptional service. Far from it.
 
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TheFlyingDisk
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 12:42 am

F27500 wrote:
Speaking of Stephen Wolf and Rakesh Gangwal ... where are they now ?


Rakesh Gangwal's back in India and founded IndiGo, though it seems he's exiting the airline.

https://www.businesstoday.in/current/ec ... 93342.html

Stephen Wolf's chairman of RR Donnelley, a printing company.
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argentinevol98
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 1:02 am

cledaybuck wrote:
My experience was the branding never really took. People were still calling the US Air until they disappeared.


That was my experience was well. Moved to Philly just a year or two before the merger with AA and just about everyone still called it USAir. Additionally people spoke with frequency (if the airline came up) about the accident record and the poor services standards (although the latter was still quite true) which was the image the management seemed to be trying to move away from with the name change. The rebranding seemed to have little effect at least in the PHL market.
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blacksoviet
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 1:02 am

TTailedTiger wrote:
UA444 wrote:
MIflyer12 wrote:

You could say the same thing for America West (another 9/11 govt loan guarantee recipient) and United (a 3-time loser in the same program).

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/5316334/ns/bu ... lrcQKhKiUk

Or Continental, who needed two bankruptcies and a strong economy they had no hand in creating to survive

And US Airways was Stephen Wolf’s doing. He wanted a more business like airline and the name change was supposed to reflect that. He also was madly in love with the color grey.


What made him think business travelers would want to fly on his disgusting planes and subpar service? I remember seeing photos posted of filthy furniture in their clubs, mold growing in air vents on the planes, and F seats with tape on them. US Airways was not known for exceptional service. Far from it.

He was trying to attract business travelers in Pittsburgh and Philadelphia who normally road Amtrak First Class.
 
blacksoviet
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 1:05 am

USPIT10L wrote:
Dominion301 wrote:
USPIT10L wrote:

No, there were not. Any aircraft types that were not part of the future of US Airways (except the F100s) were left in the USAir bare-metal scheme.


Weren’t there still a couple of Dash 8s still flying around in USAir Express?


I was referring specifically to the mainline fleet.

Are you saying that there might have been some polished aluminum Dash 8s flying around in 2008?
 
26point2
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 1:20 am

When the name change occurred I remember an A.net poster saying “it’s like British Airways...only not really”. I remember that comment.
 
USPIT10L
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 1:21 am

No, I as referring to the mainline painting strategy they used. Because of 9/11, most anything about the "last painted plane" went up in smoke. The DC9 retirement was three weeks prior to that date.....the MD-80s were gone by April 2002. Not long after that, the F100s were retired, too. The express painting schedule was never divulged to the public, IINM, there were still US Express aircraft with USAir titles until at least 2004.
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blacksoviet
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 1:34 am

Do the HP flight attendants still belong to a separate union?
 
blacksoviet
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 1:36 am

USPIT10L wrote:
No, I as referring to the mainline painting strategy they used. Because of 9/11, most anything about the "last painted plane" went up in smoke. The DC9 retirement was three weeks prior to that date.....the MD-80s were gone by April 2002. Not long after that, the F100s were retired, too. The express painting schedule was never divulged to the public, IINM, there were still US Express aircraft with USAir titles until at least 2004.

What replaced the F100s?
 
Ziyulu
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 1:48 am

Did US Airways ever start that route to China? What ended up happening to it?
 
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antoniemey
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 1:51 am

26point2 wrote:
When the name change occurred I remember an A.net poster saying “it’s like British Airways...only not really”. I remember that comment.


Airliners.net launched 3 months after the name change was announced, so, it couldn't have been right when it occurred, but maybe as new signage started to become common.
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chepos
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 2:08 am

blacksoviet wrote:
Do the HP flight attendants still belong to a separate union?


ALL AA flight attendants are APFA members. LUS F/A’s used to be AFA union members.


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AA747123
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 2:12 am

TTailedTiger wrote:
mats wrote:

The A320s and 321s on transcon flights were painfully uncomfortable--even in first class, the food was sad, the crews dismissive, and there was no entertainment.


US Air should have been let go. It would have stabilized the industry much sooner had it been allowed to go into Ch 7.


Now HP/US is destroying AA. The Oasis airplanes are a disaster, and the last 3 airplanes I have been on the WiFi didn't work including the streaming movies. The Oasis is the most uncomfortable airplanes in the industry, and Parker has buried the airline in debt.
 
codc10
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 2:28 am

UA444 wrote:
Or Continental, who needed two bankruptcies and a strong economy they had no hand in creating to survive


An airline creating an economy? Really?

Sounds more like an argument about presidential candidates! :lol:
 
USPIT10L
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 2:31 am

blacksoviet wrote:
USPIT10L wrote:
No, I as referring to the mainline painting strategy they used. Because of 9/11, most anything about the "last painted plane" went up in smoke. The DC9 retirement was three weeks prior to that date.....the MD-80s were gone by April 2002. Not long after that, the F100s were retired, too. The express painting schedule was never divulged to the public, IINM, there were still US Express aircraft with USAir titles until at least 2004.

What replaced the F100s?


Nothing....US cut mainline cities left and right. Places that were taking DC9s and F100s were downgauged to Saabs and ERJs/CRJs, when available. Get a US system timetable from 1998 and an OAG from 2003 to see what happened. US (along with just about every other US airline) stopped publishing timetables post 9/11. The drawdown of DC9s and F100s were the beginning of the end for PIT as a hub, although none of us here really knew it at the time. Once DL, NW, and AA introduced RJs into the upper midwest/northeast, they chipped away at US' traffic, bit by bit. By the time they got 175s and more ERJs, their customer base was devastated. IINM, before Siegel took the airline through its first round of BK, they had an RJ scope limit of 70.....everybody else had at least triple or quadruple that number available to them.
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Dominion301
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 2:43 am

blacksoviet wrote:
USPIT10L wrote:
Dominion301 wrote:

Weren’t there still a couple of Dash 8s still flying around in USAir Express?


I was referring specifically to the mainline fleet.

Are you saying that there might have been some polished aluminum Dash 8s flying around in 2008?


The Express fleet in the 90s USAir livery was never in polished silver. Always was in white.

This BEH appears to be the last ever aircraft in service with USAir titles from mid-December 2007:



Maybe it made it to early 2008. Who knows.
 
USPIT10L
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 2:46 am

Thanks for that...by 2007/08, the US operation at PIT was down to 70 departures a day, a far cry from the 500+ we were seeing as a legacy fortress hub.
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jfklganyc
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 3:18 am

D L X wrote:
The name change had little to do with the crashes, and everything to do with Stephen Wolf cozying up with British AIRWAYS, and (mostly) dumping Boeing for a planned all-Airbus fleet. They announced the change simultaneously with the airbus order, with a full page USA Today ad.

The plan was to turn US into a business-oriented airline with a European network to take Americans to all of the business centers there.

(The merger with HP changed the all-Airbus plan.)



This is correct

The name change coincided with the BA relationship
 
MIAFLLPBIFlyer
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 3:25 am

Florida Shuttle even had its own frequent flier program, the "US Air Florida Shuttle Club" which like Southwest at the time gave awards based on segments flown.
 
blacksoviet
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 3:45 am

jfklganyc wrote:
D L X wrote:
The name change had little to do with the crashes, and everything to do with Stephen Wolf cozying up with British AIRWAYS, and (mostly) dumping Boeing for a planned all-Airbus fleet. They announced the change simultaneously with the airbus order, with a full page USA Today ad.

The plan was to turn US into a business-oriented airline with a European network to take Americans to all of the business centers there.

(The merger with HP changed the all-Airbus plan.)



This is correct

The name change coincided with the BA relationship

Why did Donald Carty allow BA to have a relationship with US Air?
 
Cubsrule
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 3:52 am

USPIT10L wrote:
blacksoviet wrote:
USPIT10L wrote:
No, I as referring to the mainline painting strategy they used. Because of 9/11, most anything about the "last painted plane" went up in smoke. The DC9 retirement was three weeks prior to that date.....the MD-80s were gone by April 2002. Not long after that, the F100s were retired, too. The express painting schedule was never divulged to the public, IINM, there were still US Express aircraft with USAir titles until at least 2004.

What replaced the F100s?


Nothing....US cut mainline cities left and right. Places that were taking DC9s and F100s were downgauged to Saabs and ERJs/CRJs, when available. Get a US system timetable from 1998 and an OAG from 2003 to see what happened. US (along with just about every other US airline) stopped publishing timetables post 9/11. The drawdown of DC9s and F100s were the beginning of the end for PIT as a hub, although none of us here really knew it at the time. Once DL, NW, and AA introduced RJs into the upper midwest/northeast, they chipped away at US' traffic, bit by bit. By the time they got 175s and more ERJs, their customer base was devastated. IINM, before Siegel took the airline through its first round of BK, they had an RJ scope limit of 70.....everybody else had at least triple or quadruple that number available to them.


That’s literally true but not entirely fair. US used MDA to work around the scope clause (to PIT’s benefit in the beginning) and, consequently, had a REALLY nice RJ fleet in 2004-2005.
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chepos
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 4:02 am

blacksoviet wrote:
jfklganyc wrote:
D L X wrote:
The name change had little to do with the crashes, and everything to do with Stephen Wolf cozying up with British AIRWAYS, and (mostly) dumping Boeing for a planned all-Airbus fleet. They announced the change simultaneously with the airbus order, with a full page USA Today ad.

The plan was to turn US into a business-oriented airline with a European network to take Americans to all of the business centers there.

(The merger with HP changed the all-Airbus plan.)



This is correct

The name change coincided with the BA relationship

Why did Donald Carty allow BA to have a relationship with US Air?


British Airways invested in US in 93, they had a transatlantic alliance between the two (before AA). In 96 BA hooked up with AA and went ahead with selling their stake in USAir (resulting in a court battle).


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chepos
Posts: 7274
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Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 4:04 am

jfklganyc wrote:
D L X wrote:
The name change had little to do with the crashes, and everything to do with Stephen Wolf cozying up with British AIRWAYS, and (mostly) dumping Boeing for a planned all-Airbus fleet. They announced the change simultaneously with the airbus order, with a full page USA Today ad.

The plan was to turn US into a business-oriented airline with a European network to take Americans to all of the business centers there.

(The merger with HP changed the all-Airbus plan.)



This is correct

The name change coincided with the BA relationship


BA invested in US in 1993, USAirways came to be in 1997. By 1997 the US/BA partnership had soured.


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Fly the Flag!!!!
 
USPIT10L
Posts: 2047
Joined: Tue Mar 28, 2006 12:24 am

Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 4:11 am

blacksoviet wrote:
jfklganyc wrote:
D L X wrote:
The name change had little to do with the crashes, and everything to do with Stephen Wolf cozying up with British AIRWAYS, and (mostly) dumping Boeing for a planned all-Airbus fleet. They announced the change simultaneously with the airbus order, with a full page USA Today ad.

The plan was to turn US into a business-oriented airline with a European network to take Americans to all of the business centers there.

(The merger with HP changed the all-Airbus plan.)



This is correct

The name change coincided with the BA relationship

Why did Donald Carty allow BA to have a relationship with US Air?


While Don Carty was at AA during that time, he was not running it. Bob Crandall was. As others have already stated, the US/BA alliance was terminated in early 1997.
It's a Great Day for Hockey!
 
blacksoviet
Posts: 1646
Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2016 10:50 am

Re: U.S. Air Rebranding to U.S. Airways

Sun Mar 01, 2020 4:32 am

chepos wrote:
jfklganyc wrote:
D L X wrote:
The name change had little to do with the crashes, and everything to do with Stephen Wolf cozying up with British AIRWAYS, and (mostly) dumping Boeing for a planned all-Airbus fleet. They announced the change simultaneously with the airbus order, with a full page USA Today ad.

The plan was to turn US into a business-oriented airline with a European network to take Americans to all of the business centers there.

(The merger with HP changed the all-Airbus plan.)



This is correct

The name change coincided with the BA relationship


BA invested in US in 1993, USAirways came to be in 1997. By 1997 the US/BA partnership had soured.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Did Piedmont or US have a codeshare with BA before the investment? Was BA allowed to use US gates at PHL?

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