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mig17
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sat Mar 21, 2020 1:39 pm

727 AT, 737 UX/SK/TO/SS, 747 UT/AF/SQ/BA/SS, 767 UA, 777 AF, A300 IW/TG, A310 EK, A318/19/20/21 AF/U2/VY, A332/3 EK/QR/TX, A343 AF, A388 AF, E145/170/190 A5/WF, Q400 WF, ATR 72 A5/TX, CRJ100/700/1000 A5, C-150/172, PC-6.
 
smartplane
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sat Mar 21, 2020 3:18 pm

Sokes wrote:
Strato2 wrote:
Chemist wrote:
I'm wondering if this virus crisis is another big acceleration of the death of the A380?
Glad I got my first flight on one a few weeks ago.


The virus is the death of the 777X. Nobody will want such a large plane with the risks of another pandemic. Luckily almost all Superjumbos have been delivered.


How many years until B777-9 will be delivered in significant numbers?
In an epidemic airlines will have to idle maybe 50%, maybe 80% of capacity. What does it matter if they idle two small or one big plane? And changing a daily service to three times per week in such a situation is acceptable.
If A380s get retired it means that there are not enough city pairs that justify that capacity for an airline. That doesn't mean that most will get retired soon.
B767 doesn't have a modern competitor with similar capacity. A380 also won't have a competitor.
At any rate I don't see A380 retirements caused by Corona, unless the plane was meant to be returned to the lessor within the next four months anyway.

May be seemingly unexplained low use of specific leased aircraft post-CV, depending on how long the downturn lasts, and life cycle of each lease versus actual aircraft hours and cycles.

Groundings will result in some leased aircraft hours / cycles falling into the 'low' range, which triggers a re-pricing if maintained to the end of lease, usually expressed as a discount on the end of lease payment to avoid tax complications. Anything that reduces A380 lessor income won't be welcomed.

Only 12 months ago, EK were 'resting' some aircraft to keep them out of the 'high' range!
 
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FLALEFTY
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sat Mar 21, 2020 3:56 pm

Revelation wrote:
lightsaber wrote:
The article also notes KE and QF A380s being parked.

There are several reports that LH's A380s are parked ( https://www.google.com/search?q=lufthansa+grounds+a380 ) and Emirates having 20+ A380s parked ( https://www.google.com/search?q=emirates+grounds+a380 ) with EK asking AIrbus to defer deliveries. QF is down to operating 2 and it seems AF is down to a similar number.


Here's the latest status of the Lufthansa Group fleet:

https://www.planespotters.net/airline/Lufthansa-Group

Here's Emirates' current fleet situation:

https://www.planespotters.net/airline/Emirates

Here's Air France/KLM:

https://www.planespotters.net/airline/Air-France-KLM

Here's British Airways:

https://www.planespotters.net/airline/British-Airways

And Virgin Atlantic:

https://www.planespotters.net/airline/Virgin-Atlantic
 
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hilram
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sat Mar 21, 2020 3:57 pm

For SK (SAS) three A343 just left the fleet, and the remaining four are parked. I wonder if they will ever fly commercially again.
Flown on: A319, 320, 321, 332, 333, 343 | B732, 734, 735, 736, 73G, 738, 743, 744, 772, 77W | CRJ9 | BAe-146 | DHC-6, 7, 8 | F50 | E195 | MD DC-9 41, MD-82, MD-87
 
Sokes
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sat Mar 21, 2020 4:11 pm

smartplane wrote:
Groundings will result in some leased aircraft hours / cycles falling into the 'low' range, which triggers a re-pricing if maintained to the end of lease, usually expressed as a discount on the end of lease payment to avoid tax complications.


Mine was just common sense. Thanks for the analysis.
Why can't the world be a little bit more autistic?
 
xdlx
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sat Mar 21, 2020 4:13 pm

So moving ahead 18m DL will have in WB ranks: 777/A350/333/332/764
and in the Narrowbodies: A321/320/319/220 B739/800/700/B717

Can someone confirm I am not missing something?
 
716131
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sun Mar 22, 2020 3:43 am

SilkAir has only 5 A320 flying left. Wonder how long will they last? Not to mention the A319 that operates SIN-USM-SIN route.
If it's not Boeing, I'm not going!
 
DeltaRules
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:06 am

xdlx wrote:
So moving ahead 18m DL will have in WB ranks: 777/A350/333/332/764
and in the Narrowbodies: A321/320/319/220 B739/800/700/B717

Can someone confirm I am not missing something?


757-200/300.
A310/319/320/321/333, ARJ, BN2, B717/722/73S/733/734/735/73G/738/739/744/757/753/767/763/764/777, CR1/2/7/9, DH6, 328, EM2/ERJ/E70/E75/E90, F28/100, J31, L10/12/15, DC9/D93/D94/D95/M80/M88/M90/D10, SF3, SST
 
danipawa
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sun Mar 22, 2020 3:21 pm

A319 fleet :

Airbus A319 -112 727 HB-IPT Swiss International ferried 20mar20 ZRH-DGX, for part-out & scrap (+ 713 HB-IPU) ex D-AVYC
Airbus A319 -132 1703 SX-EMM Ellinair ferried 20mar20 SKG-DGX, for part-out & scrap ex N530MF
Airbus A319 -112 1866 VP-CYE Flynas ferried 12/17-18mar20 SHJ-ZAG-KEF-EWR-MZJ on return to lessor

skyliners.
 
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lightsaber
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sun Mar 22, 2020 3:48 pm

Sokes wrote:
Strato2 wrote:
Chemist wrote:
I'm wondering if this virus crisis is another big acceleration of the death of the A380?
Glad I got my first flight on one a few weeks ago.


The virus is the death of the 777X. Nobody will want such a large plane with the risks of another pandemic. Luckily almost all Superjumbos have been delivered.


How many years until B777-9 will be delivered in significant numbers?
In an epidemic airlines will have to idle maybe 50%, maybe 80% of capacity. What does it matter if they idle two small or one big plane? And changing a daily service to three times per week in such a situation is acceptable.
If A380s get retired it means that there are not enough city pairs that justify that capacity for an airline. That doesn't mean that most will get retired soon.
B767 doesn't have a modern competitor with similar capacity. A380 also won't have a competitor.
At any rate I don't see A380 retirements caused by Corona, unless the plane was meant to be returned to the lessor within the next four months anyway.

Two small widebodies could fly twice, say LHR-JFK 2* day. Premium passengers pay more.

You cannot fly the A380 profitably LHR-PHL or SAN.

I see LH and AF retiring all A380. QF probably will retire some. EY and QR are unlikely to profitably fill any A380. They might or might not fly A380s depending on rationality.

The A380 is the largest Aircraft without outstanding costs per seats. There is a reason the 777-300ER outsold the A380. The A350 and 787 will be far easier to justify flights.

If an airline stops routes, they lose all seats on those routes. The A380 survives off connecting traffic, that will be sparse for too long.

Lightsaber
Flu+Covid19 is bad. Consider a flu vaccine, if not for yourself, to protect someone you care about.
 
Sokes
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sun Mar 22, 2020 5:01 pm

lightsaber wrote:
I see LH and AF retiring all A380. QF probably will retire some. EY and QR are unlikely to profitably fill any A380. They might or might not fly A380s depending on rationality.
The A380 is the largest Aircraft without outstanding costs per seats.
Lightsaber


I have never been an A380 fan. But then it's a difference if one buys a new plane or if one scraps an existing plane before time. British Airways still flies around with B747-400.
I'm not qualified to judge. It's just hard for me to imagine that A380s get retired in quantity.
That A380s may change owners is a different issue. For transpacific cargo best goes via Anchorage. I expected some second hand A380s may be used for this purpose. I also expected BA to buy some second hand ones. So far I'm wrong.

blue are orders, green are deliveries:
Image
source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airbus_A3 ... deliveries

The main deliveries were between 2011 and 2016. By 2020 it's an outdated design?
Why can't the world be a little bit more autistic?
 
Sokes
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sun Mar 22, 2020 8:08 pm

I meant to say that while for transatlantic traffic cargo capacity is important, transpacific passenger transport is better suited for a plane with passengers only.
Why can't the world be a little bit more autistic?
 
Strato2
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sun Mar 22, 2020 8:29 pm

Sokes wrote:
I have never been an A380 fan. But then it's a difference if one buys a new plane or if one scraps an existing plane before time. British Airways still flies around with B747-400.
I'm not qualified to judge. It's just hard for me to imagine that A380s get retired in quantity.


People are so much drooling over the desired demise of the A380 that common sense flies out of the window. The A380 will not be retired and replaced by the 777X just because. The difference in operating cost is not big enough for that.
 
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lightsaber
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:12 pm

Sokes wrote:
lightsaber wrote:
I see LH and AF retiring all A380. QF probably will retire some. EY and QR are unlikely to profitably fill any A380. They might or might not fly A380s depending on rationality.
The A380 is the largest Aircraft without outstanding costs per seats.
Lightsaber


I have never been an A380 fan. But then it's a difference if one buys a new plane or if one scraps an existing plane before time. British Airways still flies around with B747-400.
I'm not qualified to judge. It's just hard for me to imagine that A380s get retired in quantity.
That A380s may change owners is a different issue. For transpacific cargo best goes via Anchorage. I expected some second hand A380s may be used for this purpose. I also expected BA to buy some second hand ones. So far I'm wrong.

blue are orders, green are deliveries:
Image
source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airbus_A3 ... deliveries

The main deliveries were between 2011 and 2016. By 2020 it's an outdated design?

Where are the secondary opperators of the A380? So far only HiFly. Not one other.

I specifically didn't mention BA, they'll park and use later. You are aware LH and AF were already returning A380?

Right now 777-300ERs are available and that will squelch any A380 resales Including for cargo. Unfortunately for the A380, there is already a 777-300ERSF program that will now have plenty of stock.

I'm not predicting the end of the A380, but this won't be a quick recovery. That means it will take time to rebuild volume.

Wuhan is now partially lifting lock down after 60 days.

For the A380 to fly again, Los Angeles and New York must allow free travel, but they are only starting lick downs and my impression is the LA lockdown isn't strict enough to be discussing recovery.

Lightsaber
Flu+Covid19 is bad. Consider a flu vaccine, if not for yourself, to protect someone you care about.
 
ltbewr
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:16 pm

One issue from the likely massive volume of retirements from the Covid-19 pandemic will be the sharply declining values of parts and of scrap metal. That could mean some WFU aircraft could waiting for a long time before scrapping/parting out waiting for values to go up.
As to the A380, I think early production models will be retired and scrapped due to their particular issues, although many will be retained until tax/depreciation can be written down and perhaps using some to replace smaller aircraft and less frequency.
 
9Patch
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:31 pm

Strato2 wrote:
Chemist wrote:
I'm wondering if this virus crisis is another big acceleration of the death of the A380?
Glad I got my first flight on one a few weeks ago.


The virus is the death of the 777X. Nobody will want such a large plane with the risks of another pandemic. Luckily almost all Superjumbos have been delivered.

Luckily for whom?
Not the airlines that are stuck with them.
 
9Patch
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:49 pm

Strato2 wrote:

People are so much drooling over the desired demise of the A380 that common sense flies out of the window. The A380 will not be retired and replaced by the 777X just because. The difference in operating cost is not big enough for that.

The difference in operating cost is not big if the A380 is full.
It's a lot easier to fill a 777X than a A380.

You appear to be drooling over the desired demise of the 777X.
 
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lightsaber
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sun Mar 22, 2020 10:38 pm

ltbewr wrote:
One issue from the likely massive volume of retirements from the Covid-19 pandemic will be the sharply declining values of parts and of scrap metal. That could mean some WFU aircraft could waiting for a long time before scrapping/parting out waiting for values to go up.
As to the A380, I think early production models will be retired and scrapped due to their particular issues, although many will be retained until tax/depreciation can be written down and perhaps using some to replace smaller aircraft and less frequency.

The opposite will happen, less risk with frequency and customers pay a premium for flying when they want to.

The A380 had too few cities it could profitably serve when this started. JFK, LAX, SYD, PEK, PVG, HKG, SFO, and few others for others than EK.

LH down to 6 of 10. If not filled to LAX and JFK, where?

AF in process of dropping to 5 from 10 anyway.

BA is heavily dependent on JFK, HKG, and LAX to fill A380s. Until those markets and China recovers, BA will continue to park A380s.

EK has the bulk of the fleet. Traffic has to grow enough to once again allow A380 to A380 connections. I think there will be a step down in demand. I do not predict an end to either EK or the A380, but the rate of retirement will be increased.

I could see EK parking a batch and returning them to service. This doesn't bode well for the 779 demand.

I see customers asking for a delay in EIS.

Lightsaber
Flu+Covid19 is bad. Consider a flu vaccine, if not for yourself, to protect someone you care about.
 
Scotron12
Posts: 496
Joined: Fri Mar 01, 2019 2:13 pm

Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Sun Mar 22, 2020 10:55 pm

lightsaber wrote:
ltbewr wrote:
One issue from the likely massive volume of retirements from the Covid-19 pandemic will be the sharply declining values of parts and of scrap metal. That could mean some WFU aircraft could waiting for a long time before scrapping/parting out waiting for values to go up.
As to the A380, I think early production models will be retired and scrapped due to their particular issues, although many will be retained until tax/depreciation can be written down and perhaps using some to replace smaller aircraft and less frequency.

The opposite will happen, less risk with frequency and customers pay a premium for flying when they want to.

The A380 had too few cities it could profitably serve when this started. JFK, LAX, SYD, PEK, PVG, HKG, SFO, and few others for others than EK.

LH down to 6 of 10. If not filled to LAX and JFK, where?

AF in process of dropping to 5 from 10 anyway.

BA is heavily dependent on JFK, HKG, and LAX to fill A380s. Until those markets and China recovers, BA will continue to park A380s.

EK has the bulk of the fleet. Traffic has to grow enough to once again allow A380 to A380 connections. I think there will be a step down in demand. I do not predict an end to either EK or the A380, but the rate of retirement will be increased.

I could see EK parking a batch and returning them to service. This doesn't bode well for the 779 demand.

I see customers asking for a delay in EIS.

Lightsaber


AFAIK....EK is parking the whole A380 fleet. Thats 115 of them.

As you note, where are they going to use the 779?? It certainly doesn't bode well for the 779 if the largest airline by order cannot use them.
 
716131
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Mon Mar 23, 2020 6:02 am

After CX, now SQ is following CX in grounding almost all of it's flight and they describe that this is their "Hardest Hit" it ever faced. Only 10 aircraft on SQ will fly at this moment. Wonder if GA and others will follow too.

https://www.marketscreener.com/CATHAY-P ... -30210446/
If it's not Boeing, I'm not going!
 
groupguy
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Mon Mar 23, 2020 7:25 am

didn't see any mention of it above, but in todays Australian media it says Qantas 744's might have their last flight even next week & that's it.

They were going to be retired later in 2020.
 
Opus99
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Mon Mar 23, 2020 7:44 am

lightsaber wrote:
ltbewr wrote:
One issue from the likely massive volume of retirements from the Covid-19 pandemic will be the sharply declining values of parts and of scrap metal. That could mean some WFU aircraft could waiting for a long time before scrapping/parting out waiting for values to go up.
As to the A380, I think early production models will be retired and scrapped due to their particular issues, although many will be retained until tax/depreciation can be written down and perhaps using some to replace smaller aircraft and less frequency.

The opposite will happen, less risk with frequency and customers pay a premium for flying when they want to.

The A380 had too few cities it could profitably serve when this started. JFK, LAX, SYD, PEK, PVG, HKG, SFO, and few others for others than EK.

LH down to 6 of 10. If not filled to LAX and JFK, where?

AF in process of dropping to 5 from 10 anyway.

BA is heavily dependent on JFK, HKG, and LAX to fill A380s. Until those markets and China recovers, BA will continue to park A380s.

EK has the bulk of the fleet. Traffic has to grow enough to once again allow A380 to A380 connections. I think there will be a step down in demand. I do not predict an end to either EK or the A380, but the rate of retirement will be increased.

I could see EK parking a batch and returning them to service. This doesn't bode well for the 779 demand.

I see customers asking for a delay in EIS.

Lightsaber

But with a retirement of the 380 being sped up doesn’t that leave a market for the much smaller 779? My honest opinion is demand will come back and it will probably coincide with EIS of the 779 which is mid 2021 (maybe not pre-covid levels) but good levels. I think the delay of the 779 given GE9X issues it had last year is perfect for it because that on time delivery weight is lifted and it will be ready when airlines will ACTUALLY need it as when demand comes back and you realise you have too few aircrafts to meet it.
 
RickNRoll
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Mon Mar 23, 2020 7:49 am

The economic repurcussions could last a decade.
 
Scotron12
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Mon Mar 23, 2020 7:56 am

Which airline will afford to take delivery of their 779s by mid 2021?
 
Arion640
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Joined: Fri Mar 31, 2017 5:15 pm

Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Mon Mar 23, 2020 9:36 am

lightsaber wrote:
ltbewr wrote:
One issue from the likely massive volume of retirements from the Covid-19 pandemic will be the sharply declining values of parts and of scrap metal. That could mean some WFU aircraft could waiting for a long time before scrapping/parting out waiting for values to go up.
As to the A380, I think early production models will be retired and scrapped due to their particular issues, although many will be retained until tax/depreciation can be written down and perhaps using some to replace smaller aircraft and less frequency.

The opposite will happen, less risk with frequency and customers pay a premium for flying when they want to.

The A380 had too few cities it could profitably serve when this started. JFK, LAX, SYD, PEK, PVG, HKG, SFO, and few others for others than EK.

LH down to 6 of 10. If not filled to LAX and JFK, where?

AF in process of dropping to 5 from 10 anyway.

BA is heavily dependent on JFK, HKG, and LAX to fill A380s. Until those markets and China recovers, BA will continue to park A380s.

EK has the bulk of the fleet. Traffic has to grow enough to once again allow A380 to A380 connections. I think there will be a step down in demand. I do not predict an end to either EK or the A380, but the rate of retirement will be increased.

I could see EK parking a batch and returning them to service. This doesn't bode well for the 779 demand.

I see customers asking for a delay in EIS.

Lightsaber


BA doesn’t fly the A380 to JFK, do you mean SFO lightsaber?
 
MoonC
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Mon Mar 23, 2020 9:44 am

xdlx wrote:
So moving ahead 18m DL will have in WB ranks: 777/A350/333/332/764
and in the Narrowbodies: A321/320/319/220 B739/800/700/B717

Can someone confirm I am not missing something?


Yeah, the A330neo.
 
AirbusOnly
Posts: 410
Joined: Fri Jun 02, 2006 4:06 am

Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Mon Mar 23, 2020 10:21 am

I also see LH accelerate retiring of their 11 active A 340-600 frames. They only use still two frames daily to CPT from MUC and BOG from FRA. I personally would find it very unfortunate if my favourite aircraft disappeared from the sky, but they are gas guzzlers. We have to be realistic about this.
 
Pcoder
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Mon Mar 23, 2020 11:18 am

AirbusOnly wrote:
I also see LH accelerate retiring of their 11 active A 340-600 frames. They only use still two frames daily to CPT from MUC and BOG from FRA. I personally would find it very unfortunate if my favourite aircraft disappeared from the sky, but they are gas guzzlers. We have to be realistic about this.


One of the things that is different this time compared to in 2008 and the financial crisis is the price of jet fuel is much lower now and could stay depressed for a little while longer. Older aircraft that will still probably be retired, but since capital expenditure will need to be massively reduced, there is probably likely to be more delays and cancellations to existing orders.

I could very much see some LH a346 parked in the desert for a little of time and brought back if when a recovery happens.
 
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PacoMartin
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Tue Mar 24, 2020 12:14 am

Arion640 wrote:
AA and United will also have to park a huge amount lf their long haul fleet as a lot of it goes into LHR. Especially AA.


Frankly with the initial numbers in, I am a little surprised United airlines differs so radically on widebodies from Delta and American

49.7% widebodies Delta parked
40.0% widebodies American parked
16.8% widebodies United parked
...
8.5% narrowbodies American parked
12.8% narrowbodies Delta parked
14.4% narrowbodies United parked

I am wondering if this is foreshadowing and Delta and American will be reducing capacity in the long haul markets and turning them over to foreign carriers and United.

American's financial performance is so marginal in long haul (except for the Southern Cone) that this may be a good excuse to simply end these flights.
 
MIflyer12
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Tue Mar 24, 2020 12:29 am

xdlx wrote:
So moving ahead 18m DL will have in WB ranks: 777/A350/333/332/764
and in the Narrowbodies: A321/320/319/220 B739/800/700/B717

Can someone confirm I am not missing something?


Why do you think 763s are parked, never to return? As someone mentioned recently, when you can't fill a plane, the key metric is trip cost, not CASM. 763s will have value for some years yet unless intercontinental traffic rebounds very strongly.
 
Arion640
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Tue Mar 24, 2020 8:46 am

PacoMartin wrote:
Arion640 wrote:
AA and United will also have to park a huge amount lf their long haul fleet as a lot of it goes into LHR. Especially AA.


Frankly with the initial numbers in, I am a little surprised United airlines differs so radically on widebodies from Delta and American

49.7% widebodies Delta parked
40.0% widebodies American parked
16.8% widebodies United parked
...
8.5% narrowbodies American parked
12.8% narrowbodies Delta parked
14.4% narrowbodies United parked

I am wondering if this is foreshadowing and Delta and American will be reducing capacity in the long haul markets and turning them over to foreign carriers and United.

American's financial performance is so marginal in long haul (except for the Southern Cone) that this may be a good excuse to simply end these flights.


I am too. Although I don’t think it will be long before president trump enforces a lockdown.
 
Flying-Tiger
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Joined: Mon Aug 23, 1999 5:35 am

Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Tue Mar 24, 2020 12:42 pm

SQ789 wrote:
Other suggestion is that SilkAir (Singapore) has only fewer A320s in service and I expect they will retire all of them anytime soon.


I think the whole fleet planning at SQ and others is being reset at the moment, and we will see some major changes which were never intended but are now executed as they make sense in today´s and the near- to mid-term future.

I can imagine that SQ simply dumps the 737Max at Silkair and uses the A320/321neo on order for Scoot to make up for the capacity gap and splits the fleet in two. That in return for some concessions from Airbus = acceptance of A350 deferrals.

Now is the best time for fleet planners [and bean counters] to make radical changes to the fleet without major impact(s) on operations, and getting rid of unwanted equipment with no repercussions.
Flown: A319/320/321,A332/3,A343/346, A359, A380,AT4,AT7,B712, B732/3/4/5/7/8/9,B742/4,B752/3, B762/763,B772/77W,CR2/7/9/K,ER3/4,E70/75/90/95, F50/70/100,M11,L15,SF3,S20, AR8/1, 142/143,... 330.860 miles and counting.
 
716131
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Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Tue Mar 24, 2020 12:47 pm

Flying-Tiger wrote:
SQ789 wrote:
Other suggestion is that SilkAir (Singapore) has only fewer A320s in service and I expect they will retire all of them anytime soon.


I think the whole fleet planning at SQ and others is being reset at the moment, and we will see some major changes which were never intended but are now executed as they make sense in today´s and the near- to mid-term future.

I can imagine that SQ simply dumps the 737Max at Silkair and uses the A320/321neo on order for Scoot to make up for the capacity gap and splits the fleet in two. That in return for some concessions from Airbus = acceptance of A350 deferrals.

Now is the best time for fleet planners [and bean counters] to make radical changes to the fleet without major impact(s) on operations, and getting rid of unwanted equipment with no repercussions.

Don't think SQ will go for the NEO as TR already have much NEO order and even not dumb the MAX. Several airlines has not Dumb the MAX yet as Airbus now struggles to build new NEO's as well. See this.

https://www.seattletimes.com/business/a ... st-enough/
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Flying-Tiger
Posts: 4045
Joined: Mon Aug 23, 1999 5:35 am

Re: Accelerating aircraft retirements

Tue Mar 24, 2020 12:58 pm

Don't think SQ will go for the NEO as TR already have much NEO order and even not dumb the MAX. Several airlines has not Dumb the MAX yet as Airbus now struggles to build new NEO's as well. See this.

https://www.seattletimes.com/business/a ... st-enough/


This was certainly correct until a few weeks ago where there was an actual capacity crunch. That one has gone, now you´re stuck with a massive capacity overhang, and a lasting one. In above example the 737 MAX was the vehicle to ensure enough capacity being available at a given time in future. No longer needed for this purpose.

What was correct a month ago doesn´t mean that it´s still correct.

BTW, SQ is only an example. I could imagine a large number of carrier re-considering their fleet strategy at this point.
Flown: A319/320/321,A332/3,A343/346, A359, A380,AT4,AT7,B712, B732/3/4/5/7/8/9,B742/4,B752/3, B762/763,B772/77W,CR2/7/9/K,ER3/4,E70/75/90/95, F50/70/100,M11,L15,SF3,S20, AR8/1, 142/143,... 330.860 miles and counting.

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