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vhtje
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Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 1:35 pm

I stumbled across this on a group I am a member of on Facebook, thought I would share:

https://my.matterport.com/show/?m=rtPb7TAsPC8&fbclid=IwAR1PrxW15K_ikBC1-JM89rVjii_wFOsHv_QwZV_GK1qgBsgPHRji1XuGjwY

Three things that strike me are:

1) The generous legroom, even in Economy
2) The garish interior (it was the 1970s, the decade taste forgot, I suppose)
3) How small the galley is - no ovens. Presumably they were only used on short sectors?

Do make sure you navigate all the way into the cockpit and to the rear door/jumpseat. Enjoy!
I only turn left when boarding aircraft. Well, mostly. All right, sometimes. OH OKAY - rarely.
 
dcaproducer
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 1:48 pm

Great find. While I don't recall the UA interior, I used to fly Eastern and TWA's 727's and in the 80's they weren't much better inside in terms of design. I'm so glad the cloth seats are pretty much a thing of the past.
 
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smithbs
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 2:26 pm

Nice tour! Thanks for posting.

I agree the interior is garish, but I appreciate that they tried to make a statement. Modern interiors tend to be bland, in my opinion. A statement of color or design would be appreciated.

Also interesting with the interior design, with the mid-galley and then the coat compartments forward of the galley. Today those would just be crammed with more seats.
 
arcticcruiser
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 2:43 pm

Nice, but I don´t think closed overhead bins became a thing on narrowbodies until the eighties... all open hatracks until then. But I stand to be corrected on UA.
 
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Polot
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 3:19 pm

arcticcruiser wrote:
Nice, but I don´t think closed overhead bins became a thing on narrowbodies until the eighties... all open hatracks until then. But I stand to be corrected on UA.

Closed bins were around in narrow bodies since the 70s. Closed bins were part of the “widebody” cabin that Boeing offered (either directly or retrofitted) on the 707/727/737 to relate to the 747. Aftermarket companies quickly followed.

The bins on this 727 are not the widebody cabin bins though, they are aftermarket or a later Boeing offering.
 
kiowa
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 3:29 pm

very nice! thank you vhtje
 
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VirginFlyer
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 3:40 pm

This was the interior this aircraft retired with in 1991.

Polot wrote:
arcticcruiser wrote:
Nice, but I don´t think closed overhead bins became a thing on narrowbodies until the eighties... all open hatracks until then. But I stand to be corrected on UA.

Closed bins were around in narrow bodies since the 70s. Closed bins were part of the “widebody” cabin that Boeing offered (either directly or retrofitted) on the <a href="tel:707/727/737">707/727/737</a> to relate to the 747. Aftermarket companies quickly followed.

The bins on this 727 are not the widebody cabin bins though, they are aftermarket or a later Boeing offering.

Here are some photos showing the original hat racks, the wide body interior, and the modern style overheads on the 727:



smithbs wrote:
Also interesting with the interior design, with the mid-galley and then the coat compartments forward of the galley. Today those would just be crammed with more seats.

The placement of the right-hand service door/emergency exit on the 727-100 was always intriguing, part way down the fuselage instead of opposite the left-hand entry door. I would assume the thinking was having the galley in the mid section allowed easier movement both forward and rearward in the cabin, though I would be keen to hear of there were other design considerations at play here.



Come the 727-200, the right-hand door was moved to be opposite the left-hand:



V/F
It is not for him to pride himself who loveth his own country, but rather for him who loveth the whole world. The earth is but one country, and mankind its citizens. —Bahá'u'lláh
 
PSAatSAN4Ever
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 3:43 pm

What a fascinating look into the past! Thank you for sharing that with us!!

I am lucky enough to say that I flew on two of these UA 727-022's in my life, and I know that because of specific features:

1) December, 1974, BFL-LAX. As an eight-year old boy, I flew with my mom and baby sister to LAX from BFL by climbing up the rear air-stairs. How about that - my first flight EVER, and it turns out to be my one and only time to board from the back of the plane. I have no memory whatsoever of the galley, though - I know we sat behind the wing for the short flight, and I doubt I would have known what it was anyway.

2) May, 1986, SBA-BFL. At the time UA was trying to link BFL with other locations for SFO and DEN service, with two triangle-routed SFO-BFL-SBA-SFO and SFO-SBA-BFL-SFO flights per day. I took advantage to visit a friend in Santa Barbara, with the outbound stage on a 737-222, and the return was listed as "727", with no further information. I assumed it was to be a 727-200, which was much more common, but when the plane showed up, luckily for me it was a 727-100. For this return trip I discovered that my seat 10F, was not only a window seat (which I knew) but was a bulkhead row, directly behind the galley. No airstairs, though - we boarded through door 1 Left and I finally got to see the front of this airplane.

Two coincidental points about this short but memorable trip:

1) I had literally just finished a book about a DC-9 hijacked and forced to land on an old aircraft carrier (really bizarre book), but a major plot point was that the armed hijackers found out at the last minute that their intended target was a DC-9 last-minute substitution, which created chaos for them because they had based their practice runs on a 727-100, with the location of the galley playing an important part in their take-over plans. The DC-9, like most other planes, had their galley at Door 1 Right, whereas the unusual placement of the galley on the 727-100 would have kept the flight attendants away from the cockpit door.

2) I still have a plastic model of a TWA 727-131 from the late 1970's, and I knew when building it that, from the location of the exits on the decals, that the biggest door on the right side of the plane was the galley door, near the wing root. Because I had this model, I knew exactly what the author was talking about in the story.

Thanks again for sharing the site!!
 
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 3:44 pm

That’s awesome. Note the position of the FC lav, too.
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longhauler
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 3:56 pm

That’s a small galley. I see only one oven, perhaps for F meals. Also notice there is another galley module between F and Y on the left side of the aircraft, with room for a cart.

During this time, United was serving Y meals on something called a “Genie Tray”. They were boarded hot and kept warm in a thick almost Thermos tray. It looks like the forward half of the galley was set up for them.

While the colours may seem garish by today’s standards, it was pretty muted compared to the multi-coloured flower seat patterns of the 70s. I remember those F seats when flying on a DC-8-61 of UA on a flight from ORD-RNO.
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EWRandMDW
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 4:02 pm

When the Covid-19 crisis has subsided and it is deemed safe to travel, you can visit the 727-122 at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago.Following is the link to a YouTube video showing the plane's last ever landing (at Meigs Field, later razed by Mayor Richard M. Daley) and transport to and installation in the museum. Enjoy!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KW4PGrWLfgs
 
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DL_Mech
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 4:46 pm

What a time capsule! I was surprised to see the canisters of RainBoe rain repellant on the aft cockpit wall. They were deactivated some time in the mid -90s due to being a carcinogen. Since this plane was in storage, they were never removed.

At one time this plane did have galley ovens. There are six galley oven C/Bs in the cockpit that are deactivated (two three phase breakers).

The 727-100s also have the 707 yokes. The 727-200s have the ones used by 737s and 747s.
This plane is built to withstand anything... except a bad pilot.
 
mmahpeel
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 5:54 pm

All United 727s as well as the DC8 fleet had a palletized galley system. This was designed way back in the DC8 days to allow for quick change outs of the galleys. Instead of removing multiple carriers per galley, the idea was to basically only swap out 4 components per galley - two large palletized units and two carrier boxes.

On the 727-022, the galley unit on the forward side consisted of a large pallet unit (somewhere around 5 to 5 1/2 feet tall) with four compartments that contained all the cold tray set-ups (often double stacked) as well as glassware and other miscellaneous provisions. The entire pallet was removed when changing out the galley. There was an additional carrier box that was placed above it.

On the aft side of the galley was another pallet unit that fit under the counter. This unit contained two warming ovens in which the entrees were loaded already warm. Before serving the meals, a switch was flipped to 'flash-heat' the entrees. When ready the hot entree from the aft unit was placed on the cold tray from the forward unit and hand-run. There were two additional compartments below that contained chilled beverages, ice, wine, dairy etc. Above the counter were two coffee wamers, coffee makers and another removable carrier with supplies, usually coffee/tea etc. There was an additional stowage compartment that was not removable.

These galley components were interchangeable between the DC8 fleet and the 727 fleet, and I know United had some sort of special name for the system but I can't recall what it was....

At some point in the 1970s, a beverage cart was added to the 727-022 and the stowage area is visible between the economy and first class cabins. The 727-222 had a dedicated stowage space for the beverage cart between the aft-galley and the lavatories.

Of note, the DC8 fleet never had dedicated beverage carts - even after the DC8-61s were completely refurbished during the conversion to DC8-71s. Beverages continued to be served via 3-tiered carts (UA called them queen carts) that were manually set-up by the flight attendants.

United only used the 'genie' trays (by Aladdin) on the non-advanced 737-222 fleet in economy as there was no ovens in the aft galley (the small first class galley on the 737 had a rather anemic oven). They were as longhauler described and messy, slimy and generally hated by the crews. They were bulk-stacked in this big compartments in the 737-222 galley. I know other airlines used these as well - I remember eating out of them as a kid on a few Hughes Airwest DC9 flights....
 
KlimaBXsst
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 6:34 pm

One of my favorite planes to this day. American’s galley reconfiguration with modular carts in the 80’s was a vast improvement upon the United galleys.

A pair of modular half beverage carts moved inflight to the 1L location, but not blocking a jumpseat;

could really of helped the FWD F/C attendant avoid some of the galley congestion back in the 60s and 70s in full flights. Fortunately full was somewhat rare.
Aesthetically the A 340 got it right!
 
TW870
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 6:51 pm

mmahpeel wrote:
All United 727s as well as the DC8 fleet had a palletized galley system. This was designed way back in the DC8 days to allow for quick change outs of the galleys. Instead of removing multiple carriers per galley, the idea was to basically only swap out 4 components per galley - two large palletized units and two carrier boxes.

On the 727-022, the galley unit on the forward side consisted of a large pallet unit (somewhere around 5 to 5 1/2 feet tall) with four compartments that contained all the cold tray set-ups (often double stacked) as well as glassware and other miscellaneous provisions. The entire pallet was removed when changing out the galley. There was an additional carrier box that was placed above it.

On the aft side of the galley was another pallet unit that fit under the counter. This unit contained two warming ovens in which the entrees were loaded already warm. Before serving the meals, a switch was flipped to 'flash-heat' the entrees. When ready the hot entree from the aft unit was placed on the cold tray from the forward unit and hand-run. There were two additional compartments below that contained chilled beverages, ice, wine, dairy etc. Above the counter were two coffee wamers, coffee makers and another removable carrier with supplies, usually coffee/tea etc. There was an additional stowage compartment that was not removable.

These galley components were interchangeable between the DC8 fleet and the 727 fleet, and I know United had some sort of special name for the system but I can't recall what it was....

At some point in the 1970s, a beverage cart was added to the 727-022 and the stowage area is visible between the economy and first class cabins. The 727-222 had a dedicated stowage space for the beverage cart between the aft-galley and the lavatories.

Of note, the DC8 fleet never had dedicated beverage carts - even after the DC8-61s were completely refurbished during the conversion to DC8-71s. Beverages continued to be served via 3-tiered carts (UA called them queen carts) that were manually set-up by the flight attendants.

United only used the 'genie' trays (by Aladdin) on the non-advanced 737-222 fleet in economy as there was no ovens in the aft galley (the small first class galley on the 737 had a rather anemic oven). They were as longhauler described and messy, slimy and generally hated by the crews. They were bulk-stacked in this big compartments in the 737-222 galley. I know other airlines used these as well - I remember eating out of them as a kid on a few Hughes Airwest DC9 flights....


Great post! I only worked the -200, as the standard 727s were long gone by the time I started as an FA in 1998. I loved working the 727, but the palletized galley system was absolutely terrible. The first class entrees were always so dried out in the "flash ovens" by the time you served. Mushy broccoli, brown green beans, etc. The carrier doors were a nightmare to get off. Inevitably, I would cut my fingers getting the galley set up, and then have to pause the service to put on bandaids to avoid unsanitary food service. The toughest flights to work these on were ORD-DCA turns, especially the eastbound. 1:25 flight time, no tray carts so you had to run everything, and the purser having to serve the three pilots. If you didn't have the 4th FA, it was almost impossible to do it.

I had never been inside a United -100, but I remember these seats from the DC-8-71s which I flew on as a kid. I recall that on the -71s the middle seats were solid brown - without the colored patterns. I love the white first class seatbacks - and the plexiglass bulkhead to give the forward flight attendants clear sight lines to the cabin.

Also, note that this airplane is a 727-22, not an -022. 727-100s built before the -200s came online were just 727s, so the type was followed by a dash and the customer code. This is different than the 720, which did use the 0 before the customer code. United, thus, had 720-022s and 727-22s.
 
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VirginFlyer
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 7:53 pm

mmahpeel wrote:
All United 727s as well as the DC8 fleet had a palletized galley system. This was designed way back in the DC8 days to allow for quick change outs of the galleys. Instead of removing multiple carriers per galley, the idea was to basically only swap out 4 components per galley - two large palletized units and two carrier boxes.

On the 727-022, the galley unit on the forward side consisted of a large pallet unit (somewhere around 5 to 5 1/2 feet tall) with four compartments that contained all the cold tray set-ups (often double stacked) as well as glassware and other miscellaneous provisions. The entire pallet was removed when changing out the galley. There was an additional carrier box that was placed above it.

On the aft side of the galley was another pallet unit that fit under the counter. This unit contained two warming ovens in which the entrees were loaded already warm. Before serving the meals, a switch was flipped to 'flash-heat' the entrees. When ready the hot entree from the aft unit was placed on the cold tray from the forward unit and hand-run. There were two additional compartments below that contained chilled beverages, ice, wine, dairy etc. Above the counter were two coffee wamers, coffee makers and another removable carrier with supplies, usually coffee/tea etc. There was an additional stowage compartment that was not removable.

These galley components were interchangeable between the DC8 fleet and the 727 fleet, and I know United had some sort of special name for the system but I can't recall what it was....

At some point in the 1970s, a beverage cart was added to the 727-022 and the stowage area is visible between the economy and first class cabins. The 727-222 had a dedicated stowage space for the beverage cart between the aft-galley and the lavatories.

Of note, the DC8 fleet never had dedicated beverage carts - even after the DC8-61s were completely refurbished during the conversion to DC8-71s. Beverages continued to be served via 3-tiered carts (UA called them queen carts) that were manually set-up by the flight attendants.

United only used the 'genie' trays (by Aladdin) on the non-advanced 737-222 fleet in economy as there was no ovens in the aft galley (the small first class galley on the 737 had a rather anemic oven). They were as longhauler described and messy, slimy and generally hated by the crews. They were bulk-stacked in this big compartments in the 737-222 galley. I know other airlines used these as well - I remember eating out of them as a kid on a few Hughes Airwest DC9 flights....

Thanks for the very interesting post! The beverage cart stowage between first and economy is presumably the area on the left-hand side. Do you know what the purpose of the stowage compartment opposite it is, with the curtain and restraining net? Large items of carry-on baggage? Checked baggage? Something else?

V/F
It is not for him to pride himself who loveth his own country, but rather for him who loveth the whole world. The earth is but one country, and mankind its citizens. —Bahá'u'lláh
 
wjcandee
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 8:20 pm

Those bins are much later. I would guess late 1980s. What aircraft is this, and when was the presentation filmed?
 
KlimaBXsst
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 8:23 pm

The mini Executive cabin between the F/C cabin and the mid galley is pretty cozy and private too!

Definite thanks for posting this. Replicating such a fine aircraft design in the future will be a real challenge for both Airbus or Boeing.
Aesthetically the A 340 got it right!
 
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Mike7691
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 8:38 pm

Thank you for posting that.
Took me back to my career as cabin crew in the UK.
I started in the 80’s on the 727 -100/200 and BAC1-11.
I loved the 727, our 200’s were in charter configuration of 187 seats.
I spent 30 years flying and left 3 years ago.
Worked on BAC1-11 200/300/400/500, Boeing 727 100/200, 737 200/300/400/500, 747 200/400, 757 200, 767 300, 777 200/300, 787 8/9, Airbus 319/320/321, Airbus 380.
 
UA444
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 9:05 pm

wjcandee wrote:
Those bins are much later. I would guess late 1980s. What aircraft is this, and when was the presentation filmed?

It’s N7001U, the first 727 built. It was retired by UA in 1991.
 
CRJ900
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Fri May 15, 2020 11:43 pm

What a great thread, this answers so many questions about classic airliners.

Very fascinated by the palletized galley system - I have searched far and wide to find pics or drawings of the huge galleys found on the DC-8-60/70s without luck.

The palletized galley on this B727-22 looks like it is as deep as today's full-size cart - but it was obviously narrow enough to fit through the galley service door. Looks very heavy, tho...

I was an FA on the B737-300, B737-800 and B737 MAX 8 (2009-2019) and only worked with ATLAS galleys where carts play a huge role and makes everything much easier to handle.

Hope many more old-timers will share their experiences on the good-ol' airliners now only found in museums...
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TW870
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Sat May 16, 2020 12:47 am

CRJ900 wrote:
The palletized galley on this B727-22 looks like it is as deep as today's full-size cart - but it was obviously narrow enough to fit through the galley service door. Looks very heavy, tho...

I was an FA on the B737-300, B737-800 and B737 MAX 8 (2009-2019) and only worked with ATLAS galleys where carts play a huge role and makes everything much easier to handle.

Hope many more old-timers will share their experiences on the good-ol' airliners now only found in museums...


It was so heavy! Just ungodly. The galley service crews just hated them, as they always got stuck in place - or conversely wouldn't lock to be secured for takeoff. They were as deep as a cart, and fit through the full size service doors, which on our airplanes were 1R and 2R. The forward side of the forward galley on the -200 was divided into four cabinets. The top two were all your first class supplies, including trays. The bottom two were coach trays for the first ten or so rows (that wouldn't fit in the back galley). Trays fit three deep, although they were wider and less deep than those in tray carts on all the other airplanes. All meal entrees were loaded warm into the flash ovens. The one decent thing was the galley was fairly roomy, so at least you had space to set your trays up and plate your burned, soggy entrees.

The absolute worst was during delays, because there were no chillers and everything just turned to mush. God forbid you were serving pasta up front. It would be absolutely dry by the time you served. There were times where I was so embarrassed to set the tray down in front of the passenger - although they usually expected it on the 727.

Overall, though, it was a fun airplane two work. On United's 727-200Advs, there were two rows aft of the 2L cross aisle. They were right next to the engines. Customer service usually left them empty (unless the flight was full) because passengers hated how loud they were. Those two rows became the crew lounge. I had lots of nights on half full 727 flights out of O'Hare in the crew lounge hanging out with the whole crew, eating leftovers and having a good time.
 
Dominion301
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Sat May 16, 2020 2:10 am

VirginFlyer wrote:
This was the interior this aircraft retired with in 1991.

Polot wrote:
arcticcruiser wrote:
Nice, but I don´t think closed overhead bins became a thing on narrowbodies until the eighties... all open hatracks until then. But I stand to be corrected on UA.

Closed bins were around in narrow bodies since the 70s. Closed bins were part of the “widebody” cabin that Boeing offered (either directly or retrofitted) on the <a href="tel:707/727/737">707/727/737</a> to relate to the 747. Aftermarket companies quickly followed.

The bins on this 727 are not the widebody cabin bins though, they are aftermarket or a later Boeing offering.

Here are some photos showing the original hat racks, the wide body interior, and the modern style overheads on the 727:



smithbs wrote:
Also interesting with the interior design, with the mid-galley and then the coat compartments forward of the galley. Today those would just be crammed with more seats.

The placement of the right-hand service door/emergency exit on the 727-100 was always intriguing, part way down the fuselage instead of opposite the left-hand entry door. I would assume the thinking was having the galley in the mid section allowed easier movement both forward and rearward in the cabin, though I would be keen to hear of there were other design considerations at play here.



Come the 727-200, the right-hand door was moved to be opposite the left-hand:



V/F


The reason for the positioning of the 1R door was to ensure that 727-100 combis would have two full sized emergency exits in a pax-heavy combi configuration. There was an aft galley on a combi. In a 2 pallet/76 pax configuration, the bulkhead was directly in front of 1R. In a 3/54 (going from memory...would have to pull out my old F/A manuals) the bulkhead was in front of the overwing exits.

As I recall about a quarter of 721s built were combis. My former employer First Air operates several 721 combis over a period of almost 20 years. So in a 3 or 4 pallet combi config, 1R was inaccessible. In fact in a 4/34 config only 1 F/A was required on-board and only the aft airstairs were available as an exit.
 
Dominion301
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Sat May 16, 2020 3:24 am

Oops I made a mistake. It was actually 2/77, followed by I think 4/54 and 6/36 as I recall. The still flying 732 combi has 2/76, 3/60 and downward to as low as 24 seats. Under 50 and the 732 combi also only needs 1 F/A
 
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christao17
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Sat May 16, 2020 8:39 am

Thanks for posting this - it made my day. This 1980s color scheme hits squarely in my childhood, growing up as a son of a UA employee and flying a lot on the 727-100s. I always liked the two rows of economy just in front of the galley - it was quite a private "mini cabin" space, or so it seemed at that young age.
More than a dozen years flying in and around Asia...
 
strfyr51
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Sat May 16, 2020 10:44 am

vhtje wrote:
I stumbled across this on a group I am a member of on Facebook, thought I would share:

https://my.matterport.com/show/?m=rtPb7TAsPC8&fbclid=IwAR1PrxW15K_ikBC1-JM89rVjii_wFOsHv_QwZV_GK1qgBsgPHRji1XuGjwY

Three things that strike me are:

1) The generous legroom, even in Economy
2) The garish interior (it was the 1970s, the decade taste forgot, I suppose)
3) How small the galley is - no ovens. Presumably they were only used on short sectors?

Do make sure you navigate all the way into the cockpit and to the rear door/jumpseat. Enjoy!

thatbwas how the 727's looked when I came to work at United in 1984. A few of them had gold paisley sidewalls as well.
 
strfyr51
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Sat May 16, 2020 10:51 am

arcticcruiser wrote:
Nice, but I don´t think closed overhead bins became a thing on narrowbodies until the eighties... all open hatracks until then. But I stand to be corrected on UA.

I can't say for other airlines but the closed bin widebody style interiors are installed when I arrived at United in 1984, I remember having to fix the Bin door latches after some passenger would force one shut after jamming stuff that didn't fit in it.
 
MohawkWeekend
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Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

Sat May 16, 2020 11:03 am

Thanks for sharing - that brings back so many memories. The seat pitch is amazing. Consider that most Americans were on average a bit smaller in stature back then - even 6 abreast looks inviting compared to Coach today.
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    OA260
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sat May 16, 2020 11:05 am

    Great find . Love the B727 was lucky to have flown on it on OA,AA and my last flight was on a IR Domestic flight.
     
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    PPVLC
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sat May 16, 2020 11:58 am

    I flew them a lot! I clearly remember the engine noise from the aft jumpseat -that hypnotic humming that would make anyone fall asleep on long flights. I can just see myself opening the rear door and moving the handle inwards to lower the ventral airstair then waiting for it to be completely extended and locked. Varig had a much bigger galley though, it would take both sides sacrificing 9 seats in the area. I hated the galley jumpseat btw...
    Cabin crew L188 707 727 737 767 A300 DC10 MD11 777 747
     
    ozark1
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sat May 16, 2020 12:08 pm

    Brings back memories. We were an AA crew that started our trip at DFW during the PATCO (air traffic controllers) strike in 1981. We were supposed to go up to OKC and then ORD. When we got to OKC the strike was in full swing and flights were cancelling all over the place, including our flight to ORD. They needed our 727-023 back in DFW and another crew was there to fly it. I saw one of these UA birds at a gate and found out it was going to ORD. Somehow after getting through to scheduling and holding while they figured it all out, we were put on it to DH to ORD. As an AA employee in 81 I thought we hung the moon and I thought the orange and brown interior on the 727-023 we had just left made the UA interior look a little tacky. But it was a nice flight and for the rest of the 3 day trip all we did was get reassigned all over the place. I’m sure much like what went on during the first few weeks of COVID.
     
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    exFWAOONW
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sat May 16, 2020 12:23 pm

    There is a good chance I’ve been on that a/c when it was in service. I can’t count how many hops into Ohare or out to DEN were on the 727. Hello old friend.
    Is just me, or is flying not as much fun anymore?
     
    afcjets
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sat May 16, 2020 1:24 pm

    vhtje wrote:
    Three things that strike me are:

    1) The generous legroom, even in Economy
    2) The garish interior (it was the 1970s, the decade taste forgot, I suppose)
    3) How small the galley is - no ovens. Presumably they were only used on short sectors?


    Ironically the boldest color scheme was the carpet on the bulkhead which was still around in the 2000s on many United aircraft types, including the 744, 757, DC10, and 733.

    United often flew the 727-100 on long domestic routes too, such as BHM-LAX.


    PSAatSAN4Ever wrote:
    May, 1986, SBA-BFL. At the time UA was trying to link BFL with other locations for SFO and DEN service, with two triangle-routed SFO-BFL-SBA-SFO and SFO-SBA-BFL-SFO flights per day. I took advantage to visit a friend in Santa Barbara, with the outbound stage on a 737-222, and the return was listed as "727", with no further information. I assumed it was to be a 727-200, which was much more common, but when the plane showed up, luckily for me it was a 727-100.


    The equipment code for the 727-100 was 727 and was 72S for the 727-200, which was also referred to as 727 Stretch.


    Dominion301 wrote:
    The reason for the positioning of the 1R door was to ensure that 727-100 combis would have two full sized emergency exits in a pax-heavy combi configuration.


    Another reason the galley and 1R door were positioned where they were is because when they were new First Class cabins were larger and that mid- cabin galley was at the end of the F cabin and made it convenient for both F and Y.


    ozark1 wrote:
    As an AA employee in 81 I thought we hung the moon and I thought the orange and brown interior on the 727-023 we had just left made the UA interior look a little tacky. But it was a nice flight and for the rest of the 3 day trip all we did was get reassigned all over the place. I’m sure much like what went on during the first few weeks of COVID.


    That was almost the end of that color scheme for American. The baby blue and beige/taupe interior premiered with the delivery of the 767 in late 1982 and very quickly became standard on the entire AA fleet, including the 727-100.
     
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    pwm2txlhopper
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sat May 16, 2020 1:35 pm

    I like the cabin more than I do the current day cabins with the fake leather seats. That’s what a plane looked like back in my day, and I was flying on UA 727s with this interior well into the 1990s.
     
    USAirALB
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sat May 16, 2020 3:46 pm

    Great find.

    Was there a name of the bulkhead pattern? A similar pattern essentially survived into the early 2000s on the Economy Class seats and bulkheads. The seats on a 777 flight I took in 2009 from IAD to LAX had a similar pattern featured throughout the aircraft.
    longhauler wrote:
    That’s a small galley. I see only one oven, perhaps for F meals. Also notice there is another galley module between F and Y on the left side of the aircraft, with room for a cart.

    During this time, United was serving Y meals on something called a “Genie Tray”. They were boarded hot and kept warm in a thick almost Thermos tray. It looks like the forward half of the galley was set up for them.

    While the colours may seem garish by today’s standards, it was pretty muted compared to the multi-coloured flower seat patterns of the 70s. I remember those F seats when flying on a DC-8-61 of UA on a flight from ORD-RNO.

    I recall being served an Aladdin tray on several shorter USAir 73S flights in the late 1990s as well. I remember them being stackable with this weird seatbelt-like contraption wrapped around several of the covered trays that looked akin to hospital food trays.
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    UA444
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sat May 16, 2020 4:26 pm

    The pattern used until the mid-2000s is different. Those seats were grey and had blue, red, orange “squares” in the center portion. The common nickname is Tequila Sunrise. The bulkheads were also different. There was a lot of blue and grey on the 777s, looked similar to the tail design of the Battleship livery. Along with the rainbow motif. It’s not quite the same as here on N7001U

    I have lots of memories of the grey seats and you can still see them in movies or TV shows. The 737s were the last to have them until retirement in 2009. Rest of the fleet had transitioned to the blue/purpleish fabric, or leather for ex-TED a/c.
     
    USAirALB
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sat May 16, 2020 4:56 pm

    UA444 wrote:
    The pattern used until the mid-2000s is different. Those seats were grey and had blue, red, orange “squares” in the center portion. The common nickname is Tequila Sunrise. The bulkheads were also different. There was a lot of blue and grey on the 777s, looked similar to the tail design of the Battleship livery. Along with the rainbow motif. It’s not quite the same as here on N7001U

    I have lots of memories of the grey seats and you can still see them in movies or TV shows. The 737s were the last to have them until retirement in 2009. Rest of the fleet had transitioned to the blue/purpleish fabric, or leather for ex-TED a/c.

    Ah okay, thanks.

    I was quite surprised to see the pattern on that flight, considering all my other UA flights during that time already had switched to the blue fabric. With the "tequila-sunrise" pattern you mentioned, combined with these purple-blue headrest covers, and royal blue pillows/blankets, the 777 I was on had quite the kaleidoscopic cabin atmosphere.
    RJ85, F70, E135, E140, E145, E70, E75, E90, CR2, CR7, CR9, 717, 732, 733, 734, 735, 73G, 738, 739, 744ER, 752, 753, 762, 772, 77E, 77W, 789, 319, 320, 321, 332, 333, 343, 359, 388
     
    EMB170
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sat May 16, 2020 5:52 pm

    I remember 3 rides on UA's 727-200s back in the late 90s as part of flying IND-ORD-BDL and return. On two of them (IND-ORD and back) the cabin interior looked almost exactly like what was in the original post...I was not impressed. Made me think I was flying on an ancient plane. The 727-200 on ORD-BDL, however, had an interior like VirginFlyer's 3rd photo...and looked like the 727 version of the 737/757 interior I was used to. Does anyone know why UA had 727-200s with such different interiors? If it helps, the one on ORD-BDL I remember was N7278U...
    IND ORD ATL MCO PIT EWR BUF CVG DEN RNO JFK DTW BOS BDL BWI IAD RDU CLT MYR CHS TPA CID MSP STL MSY DFW IAH AUS SLC LAS
     
    Eirules
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sat May 16, 2020 6:15 pm

    Very cool, thanks for sharing

    Was lucky enough to fly on a 727 nearly 20 years ago. That rear stairs was such a novelty at the time
    The way you cut your meat reflects the way you live....
     
    TW870
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sat May 16, 2020 6:17 pm

    Dominion301 wrote:
    VirginFlyer wrote:
    This was the interior this aircraft retired with in 1991.

    Polot wrote:
    Closed bins were around in narrow bodies since the 70s. Closed bins were part of the “widebody” cabin that Boeing offered (either directly or retrofitted) on the <a href="tel:707/727/737">707/727/737</a> to relate to the 747. Aftermarket companies quickly followed.

    The bins on this 727 are not the widebody cabin bins though, they are aftermarket or a later Boeing offering.

    Here are some photos showing the original hat racks, the wide body interior, and the modern style overheads on the 727:



    smithbs wrote:
    Also interesting with the interior design, with the mid-galley and then the coat compartments forward of the galley. Today those would just be crammed with more seats.

    The placement of the right-hand service door/emergency exit on the 727-100 was always intriguing, part way down the fuselage instead of opposite the left-hand entry door. I would assume the thinking was having the galley in the mid section allowed easier movement both forward and rearward in the cabin, though I would be keen to hear of there were other design considerations at play here.



    Come the 727-200, the right-hand door was moved to be opposite the left-hand:



    V/F


    The reason for the positioning of the 1R door was to ensure that 727-100 combis would have two full sized emergency exits in a pax-heavy combi configuration. There was an aft galley on a combi. In a 2 pallet/76 pax configuration, the bulkhead was directly in front of 1R. In a 3/54 (going from memory...would have to pull out my old F/A manuals) the bulkhead was in front of the overwing exits.

    As I recall about a quarter of 721s built were combis. My former employer First Air operates several 721 combis over a period of almost 20 years. So in a 3 or 4 pallet combi config, 1R was inaccessible. In fact in a 4/34 config only 1 F/A was required on-board and only the aft airstairs were available as an exit.


    Thanks for the informative post! Yep, lots of carriers bought the 727-100 combis, although they really didn't last long in service on the legacy carriers, presumably because they were heavy and thus inefficient as passenger aircraft after the 1973 oil shock and price spike. I can't imagine the 4-pallet configuration with just the aft airstairs as the sole exit. If the aircraft went off the runway onto uneven terrain - especially with it heavy tail and engines - it would be easy for those stairs to get blocked, thus turning the airplane into a firetrap. I know certification standards are much tougher now for combis for some of these very reasons. Still, I wish I would have gotten to work a combi. There is a great video floating around the internet of one of Nolinor's (recently retired) Convair 580 combis, and it gives you a great sense of the logistics.
     
    PSAatSAN4Ever
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sat May 16, 2020 6:33 pm

    afcjets wrote:
    PSAatSAN4Ever wrote:
    May, 1986, SBA-BFL. At the time UA was trying to link BFL with other locations for SFO and DEN service, with two triangle-routed SFO-BFL-SBA-SFO and SFO-SBA-BFL-SFO flights per day. I took advantage to visit a friend in Santa Barbara, with the outbound stage on a 737-222, and the return was listed as "727", with no further information. I assumed it was to be a 727-200, which was much more common, but when the plane showed up, luckily for me it was a 727-100.


    The equipment code for the 727-100 was 727 and was 72S for the 727-200, which was also referred to as 727 Stretch.


    The one and only plane ticket I ever bought at BFL airport at the ticket counter was this one, and I remember asking what the planes were, as United changed their service frequently. The woman that sold me the ticket said, "it's a 737 going, and a 727 on the return". I inquired further as to whether that was a -100 or a -200, and with a bit of surprise in her eye (obviously surprised anyone would know the difference), but she looked back at her screen and said, "hmmm, it doesn't say. It could be either - you'll find out that day".

    Thankfully it turned out to be the -100, as I never flew on one again. I was fortunate enough to be on a Mexicana 727-200 (XA-MEL) in August, 1997 for my last 727 trip ever.
     
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    c933103
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sat May 16, 2020 6:45 pm

    Behind the right side of row 3 seats, there are still pocket for magazines and folded table behind the seat despite the seat was right in front of a wall
    It's pointless to attempt winning internet debate.
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    longhauler
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sat May 16, 2020 7:01 pm

    TW870 wrote:
    I can't imagine the 4-pallet configuration with just the aft airstairs as the sole exit. If the aircraft went off the runway onto uneven terrain - especially with it heavy tail and engines - it would be easy for those stairs to get blocked, thus turning the airplane into a firetrap. I know certification standards are much tougher now for combis for some of these very reasons.

    The 4 pallet configuration was the maximum allowed in a Combi configuration on the 727-100. This was for the very reason you cite. With 4 pallets, the four over wing exits were still accessible. Not only was more than one exit required, but also wing exits were required for a water landing.

    I am sure the FAA viewed the rear stair exit with some skepticism. Much like the tail cone exit of the DC-9, it wouldn’t take much for it to be inoperable.
    Just because I stopped arguing, doesn't mean I think you are right. It just means I gave up!
     
    Jo8338
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sat May 16, 2020 8:26 pm

    Any other airlines available to show like this?
     
    Dominion301
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sat May 16, 2020 8:49 pm

    longhauler wrote:
    TW870 wrote:
    I can't imagine the 4-pallet configuration with just the aft airstairs as the sole exit. If the aircraft went off the runway onto uneven terrain - especially with it heavy tail and engines - it would be easy for those stairs to get blocked, thus turning the airplane into a firetrap. I know certification standards are much tougher now for combis for some of these very reasons.

    The 4 pallet configuration was the maximum allowed in a Combi configuration on the 727-100. This was for the very reason you cite. With 4 pallets, the four over wing exits were still accessible. Not only was more than one exit required, but also wing exits were required for a water landing.

    I am sure the FAA viewed the rear stair exit with some skepticism. Much like the tail cone exit of the DC-9, it wouldn’t take much for it to be inoperable.


    Another thing is that the movable bulkhead had a small sliding door to allow for the cabin crew to access the flight deck. So in an emergency passengers could theoretically exit by one of the front exits. Now that I have my F/A manual, the smallest passenger configuration was 5 pallets, 31 pax. The overwings were only accessible via the bulkhead door. I never actually flew in that configuration but I was trained on it.

    The 732 combi’s smallest pax config is 6 pallets, 12 pax!
     
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    longhauler
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sun May 17, 2020 12:39 am

    Dominion301 wrote:
    Another thing is that the movable bulkhead had a small sliding door to allow for the cabin crew to access the flight deck. So in an emergency passengers could theoretically exit by one of the front exits. Now that I have my F/A manual, the smallest passenger configuration was 5 pallets, 31 pax. The overwings were only accessible via the bulkhead door. I never actually flew in that configuration but I was trained on it.

    I’m going to guess that Transport Canada didn’t approve of the configuration. I notice that the First Air 727-100 safety card shows the 2 pallet configuration (galley service door as an exit) and the 4 pallet configuration (with overwing exits) but nothing else other than all passenger.

    I flew the 737-200 combi at CP. There were a couple configurations in our Pilot Operating Manual that we’re never eventually approved. One thing I recall is that we always had to carry 2 Flight Attendants, even in the 5 pallet/24 pax configuration!
    Just because I stopped arguing, doesn't mean I think you are right. It just means I gave up!
     
    F9Animal
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sun May 17, 2020 12:45 am

    vhtje wrote:
    I stumbled across this on a group I am a member of on Facebook, thought I would share:

    https://my.matterport.com/show/?m=rtPb7TAsPC8&fbclid=IwAR1PrxW15K_ikBC1-JM89rVjii_wFOsHv_QwZV_GK1qgBsgPHRji1XuGjwY

    Three things that strike me are:

    1) The generous legroom, even in Economy
    2) The garish interior (it was the 1970s, the decade taste forgot, I suppose)
    3) How small the galley is - no ovens. Presumably they were only used on short sectors?

    Do make sure you navigate all the way into the cockpit and to the rear door/jumpseat. Enjoy!


    This is absolutely awesome!! Wish we could have stuff like this for all the museum planes! If I recall, nobody can go inside this particular aircraft? I know the NASA 737 was not setup for an interior walkthrough. Isn't technology something awesome?
    I Am A Different Animal!!
     
    Dominion301
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sun May 17, 2020 1:21 am

    longhauler wrote:
    Dominion301 wrote:
    Another thing is that the movable bulkhead had a small sliding door to allow for the cabin crew to access the flight deck. So in an emergency passengers could theoretically exit by one of the front exits. Now that I have my F/A manual, the smallest passenger configuration was 5 pallets, 31 pax. The overwings were only accessible via the bulkhead door. I never actually flew in that configuration but I was trained on it.

    I’m going to guess that Transport Canada didn’t approve of the configuration. I notice that the First Air 727-100 safety card shows the 2 pallet configuration (galley service door as an exit) and the 4 pallet configuration (with overwing exits) but nothing else other than all passenger.

    I flew the 737-200 combi at CP. There were a couple configurations in our Pilot Operating Manual that we’re never eventually approved. One thing I recall is that we always had to carry 2 Flight Attendants, even in the 5 pallet/24 pax configuration!


    I do remember the 5/24 config on the 732. It was the most common configuration on the cargo-heavy, pax light YWG-YRT route.

    I’m just about certain 5/31 was approved by TC for use. It was in our F/A manuals...and TC would have approved those. I never flew that config but I was only an F/A for a few months of my entire tenure at 7F. Most of my time spent there was in head office and on the ground at YOW.

    The coolest was the Hawker 748...which Air North still have a pair of. The combi bulkhead could be moved anywhere. We’d sometimes only have 2 rows = 8 seats! Might have had only 1 row occasionally.
     
    Dominion301
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sun May 17, 2020 2:05 am

    I went on the internet archive and tried to find the 7F 721 configurations, but unfortunately to no avail. But the combi configs for the world’s only 722 combi I did locate.

    Image
     
    Cody
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    Re: Virtual tour of UA 727-022

    Sun May 17, 2020 2:45 am

    Can any United employees from the 1980s help me? The very last United DC-8 economy cabin was grey seats with orange and red squares and the 747sp's some of the DC-10's had this as well. They had a sort of NBC peacock design on the bulkheads.

    The first 767's were delivered with the grey seats and rainbow diamond pattern down the middle. This interior would later migrate to the rest of the fleet with the exception of the DC-8.

    So a few questions about the last DC-8 interior with the grey seats and red and orange squares.. Why was it operated alongside the brown one that we see on this 727-100 as well as the grey, rainbow seats that came with the 767s? The 767 pattern was migrating to the rest of the fleet, yet at the same time this other grey seat pattern from the DC-8 was being put into some of the DC-10s and 747s. Was this interior on other types as well?

    Also, can anyone confirm another United interior in the 80s, possibly on the 737-200 that featured solid blue seats with a wavy grey bulkhead? It was featured in the movie, "When Harry Met Sally."

    Why so many different interiors at once for United in the 1980s?

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