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LHA320
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Posts: 150
Joined: Sat Jun 24, 2017 10:57 pm

BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Wed Feb 03, 2021 2:27 pm

I was scrolling trough Youtube today and found this video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNAlvHYlS7Y

There is even an 737 classic simulator left. What a waste! Do any of the BA guys know why the whole facility was abandoned? Why did they left all the simulators and equipment?
As I found out trough Google maps it is close to LHR. But with the (pre corona) estate prices in that area, why wasn't it redeveloped?

https://www.google.de/maps/place/Heathr ... -0.4542955 (I think it is this one)

Really reminds me of some zombie acapolypse movie.

Stay safe.
AB6 - A319 - A320 - A321 - A333 - A388 - AT42 - 733 - 734 - 735 - 73H - 738 - 752 - 753 - 763 - 772 - DC10 - MD83
 
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ClassicLover
Posts: 5254
Joined: Tue Mar 09, 2004 12:27 pm

Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Wed Feb 03, 2021 2:33 pm

LHA320 wrote:
There is even an 737 classic simulator left. What a waste! Do any of the BA guys know why the whole facility was abandoned? Why did they left all the simulators and equipment?

As I found out trough Google maps it is close to LHR. But with the (pre corona) estate prices in that area, why wasn't it redeveloped?


There's more info here - https://travelupdate.com/abandoned-ba-cranebank-video/

Apparently all the other simulators were taken to the new building, but the Boeing 737-400 one was deemed surplus to requirements and left there. Also, people apparently illegally accessed the building and stole all the valuable copper wire, which is why so much is taken apart.

From what I gather the building has been sold/is being sold. It was full of asbestos, so BA decided they didn't need it anymore, took what they could re-use and left everything else.

I would have taken those cabin trainers off their hands, if I had the space - and I imagine lots of other aviation people would have liked some of the stuff in there. Crazy that it was all left and not donated (especially the simulator!) or offered for sale.
I do enjoy a spot of flying, especially when it's not in economy!
 
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Crosswind
Posts: 2679
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2000 4:34 am

Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Wed Feb 03, 2021 3:07 pm

LHA320 wrote:
There is even an 737 classic simulator left. What a waste! Do any of the BA guys know why the whole facility was abandoned? Why did they left all the simulators and equipment?
As I found out trough Google maps it is close to LHR. But with the (pre corona) estate prices in that area, why wasn't it redeveloped?

https://www.google.de/maps/place/Heathr ... -0.4542955 (I think it is this one)

Really reminds me of some zombie acapolypse movie.


Cranebank was on it's last legs last time I was there shortly before it was closed in 2015. I'd have expected that it would have needed increasing amounts of investment to keep it habitable as the years went on. The training facilities was relocated to modernized premises within the airline's Heathrow buildingstock.

The 737-400 sim was surplus to requirements, and appears to have been stripped of any useful components Only the shell and motion system remain.
Similarly the cabin simulators were no longer required.

The new facilities
Image
Image
 
tonystan
Posts: 1747
Joined: Sat Jan 07, 2006 7:39 am

Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Wed Feb 03, 2021 3:12 pm

It’s quite a shock to see. Iv spent what feels like years in those hallowed halls and compared to the facility which replaced it I would be back in a shot. Such a shame the B747 and B737 cabin sims could not be recovered. The B747 Upper Deck door trainer which was once supported at a realistic and rather nerve wrecking height inside the same hall (with an emergency circus net directly under the door) was moved to a less dramatic platform in the new training facility along with all the other door trainers (including the Concorde door) and slide raft platforms. The static B777 cabin trainer and one or two of the other generic trainers transferred over too but after that it was all new stuff.
My views are my own and do not reflect any other person or organisation.
 
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alberchico
Posts: 3351
Joined: Fri Sep 24, 2004 5:52 am

Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Wed Feb 03, 2021 4:05 pm

I'm surprised they didn't donate some of those cabin trainers to a museum at least for the tax write offs. That 747 could have made an amazing hands on exhibit. What a missed opportunity. Just out of curiosity did BA ever have a Concorde cabin trainer ? If so what happened to it ?
short summary of every jewish holiday: they tried to kill us ,we won , lets eat !
 
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vhtje
Posts: 1329
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 12:40 pm

Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Wed Feb 03, 2021 4:09 pm

Good one guys. Openly film yourself trespassing, and name yourselves in the video, then post it on the internet for all to see.

Mind you, the UK police are so useless, they probably won't do anything.

I did do a 'safety awareness course' in that very facility back in February 2015. It was a paid thing; I basically paid money to go through a series of emergency procedures, like a fire in a 737, a mock crash landing (complete with shaking simulator), opening and operating an emergency overwing exit, and, of course, sliding down the emergency slide. I think it cost in the region of £150. Worth every penny. From memory, I had seen it advertised in High Life magazine.

The flight stuff was all fun, but what I remember most about that course, probably because it terrified me the most, was being told about what fire safety checks the crew do when checking into a hotel. The captain, apparently, has the responsibility to ensure that the hotel the crew is staying in has satisfactory safety and fire arrangements: things like operating sprinklers, emergency lighting, and escape routes. The short cut was: in a developed western country you are probably going to be okay and can relax; but if you are staying in an hotel in a less regulated country, check. It's not unknown, for example, for people to use fire escapes as storage facilities, or for fire escape doors to be locked or blocked. You do not want to discover that during an emergency, so check first. I now, do. The instructor told some very chilling stories.
I only turn left when boarding aircraft. Well, mostly. All right, sometimes. OH OKAY - rarely.
 
bennett123
Posts: 10865
Joined: Sun Aug 15, 2004 12:49 am

Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Wed Feb 03, 2021 4:38 pm

Is trespass a civil or criminal offence.

If it is the former, would BA need to take legal action.

If they claimed damages, things could get silly.
 
ChrisKen
Posts: 1076
Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 11:15 pm

Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Wed Feb 03, 2021 4:45 pm

bennett123 wrote:
Is trespass a civil or criminal offence.

It can be either these days. Mostly it's a civil thing but circumstances in which it becomes a criminal offence are usually trespass on educational premises, railway property, protected sites, etc.
 
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armagnac2010
Posts: 158
Joined: Sun Jun 07, 2020 12:45 am

Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Wed Feb 03, 2021 5:09 pm

Be careful. The trespassers might in fact sue BA, because they were exposed to asbestos… Half joking only, unfortunately.
 
Kraken27
Posts: 12
Joined: Thu Sep 24, 2020 8:54 pm

Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Wed Feb 03, 2021 5:39 pm

bennett123 wrote:
Is trespass a civil or criminal offence.

If it is the former, would BA need to take legal action.

If they claimed damages, things could get silly.


In the UK, trespass is a civil offence. Thus the common sign you see saying "Trespassers will be prosecuted" has little value, as only criminal offences are prosecuted through the courts by the police / Crown Prosecution Service.

If BA want to pursue the matter, then they can do so through the civil courts.
 
BealineV953
Posts: 296
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2019 10:00 am

Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Sat Feb 06, 2021 10:11 am

ClassicLover wrote:
LHA320 wrote:
Do any of the BA guys know why the whole facility was abandoned? Why did they left all the simulators and equipment?

As I found out trough Google maps it is close to LHR. But with the (pre corona) estate prices in that area, why wasn't it redeveloped?


Apparently all the other simulators were taken to the new building, but the Boeing 737-400 one was deemed surplus to requirements and left there.
Also, people apparently illegally accessed the building and stole all the valuable copper wire, which is why so much is taken apart.

From what I gather the building has been sold/is being sold. It was full of asbestos, so BA decided they didn't need it anymore, took what they could re-use and left everything else.

Crazy that it was all left and not donated (especially the simulator!) or offered for sale.


The simulators were moved from the Cranebank training centre to 'Technical Block A' at Hatton Cross. See the pictures posted by Crosswind. They are in an area on the ground floor of TBA that was originally used for engine and avionics overhaul.
The classrooms relocated to TBC. They are, IIRC, on a floor that was once BA's London call centre.
BA did not own the land at Cranebank; it was leasehold not freehold. I believe that BA moved out when the lease ended, and so BA now has no interest in the property.
Ever since childhood, when I lived within sight of London Airport, I have seldom seen a plane go by and not wished I was on it.”
With apologies to Paul Theroux - ‘The Great Railway Bazaar’
 
BealineV953
Posts: 296
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2019 10:00 am

Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Sat Feb 06, 2021 10:13 am

Kraken27 wrote:
bennett123 wrote:
Is trespass a civil or criminal offence.

If it is the former, would BA need to take legal action.

If they claimed damages, things could get silly.


In the UK, trespass is a civil offence. Thus the common sign you see saying "Trespassers will be prosecuted" has little value, as only criminal offences are prosecuted through the courts by the police / Crown Prosecution Service.

If BA want to pursue the matter, then they can do so through the civil courts.


BA did not own the land at Cranebank; it was leasehold not freehold.
I believe that BA moved out when the lease ended, and so BA now has no interest in the property.
Ever since childhood, when I lived within sight of London Airport, I have seldom seen a plane go by and not wished I was on it.”
With apologies to Paul Theroux - ‘The Great Railway Bazaar’
 
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Lighthouse
Posts: 16
Joined: Sat Jan 02, 2021 11:38 am

Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Sat Feb 06, 2021 10:37 am

I think people have got better things to do right now than pursue legal action against two blokes wandering around an abandoned building. Anything of value is clearly long gone.

Interesting video though.
 
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Aesma
Posts: 14633
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Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Sat Feb 06, 2021 5:01 pm

I didn't think it was only 5 years since it closed, it looks in horrible shape.
New Technology is the name we give to stuff that doesn't work yet. Douglas Adams
 
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Aaron747
Posts: 15662
Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2003 2:07 am

Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Sun Feb 07, 2021 5:51 am

vhtje wrote:
Good one guys. Openly film yourself trespassing, and name yourselves in the video, then post it on the internet for all to see.

Mind you, the UK police are so useless, they probably won't do anything.

I did do a 'safety awareness course' in that very facility back in February 2015. It was a paid thing; I basically paid money to go through a series of emergency procedures, like a fire in a 737, a mock crash landing (complete with shaking simulator), opening and operating an emergency overwing exit, and, of course, sliding down the emergency slide. I think it cost in the region of £150. Worth every penny. From memory, I had seen it advertised in High Life magazine.

The flight stuff was all fun, but what I remember most about that course, probably because it terrified me the most, was being told about what fire safety checks the crew do when checking into a hotel. The captain, apparently, has the responsibility to ensure that the hotel the crew is staying in has satisfactory safety and fire arrangements: things like operating sprinklers, emergency lighting, and escape routes. The short cut was: in a developed western country you are probably going to be okay and can relax; but if you are staying in an hotel in a less regulated country, check. It's not unknown, for example, for people to use fire escapes as storage facilities, or for fire escape doors to be locked or blocked. You do not want to discover that during an emergency, so check first. I now, do. The instructor told some very chilling stories.


I would expect nothing less from a dude with gauges in his ears...at least they're articulate enough. Nevermind...skimmed through and the dude was saying imbecilic stuff like 'how do planes this big even fly...' or 'how do container ships float'? FFS...
If you need someone to blame / throw a rock in the air / you'll hit someone guilty
 
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masonite
Posts: 46
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2016 10:58 pm

Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Sun Feb 07, 2021 6:18 am

The producers of Mysteries of the Abandoned need to get on this.
A320, B712, B737, B738, B739, B752, B753, B763, B772, B789, CRJ2, CRJ9, E75S, E75L, MD83, MD90
 
Flugmeister
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Mar 13, 2010 8:26 am

Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Sun Feb 07, 2021 6:57 am

I visited Cranebank in the early 2000s when helping to set up my company's BA first class 'Slingshot' training bed-seat. I was invited to take part in a 737 simulator cabin crew training session. When that fake smoke started to fill the cabin it was really scary, even though you knew it was simulation.
 
BealineV953
Posts: 296
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2019 10:00 am

Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Mon Feb 08, 2021 11:44 am

vhtje wrote:
I did a 'safety awareness course' in that very facility back in February 2015. It was a paid thing; I basically paid money to go through a series of emergency procedures, like a fire in a 737, a mock crash landing (complete with shaking simulator), opening and operating an emergency overwing exit, and, of course, sliding down the emergency slide. I think it cost in the region of £150. Worth every penny.

The flight stuff was all fun, but what I remember most about that course, probably because it terrified me the most, was being told about what fire safety checks the crew do when checking into a hotel.
The captain, apparently, has the responsibility to ensure that the hotel the crew is staying in has satisfactory safety and fire arrangements: things like operating sprinklers, emergency lighting, and escape routes. The short cut was: in a developed western country you are probably going to be okay and can relax; but if you are staying in an hotel in a less regulated country, check. It's not unknown, for example, for people to use fire escapes as storage facilities, or for fire escape doors to be locked or blocked. You do not want to discover that during an emergency, so check first. I now, do. The instructor told some very chilling stories.


Hello.
BA has a large Security team. They are responsible for a range of things including the safety and security of the hotels used for crew. BA crew hotels must meet demanding safety and security standards. Before BA enters into a contract for a crew hotel, the Security team check it over. If they are not happy, the Procurement (Purchasing) team can not sign a contract with the hotel.
Where BA has a contract with a hotel, the Security team make announced and unannounced visits to check that standards continue to be met.
In some markets, from time to time local country managers may be asked to carry out additional spot checks.
The BA Security team compares notes with other airlines, particularly for high risk destinations.
All of this aims to ensure that a crew arriving at a hotel can be as sure of being safe as anyone staying at a hotel can be.
A Captain or Cabin Service Director may carry out safety checks. A crew can report any concerns to the Flight Operations management team to pass to Security for action. However, if there are serious problems, by the time a crew arrive at a hotel it is more or less impossible to move to another hotel. The objective is to avoid putting a crew in that situation.
BA Flight and Cabin Crew, employees who work in overseas markets and employees who travel on duty regularly receive comprehensive safety training. This includes hotel and fire safety.
At one time the training included film of the fire at Dusseldorf Airport and a fire in an office block in Brazil. The scenes were chilling, but it did make anyone who saw it take fire safety seriously.

As you say, you do not want to discover problems during an emergency, so check first.
If nothing else, be sure of your route to safety. You may have to follow the route in thick smoke and / or darkness, so count the number of doors between your room and the emergency stairs.
Ever since childhood, when I lived within sight of London Airport, I have seldom seen a plane go by and not wished I was on it.”
With apologies to Paul Theroux - ‘The Great Railway Bazaar’
 
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vhtje
Posts: 1329
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 12:40 pm

Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Mon Feb 08, 2021 12:58 pm

BealineV953 wrote:

Hello.
BA has a large Security team. They are responsible for a range of things including the safety and security of the hotels used for crew. BA crew hotels must meet demanding safety and security standards. Before BA enters into a contract for a crew hotel, the Security team check it over. If they are not happy, the Procurement (Purchasing) team can not sign a contract with the hotel.
Where BA has a contract with a hotel, the Security team make announced and unannounced visits to check that standards continue to be met.
In some markets, from time to time local country managers may be asked to carry out additional spot checks.
The BA Security team compares notes with other airlines, particularly for high risk destinations.
All of this aims to ensure that a crew arriving at a hotel can be as sure of being safe as anyone staying at a hotel can be.
A Captain or Cabin Service Director may carry out safety checks. A crew can report any concerns to the Flight Operations management team to pass to Security for action. However, if there are serious problems, by the time a crew arrive at a hotel it is more or less impossible to move to another hotel. The objective is to avoid putting a crew in that situation.
BA Flight and Cabin Crew, employees who work in overseas markets and employees who travel on duty regularly receive comprehensive safety training. This includes hotel and fire safety.
At one time the training included film of the fire at Dusseldorf Airport and a fire in an office block in Brazil. The scenes were chilling, but it did make anyone who saw it take fire safety seriously.

As you say, you do not want to discover problems during an emergency, so check first.
If nothing else, be sure of your route to safety. You may have to follow the route in thick smoke and / or darkness, so count the number of doors between your room and the emergency stairs.


Thank you for your informative post. It is reassuring to know BA take staff safety so very seriously. I wonder if other airlines have similar policies and practices?

A friend of mine was in an hotel fire once - this was in the UK. The fire alarms went off in the middle of the night, so he got up and opened the door. He could see a little bit of smoke in the hallway, so thought he would go back in, get dressed and grab his phone, wallet, etc. In the few moments that took, when he next opened the door to leave, the corridor was thick with smoke hanging from the ceiling, and he could no longer see. The smoke was filling the corridor, and falling to the floor, fast. He had to quickly close the door again to check the escape route on the layout on the back of the door. He then crawled along the floor, counting the doors to the fire escape. He escaped, unharmed, but the hotel did suffer extensive damage. It behoves us all, as hotel guests, to know where the escape routes are, and to ensure they are working.
I only turn left when boarding aircraft. Well, mostly. All right, sometimes. OH OKAY - rarely.
 
Flyerboy89
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Oct 17, 2020 5:46 pm

Re: BA abandoned Training Facility LHR

Mon Feb 08, 2021 4:59 pm

I spent 6 weeks here for my initial training as crew for BA back in 2012 and recurrent up until it moved over to TBC. Such a shame to see it in such a mess now but even back in 2012 it was certainly showing its age.

The runway views from TBC GLA as BA call it were much better than cranebank and on good days you could see as far as th shard in London.

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