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simonriat
Topic Author
Posts: 176
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2010 8:03 pm

Tui 763 squawking 7700 (TOM5GM)

Mon Jun 27, 2022 11:46 am

Hi

Anybody have info.

Flight left Man bound for BVC but appears to have been circling for approx 2 hours (south east of Manchester). I know that the code means general emergency but 2 hours seems a long time for an emergency.

Thanks
Si
 
simonriat
Topic Author
Posts: 176
Joined: Wed Jul 14, 2010 8:03 pm

Re: Tui 763 squawking 7700 (TOM5GM)

Mon Jun 27, 2022 12:15 pm

Well it looks like it landed safely.
 
sk736
Posts: 752
Joined: Tue Aug 08, 2006 4:47 am

Re: Tui 763 squawking 7700 (TOM5GM)

Mon Jun 27, 2022 5:10 pm

A friend of mine was on board. Engine failure after takeoff, circled for a couple of hours to burn fuel, then landed safely. Passengers being put up in hotels tonight and replacement flight expected to leave tomorrow.
 
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Rajahdhani
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Re: Tui 763 squawking 7700 (TOM5GM)

Mon Jun 27, 2022 5:23 pm

sk736 wrote:
A friend of mine was on board. Engine failure after takeoff, circled for a couple of hours to burn fuel, then landed safely. Passengers being put up in hotels tonight and replacement flight expected to leave tomorrow.


I get needing to burn off the fuel and/or work in the holding patterns to analyze/act on the engine emergency. That said, do not all 763 have the ability to 'dump' fuel? Not saying that it was called for in this case, however - normally - would that not have been the normal procedure (ascend to about FL100 to allow disspation, sit in a holding pattern, dump, prepare for a safe return)? For those that understand better, are there conditions under which a 'dump' would be unsafe/not advisable? Either way, job very well done by the crew, and here's to a glad resolution to what has become a 'hectic' day for these true professionals (and let's thank Goodness for a moment that we live in a World where these crisis are not only manageable, but our professionals capable and ready to handle it). Once more, not an easy task list - hurrah to the crew!
 
C133
Posts: 208
Joined: Wed Jan 12, 2005 7:34 am

Re: Tui 763 squawking 7700 (TOM5GM)

Mon Jun 27, 2022 6:52 pm

Pretty sure 767s cannot dump fuel, but they can land at takeoff weight. They could have burned off fuel to avoid overweight landing inspections, but only they know.
 
Natflyer
Posts: 710
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Re: Tui 763 squawking 7700 (TOM5GM)

Mon Jun 27, 2022 7:23 pm

C133 wrote:
Pretty sure 767s cannot dump fuel, but they can land at takeoff weight. They could have burned off fuel to avoid overweight landing inspections, but only they know.


As usual here, plenty of erroneous info. Most B767-300ER can dump fuel. That said, an overweight landing inspection takes two mechanics 15-20 minutes. Why they would fly all those holdings before landing makes me think they were not on one engine. Something more to the story.
 
ADB1
Posts: 62
Joined: Sun Jun 25, 2006 7:29 am

Re: Tui 763 squawking 7700 (TOM5GM)

Mon Jun 27, 2022 7:48 pm

Hi everyone, I saw the plane as it came in over Stockport ( around 6 miles from touchdown) He was lined up for 23L which is only used for southwesterly landings in emergency situations I believe. Couldn't be sure but it didn't look like his flaps were extended. According to FR24 the 763 landed at close to 200 knots!! Is this likely? I'm no expert but I believe 150 would be more usual. What great skill these pilots have.
 
ReverseFlow
Posts: 421
Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2022 4:40 pm

Re: Tui 763 squawking 7700 (TOM5GM)

Mon Jun 27, 2022 7:55 pm

Natflyer wrote:
C133 wrote:
Pretty sure 767s cannot dump fuel, but they can land at takeoff weight. They could have burned off fuel to avoid overweight landing inspections, but only they know.


As usual here, plenty of erroneous info. Most B767-300ER can dump fuel. That said, an overweight landing inspection takes two mechanics 15-20 minutes. Why they would fly all those holdings before landing makes me think they were not on one engine. Something more to the story.


Risk mitigation?
As if you find something during those inspections you'll have more on your plate than flying around to dump/burn fuel.

Perhaps the jettison is optional?
As I can't see an outlet on the wing here

https://www.airliners.net/photo/TUI-TUI ... lY1xfkXEJE
 
Natflyer
Posts: 710
Joined: Fri Oct 11, 2013 9:29 pm

Re: Tui 763 squawking 7700 (TOM5GM)

Mon Jun 27, 2022 8:05 pm

ReverseFlow wrote:
Natflyer wrote:
C133 wrote:
Pretty sure 767s cannot dump fuel, but they can land at takeoff weight. They could have burned off fuel to avoid overweight landing inspections, but only they know.


As usual here, plenty of erroneous info. Most B767-300ER can dump fuel. That said, an overweight landing inspection takes two mechanics 15-20 minutes. Why they would fly all those holdings before landing makes me think they were not on one engine. Something more to the story.


Risk mitigation?
As if you find something during those inspections you'll have more on your plate than flying around to dump/burn fuel.

Perhaps the jettison is optional?
As I can't see an outlet on the wing here

https://www.airliners.net/photo/TUI-TUI ... lY1xfkXEJE


Fuel dumping was optional. As were the installation of one or two pumps for dumping rate. The only 767 I flew without dump capability was a non-ER.
And the fuel dump outlet (like a male member) is very visible in this picture, between the outboard flap and the aileron.
 
deebee278
Posts: 133
Joined: Tue Oct 10, 2017 8:14 pm

Re: Tui 763 squawking 7700 (TOM5GM)

Mon Jun 27, 2022 8:14 pm

Natflyer wrote:
C133 wrote:
Pretty sure 767s cannot dump fuel, but they can land at takeoff weight. They could have burned off fuel to avoid overweight landing inspections, but only they know.


As usual here, plenty of erroneous info. Most B767-300ER can dump fuel. That said, an overweight landing inspection takes two mechanics 15-20 minutes. Why they would fly all those holdings before landing makes me think they were not on one engine. Something more to the story.


I think you're right. 'My' airline had many early model 763s that couldn't dump. The newer ones did. Someone replied that the aircraft could land at max takeoff weight if needed. There are charts the crew can refer to to determine if the runway length is acceptable. No professional is going to fly in circles for over two hours on one engine. I think they encountered an abnormal that required the engine be left in idle. Therefore, there was no immediate need to land...My Guess
 
TC957
Posts: 4419
Joined: Wed May 23, 2012 1:12 pm

Re: Tui 763 squawking 7700 (TOM5GM)

Mon Jun 27, 2022 10:10 pm

The 767 suffered an engine failure - it's on Aviation Herald now.
 
32andBelow
Posts: 6284
Joined: Mon Sep 03, 2012 2:54 am

Re: Tui 763 squawking 7700 (TOM5GM)

Mon Jun 27, 2022 11:37 pm

Why do ifr airplanes on discrete codes squawk emergency in Europe?
 
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DocLightning
Posts: 22350
Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2005 8:51 am

Re: Tui 763 squawking 7700 (TOM5GM)

Tue Jun 28, 2022 2:54 am

ReverseFlow wrote:
Perhaps the jettison is optional?
As I can't see an outlet on the wing here

https://www.airliners.net/photo/TUI-TUI ... lY1xfkXEJE


Just outboard of the outboard flaps and just inboard of the outboard aileron is a small tube.
 
ReverseFlow
Posts: 421
Joined: Mon Mar 14, 2022 4:40 pm

Re: Tui 763 squawking 7700 (TOM5GM)

Tue Jun 28, 2022 4:32 am

Natflyer wrote:
ReverseFlow wrote:
Natflyer wrote:

As usual here, plenty of erroneous info. Most B767-300ER can dump fuel. That said, an overweight landing inspection takes two mechanics 15-20 minutes. Why they would fly all those holdings before landing makes me think they were not on one engine. Something more to the story.


Risk mitigation?
As if you find something during those inspections you'll have more on your plate than flying around to dump/burn fuel.

Perhaps the jettison is optional?
As I can't see an outlet on the wing here

https://www.airliners.net/photo/TUI-TUI ... lY1xfkXEJE


Fuel dumping was optional. As were the installation of one or two pumps for dumping rate. The only 767 I flew without dump capability was a non-ER.
And the fuel dump outlet (like a male member) is very visible in this picture, between the outboard flap and the aileron.
DocLightning wrote:
ReverseFlow wrote:
Perhaps the jettison is optional?
As I can't see an outlet on the wing here

https://www.airliners.net/photo/TUI-TUI ... lY1xfkXEJE


Just outboard of the outboard flaps and just inboard of the outboard aileron is a small tube.
Thanks, yes. My sh!tty resolution on my phone doesn't help!
 
User avatar
LTU330
Posts: 260
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2005 4:40 pm

Re: Tui 763 squawking 7700 (TOM5GM)

Tue Jun 28, 2022 2:34 pm

Natflyer wrote:
C133 wrote:
Pretty sure 767s cannot dump fuel, but they can land at takeoff weight. They could have burned off fuel to avoid overweight landing inspections, but only they know.


As usual here, plenty of erroneous info. Most B767-300ER can dump fuel. That said, an overweight landing inspection takes two mechanics 15-20 minutes. Why they would fly all those holdings before landing makes me think they were not on one engine. Something more to the story.


If two Mechanics are doing an Overweight Landing check in 15 to 20 minutes, they aren't doing it correctly. There are many other criteria to also consider based on what the Pilot reported, but even the basic Overweight Landing check isn't done in effectively 0.6 Manhours.
 
sk736
Posts: 752
Joined: Tue Aug 08, 2006 4:47 am

Re: Tui 763 squawking 7700 (TOM5GM)

Tue Jun 28, 2022 4:29 pm

Natflyer wrote:
C133 wrote:
Pretty sure 767s cannot dump fuel, but they can land at takeoff weight. They could have burned off fuel to avoid overweight landing inspections, but only they know.


As usual here, plenty of erroneous info. Most B767-300ER can dump fuel. That said, an overweight landing inspection takes two mechanics 15-20 minutes. Why they would fly all those holdings before landing makes me think they were not on one engine. Something more to the story.

I provided the answer earlier in the thread…did you read it? My friend is not hard of hearing and made no mistake with reporting what the Captain had told her and the other passengers - there was an engine failure after takeoff and they circled to burn fuel before landing. Quite why you think you know something different is a mystery.

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