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scaredflyer21
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FA Type Training

Fri Oct 06, 2006 6:06 am

I'm doing a report on aviation safety at school, and had a quick question. If a flight attendant is hired for a carrier that has several types of aircraft, is he/she trained on all of these types, or just a select few. It just seems like airlines such as Southwest and JetBlue might have the advantage, as their fa's can be more thoroughly trained than carriers with a larger number of aircraft.

Thanks - Scaredflyer21
 
aa757first
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RE: FA Type Training

Fri Oct 06, 2006 9:59 am

Yes and no.

No, a flight attendant doesn't have to be trained on all of a carrier's fleet types. However, they can't fly that type until they are trained on it. That makes it very unpractical. For example, I have a flight attendant scheduled to fly PHL-ORD-PHL on a MD-80. ORD is snowed in and the flight is cancelled. Coincidently, I need an extra flight attendant for a PHL-MIA-PHL segment. The only problem is this flight is on a A321, which she can't fly, since she isn't trained on it.

So, yes, in all likelyhood, the flight attendants on your carrier are trained all on aircraft in the airline's fleet. It actually isn't a big deal to train a flight attendant on a new type. Since they are all ready trained in first aid, evacuations, hijackings, boarding procedures, etc. they don't need to be re-trained in that. It's just exit operation, galley features, IFE, etc. Maybe one or two days?

In some countries, FAs may only be trained in a certain number of aircraft. This is not the case in the US.

AAndrew
 
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Zkpilot
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RE: FA Type Training

Fri Oct 06, 2006 1:26 pm

QF F/A's are trained on several types... 744, 743, 763 GE/RR, A332, A333 and someday if it ever gets built A388.

NZ F/A's are trained on 744, 772, 763.

EK F/A's are trained either on Boeing or Airbus not both.
64 types. 45 countries. 24 airlines.
 
scaredflyer21
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RE: FA Type Training

Fri Oct 06, 2006 1:41 pm

Thanks for the replies. So with this in mind, how long is the training for different carriers. For instance, does Southwest have a shorter training period than say American or United with their more diverse fleets?

Scaredflyer21
 
mjlhou
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RE: FA Type Training

Fri Oct 06, 2006 1:54 pm

Hello Scaredflyer21!

Yes...all F/As flying for a US flag carrier are trained on all of their aircraft, and for one major reason.

1.) For efficiency and utilization: when an FA is on reserve or being re-routed for that matter, some airlines may obviously need to send the FA to any of the destinations they fly to. AA is one of the only US carriers I know of that separates it's international and domestic crews, however, they are still trained on the entire fleet. These destinations, may in turn, be operated by very different aircraft. FA utilization would be very limited if the carrier were not to train it's FAs on all aircraft. I hope this helps and good luck with your research.

Cheers

MJL
Don't worry about things you can't change or control
 
mjlhou
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RE: FA Type Training

Fri Oct 06, 2006 1:56 pm

Quoting Scaredflyer21 (Reply 3):
Thanks for the replies. So with this in mind, how long is the training for different carriers. For instance, does Southwest have a shorter training period than say American or United with their more diverse fleets?

No problem......for WN it's approx. 4 weeks.

For AA approx. 4-5 weeks or at least used to be.

Cheers, again
Don't worry about things you can't change or control
 
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Zkpilot
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RE: FA Type Training

Fri Oct 06, 2006 2:01 pm

Quoting Scaredflyer21 (Reply 3):
Thanks for the replies. So with this in mind, how long is the training for different carriers. For instance, does Southwest have a shorter training period than say American or United with their more diverse fleets?

QF is 7-8 weeks for longhaul , NZ is 7 weeks I think for Longhaul, and about 3 weeks for shorthaul (A320/737).
64 types. 45 countries. 24 airlines.
 
VHXLR8
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RE: FA Type Training

Sat Oct 07, 2006 12:10 pm

Quoting Aa757first (Reply 1):
It's just exit operation, galley features, IFE, etc. Maybe one or two days?

Well it's actually a bit more involved than that. There's also equipment locations, aircraft systems, emergency procedures specific to a particular a/c type etc.
Things like galley features/IFE are not generally included in type certification, unless they relate to safety. Otherwise they are a service issue.
It's about 2 days per type.

Quoting Scaredflyer21 (Reply 3):
Thanks for the replies. So with this in mind, how long is the training for different carriers. For instance, does Southwest have a shorter training period than say American or United with their more diverse fleets?

Can't say for sure about those airlines you mentioned; but it generally shouldn't make too much difference to the overall training time. Given that the bulk of emergency procudures training is taken up by generic procedures, the specific aircraft 'days' might change things by a few days give or take.
 
Shamrock_747
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RE: FA Type Training

Sun Oct 08, 2006 2:02 am

At BA crew are split into 3 different fleets, trained on either two or three aircraft:

LHR Worldwide - 747/777 + some crew on 767
LHR Eurofleet - 757/767/Airbus
LGW Fleet - 737/777 + some crew on Airbus
 
WNCrew
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RE: FA Type Training

Sun Oct 08, 2006 6:50 am

Quoting Mjlhou (Reply 5):
Yes...all F/As flying for a US flag carrier are trained on all of their aircraft, and for one major reason.

Actually at AA FA's are not trained on all aircraft as there are seperate FA's for Intl. and domestic. I'm not sure if this is true of any other carrier though.
ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
 
FlyEmirates
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RE: FA Type Training

Sun Oct 08, 2006 11:36 am

EK cabin crew are infact trained on 772 773 77W A343 A345 A332 some unlucky people are trained on the A310 IN ADDITION to the aforementioned types. Too many aircraft one could say...
 
iairallie
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RE: FA Type Training

Mon Oct 09, 2006 9:35 am

Quoting Mjlhou (Reply 4):
all F/As flying for a US flag carrier are trained on all of their aircraft

Not true while it is usually common practice to train the entire FA group on all equipment it is not by any means a universal proceedure. At AA in initial training FA's are not trained on all aircraft. The A300 and 777 are used primarily for international routes. All FA's start out domestic you have to bid for international training spaces and go through approximately two more weeks of training where you are trained on the A300 and 777. Also when they flew the Fokker, only FAs going to a Fokker base got trained on that equipment. It was an additonal day of training. When I worked for ASA only FA's going to a Delta Connection base got trained on the Dornier jet only and FA's going to a United Express base got trained on the CRJ and J41 (some UEX groups also got Dornier training).

Quoting Mjlhou (Reply 5):
For AA approx. 4-5 weeks or at least used to be.

No, AA's initial training was 7 and a half weeks. As of 2001 which is the last time they had new hires.
Enough about flying lets talk about me!
 
mjlhou
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RE: FA Type Training

Mon Oct 09, 2006 2:41 pm

Quoting WNCrew (Reply 9):
Quoting Mjlhou (Reply 5):Yes...all F/As flying for a US flag carrier are trained on all of their aircraft, and for one major reason.
Actually at AA FA's are not trained on all aircraft as there are seperate FA's for Intl. and domestic. I'm not sure if this is true of any other carrier though.

ok...as far as I know they are trained initially on all ac in the fleet at the time of training. I do understand that, for example, if an FA is rather senior and flying international and then AA chose the 738, then that FA would not be required to go back and train on it unless they were to bid a route that the 738 were to fly. For example, in 2001, it was on the international bid packet for ORD-CUN for a while. One of my good friends was then sched for training at DFW after he was awarded this bid.

Quoting IAirAllie (Reply 11):
Quoting Mjlhou (Reply 4):all F/As flying for a US flag carrier are trained on all of their aircraft
Not true while it is usually common practice to train the entire FA group on all equipment it is not by any means a universal proceedure. At AA in initial training FA's are not trained on all aircraft. The A300 and 777 are used primarily for international routes. All FA's start out domestic you have to bid for international training spaces and go through approximately two more weeks of training where you are trained on the A300 and 777. Also when they flew the Fokker, only FAs going to a Fokker base got trained on that equipment. It was an additonal day of training. When I worked for ASA only FA's going to a Delta Connection base got trained on the Dornier jet only and FA's going to a United Express base got trained on the CRJ and J41 (some UEX groups also got Dornier training).

again, I'm not sure how this would make sense as I've seen FAs on reserve be used for flights to and from other bases and for all aircraft. I believe that the F-100 was a special case because they were planning to reitre it for some time. I used to work domestic and international ops at ORD for AA until after 9-11, and still have alot of friends who are FAs for them and am only going on what they tell me. I do now realize that some of the other carriers may not have this policy.
Don't worry about things you can't change or control
 
We're Nuts
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RE: FA Type Training

Mon Oct 09, 2006 3:34 pm

The most accurate way to answer this question is the most general.

On the back of my license it lists my ratings. Mine says "Group II", FAA-speak for turbojet-powered aircraft. I am not certified to be a flight attendant on any aircraft with propellers. However if it has jets, I can work it with just a few hours of transition training.

To obtain the "Group I" rating, I would have to go back to class for a few days and learn about the differences in oxygen systems, physical effects, etc.
Dear moderators: No.
 
bwaflyer
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RE: FA Type Training

Mon Oct 09, 2006 7:22 pm

Under CAA rules, UK cabin crew can only operate three types of aircraft. A type would be all variations of 737, A32X, 767-200/300 etc.
 
WNCrew
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RE: FA Type Training

Mon Oct 09, 2006 10:38 pm

Quoting Mjlhou (Reply 12):
I'm not sure how this would make sense as I've seen FAs on reserve be used for flights to and from other bases and for all aircraft.

Yes, you may have seen FA's on Intl RSV being used for Intl trips. The fact still stands, not ALL FA's at AA are trained on all aircraft....the end. Just as IAirAllie pointed out, everyone starts out domestic and then bids Intl. training slots. I just had an AA FA jumpseating on board and she was telling me how since she switched bases to go Intl so she was on her way to learn the 777 and A300.

AA is unique on this front, as ALL other Major US carriers have all FA's crosstrained.
ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
 
MCOflyer
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RE: FA Type Training

Mon Oct 09, 2006 11:12 pm

For RP, you get trained on what you're going to be flying on. For example, a new hire gets hired for US ops and gets put at PHL once he completes his training. He will be trained on the E170/175. After one yr he bids for a SDF base. He will go through training for the E145/135 and CRJ since this is what they fly.

For B6, its my understanding you get trained on both the 190 and 320 since both types fly to the airlines hubs.

If my statements are wrong please correct me.

Happy Flying,
MCOflyer
Never be afraid to stand up for who you are.
 
atct
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RE: FA Type Training

Mon Oct 09, 2006 11:21 pm

I was a f/a on a Saab a while back.

Our training was 3 weeks. (officially).

1 Week of Company Indoc

2 Weeks at Flight Safety Academy.



ATCT

(btw, FlightSafety was great! Really thorough and they know their stuff!)
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HBJZA
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RE: FA Type Training

Tue Oct 10, 2006 2:23 am

In Switzerland, FA's can only be trained on 4 types.
 
mjlhou
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RE: FA Type Training

Tue Oct 10, 2006 6:19 am

Quoting WNCrew (Reply 15):
Quoting Mjlhou (Reply 12):I'm not sure how this would make sense as I've seen FAs on reserve be used for flights to and from other bases and for all aircraft.
Yes, you may have seen FA's on Intl RSV being used for Intl trips. The fact still stands, not ALL FA's at AA are trained on all aircraft....the end. Just as IAirAllie pointed out, everyone starts out domestic and then bids Intl. training slots. I just had an AA FA jumpseating on board and she was telling me how since she switched bases to go Intl so she was on her way to learn the 777 and A300.

AA is unique on this front, as ALL other Major US carriers have all FA's crosstrained.

ok...I don't mean to give a fellow crew member a hard time, but, if you're going to quote me...then read my whole post. Before this section, I explained this very topic. Here it is..........

Quoting Mjlhou (Reply 12):
ok...as far as I know they are trained initially on all ac in the fleet at the time of training. I do understand that, for example, if an FA is rather senior and flying international and then AA chose the 738, then that FA would not be required to go back and train on it unless they were to bid a route that the 738 were to fly. For example, in 2001, it was on the international bid packet for ORD-CUN for a while. One of my good friends was then sched for training at DFW after he was awarded this bid.

Again, I do understand how AA works, as I have actually worked for them before. Let me clarify AGAIN. FAs are trained on all aircraft that areIN THE FLEET AT THE TIME OF TRAINING. For example, Since this FA you speak of is most likely very senior, the 777 and A300(before EASTERN AND PAN AM WENT OUT) were not in the fleet when she started flying with AA......therefore she is training for them now. I hope I made myself clear now. I'll also repeat the fact that I still have many friends who are FAs at AA and have verified that this information is still accurate.

Cheers

MJL

[Edited 2006-10-09 23:44:32]

[Edited 2006-10-09 23:47:32]
Don't worry about things you can't change or control
 
iairallie
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RE: FA Type Training

Tue Oct 10, 2006 11:30 am

Quoting Mjlhou (Reply 19):
Again, I do understand how AA works, as I have actually worked for them before. Let me clarify AGAIN. FAs are trained on all aircraft that areIN THE FLEET AT THE TIME OF TRAINING.

Apparently you do not understand how AA works on the Flight Attendant side just as I would know little about the operations side. I was an AA FA in one of the most recent new hire classes (2001). It is not possible they changed things because there haven't been any new hire classes since 2001.

All AA new hires are put into domestic bases. Domestic equipment does NOT include the 777 or A300. Therefore new hires are not trained on the 777 or A300.

You must bid into an international base opening to recieve additional training on the 777 and A300.

International FA's having started as domestic FA's do not loose their qualifications on the domestic equipment so techinically barring any contractual constraints they can be utilized on any aircraft.
Enough about flying lets talk about me!
 
mjlhou
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RE: FA Type Training

Tue Oct 10, 2006 1:06 pm

ok......AirAllie, as said before, I re-verified this info with 3 friends I have that work for AA (FAs) and have since 1982, '84 and '87 respectively and am only quoting them since I haven't worked for AA since 2001....so again.....I was simply given info....no more, and no less. I also didn't really work the 777 svc between DFW-ORD or DFW-MIA, but are those international FAs AA has on staff just to work a domestic route then. I did work international, and I do know those FAs never continued on that 777 in from DFW to LHR, and that they simply flew back to DFW on the 1830 svc on the 777. Again, I was simply repeating what I was told.

Cheers
Don't worry about things you can't change or control
 
iairallie
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RE: FA Type Training

Tue Oct 10, 2006 1:21 pm

Aren't we stubborn, you have two former AA fa's both of whom went throught initial training more recently than 1987, telling you how the system works and still you insist you know better. Don't take it personally but on this topic you are wrong.
Enough about flying lets talk about me!
 
atrude777
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RE: FA Type Training

Tue Oct 10, 2006 1:30 pm

Don't know if this changes anything, but I was actually just talking to a F/A about this who works for AA and is ORD based.
She told me she is only rated to work on the MD80, 757 and 767.

She is not qualified on the A300, 738 or 777.

Alex
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