thaia345
Topic Author
Posts: 818
Joined: Tue Oct 17, 2006 6:57 pm

Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Fri Dec 08, 2006 1:54 pm

Hey All....

I know ETOPS means extended twin-engined jet operations, but what does it actually mean and serve to do? Is it like how far an aircraft is allowed to travel from a safe minimum distance from an airport?

And also I heard that TG had previous problems with Etops, what were they? Are Etops certified per type of aircraft from the manufacturer or does each respective airline have to gain somesort of certification?
 
beech19
Posts: 887
Joined: Fri Jul 21, 2006 11:30 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Fri Dec 08, 2006 1:58 pm

Its the amount of time a twin engine aircraft is certified to fly on one engine. Its for overwater operations, not from a specific airport.
Each airline must gain ETOPS cert for their aircraft is my understanding. They don't just come with it. Although i beleive the 777 was ETOP's certified from the factory... anyone verify that?
KPAE via KBVY
 
futurecaptain
Posts: 1918
Joined: Sat Sep 09, 2006 1:54 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Fri Dec 08, 2006 1:58 pm

Quoting ThaiA345 (Thread starter):
but what does it actually mean and serve to do?

It allows you to fly a certain distance, in minutes of one engine cruise speed, from a suitable diversion airport. So, if an aircraft has ETOPS 180 it can fly 3 hours from a diversion airport at its one engine out cruise speed and altitude.

Quoting ThaiA345 (Thread starter):
Are Etops certified per type of aircraft from the manufacturer or does each respective airline have to gain somesort of certification?

The airline gets certified and then on top of that each individual aircraft is certified.
AirSO. ASpaceO. ASOnline. ASO.com ASO. ASO. ASO. ASO. ASO.
 
cactushp
Posts: 324
Joined: Mon May 10, 2004 3:36 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Fri Dec 08, 2006 1:59 pm

Quoting ThaiA345 (Thread starter):
Are Etops certified per type of aircraft from the manufacturer or does each respective airline have to gain somesort of certification?

Each airline has to develop their own ETOPS program. For example, when US/HP started Hawaii flights with their 757's, they had to outfit each aircraft with overwater equipment (rafts, lifejackets etc.) Also, the flight attendants have to be trained for ETOPS operations.
Sorry, I was on the landline
 
cactushp
Posts: 324
Joined: Mon May 10, 2004 3:36 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Fri Dec 08, 2006 2:02 pm

Quoting Beech19 (Reply 1):
Its for overwater operations, not from a specific airport.

Not necessary overwater . For example, lets say an aircraft is flying over Africa per say, and suitable landing airports are not within the aircrafts requirements, the aircraft must be ETOPS certified.
Sorry, I was on the landline
 
airbazar
Posts: 9964
Joined: Wed Sep 10, 2003 11:12 pm

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Fri Dec 08, 2006 2:04 pm

Quoting Beech19 (Reply 1):
Its the amount of time a twin engine aircraft is certified to fly on one engine. Its for overwater operations, not from a specific airport.

I don't think it is specific to overwater flight. It's from "any suitable airport". It just so happens that these days most areas without a suitable airport are overwater.
 
beech19
Posts: 887
Joined: Fri Jul 21, 2006 11:30 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Fri Dec 08, 2006 2:35 pm

Quoting CactusHP (Reply 4):
Not necessary overwater . For example, lets say an aircraft is flying over Africa per say, and suitable landing airports are not within the aircrafts requirements, the aircraft must be ETOPS certified.



Quoting Airbazar (Reply 5):
It's from "any suitable airport". It just so happens that these days most areas without a suitable airport are overwater.

Good point. I was curious what the exact wording actually was. Africa is probably the only place where this would be an issue over land i would think... Sahara Desert area mostly?
KPAE via KBVY
 
anax
Posts: 84
Joined: Sat Sep 23, 2006 3:20 pm

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Fri Dec 08, 2006 6:04 pm

Quoting Beech19 (Reply 6):
Good point. I was curious what the exact wording actually was. Africa is probably the only place where this would be an issue over land i would think... Sahara Desert area mostly?

not only the sahara desert , after all it is a relatively "small" area for the size of africa.
more for sub saharan block of countries in central africa , specialy the eastern part of it.
god is a spotter!!!
 
UA772IAD
Posts: 1329
Joined: Sat Jul 10, 2004 7:43 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Fri Dec 08, 2006 6:12 pm

Engines Turn Or People Swim.
 
charlipr
Posts: 262
Joined: Sat Dec 10, 2005 7:12 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Fri Dec 08, 2006 6:18 pm

Quoting Beech19 (Reply 6):
Good point. I was curious what the exact wording actually was. Africa is probably the only place where this would be an issue over land i would think... Sahara Desert area mostly?

It also happens in Russia especially over Siberia!!!!
 
ikramerica
Posts: 15057
Joined: Mon May 23, 2005 9:33 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Fri Dec 08, 2006 8:41 pm

The acronym will eventually be pointless.

http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/EPA-IMPACT/2003/November/Day-14/i28407.htm

The FAA has concluded that just because an airplane has 3 engines doesn't mean it is inherently safer when faced with a non-engine out emergency (medical, fire, pressure, malfunctions).

Twins will be considered a subset of planes that have additional rules, but ETOPS will apply to all jets in the future.
Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
 
RichardPrice
Posts: 4474
Joined: Sat Apr 23, 2005 5:12 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Fri Dec 08, 2006 9:03 pm

Quoting Beech19 (Reply 6):
Good point. I was curious what the exact wording actually was. Africa is probably the only place where this would be an issue over land i would think... Sahara Desert area mostly?

The Himalayas are also ETOPS restricted.
 
Motorhussy
Posts: 3658
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2000 7:49 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Fri Dec 08, 2006 9:17 pm

180 minute ETOPS really only affects Antarctica, the South Pacific, South Atlantic, South Indian oceans and an area of the Eastern Pacific between French Polynesia and Mexico. These only really affect flights between New Zealand and South America and South Africa and Australia in that they're not viable/possible with two engined craft.

MH
come visit the south pacific
 
jetset7e7
Posts: 1009
Joined: Mon Jul 12, 2004 8:56 pm

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Fri Dec 08, 2006 10:31 pm

Quoting Beech19 (Reply 1):
They don't just come with it. Although i beleive the 777 was ETOP's certified from the factory... anyone verify that?

From Wikipedia.org:

The regulations allow an airliner to have ETOPS-120 rating on its entry into service. ETOPS-180 is only possible after 1 year of trouble-free 120-min ETOPS experience. Boeing has convinced the FAA that it could deliver an airliner with ETOPS-180 on its entry into service. This process is called Early ETOPS. Thus the Boeing 777 was the first aircraft to carry an ETOPS rating of 180-min at its introduction


Mark
Retrofitted Blended Winglets - The Future Is On The Wing
 
Dalmd88
Posts: 2990
Joined: Fri Jul 28, 2000 3:19 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 4:17 am

An indivual aircraft has to be ETOPS also. To maintain the ETOPS rating certain parts on the aircraft have to be maintained to the ETOPS standard. I don't know the list so we'll use the Fetzer valve. A/c 782 is a ETOPS aircraft. The Fetzer valve on the nbr 2 engine fails and is replaced with an airworthy, but nonEtops certified Fetzer valve. The aircraft now can fly, but not in an ETOPS enviroment until the valve is changed out with an ETOPS certified valve.

Etops isn't just about the engines either. Besides the crew training and overwater equipment there are other requirements. Fire suppression is a big one. A fire in the cargo hold must be suppressed for the entire ETOPS limit.
 
SP90
Posts: 351
Joined: Wed May 24, 2006 12:39 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 4:39 am

The ETOPS portion of the flight starts as soon as one engine is shutdown right? Let say I have to shutdown one engine after flying for 5 hours, now I have <180 minutes (or <138 or <120 depending on the certification) to reach the nearest suitable landing strip. How is that ETOPS time counted? Does the time count from when the in-flight shutdown occured until the plane is on final or wheels touch down or come to a complete stop on the ground?
 
aviateur
Posts: 562
Joined: Wed Apr 28, 2004 9:25 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 4:43 am

ETOPS is now called EROPS. The emphasis has been taken off the number of engines, per se., and is more about systems reliability and such. When it comes to extended range ops, airlines aren't worried about icrashing, necessarily, after an engine failure.... they're worried about the complications and expenses of having to *DIVERT.* If you're in a 777 and you lose an engine over the North Pole, that could mean a million-dollar diversion to norther Canada or Siberia somewhere.

There's additional info here:
http://www.salon.com/tech/col/smith/...05/03/04/askthepilot126/index.html
Patrick Smith is an airline pilot, air travel columnist and author
 
UAEflyer
Posts: 1236
Joined: Thu Nov 02, 2006 8:29 pm

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 5:45 am

if the ETOPS minutes was 280 or any big number for instance, would that mean that i will reach my destination faster?
as i understood that you should keep airports close to you while flying
 
tommybp251b
Posts: 332
Joined: Thu Apr 06, 2006 5:21 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 6:14 am

Quoting RichardPrice (Reply 11):
The Himalayas are also ETOPS restricted.

Is it really ETOPS??? I just remember a discussion here on A.net where a BA flight from LHR and a LH flight from FRA were compared. Both were going to HKG. I dont know which flight it was but as far as I remember it was the BA flight who is not allowed to fly over Himalaya, cause if he had to divert to let's say to Lhasa, there would be an oxygen issue or something like that.

http://www1.airliners.net/discussion...749764&s=lufthansa+tibet#ID2749764

Found it. The issue is that if there is a depressurization during flight.

"In order to fly over tibet airlines much carry extra oxygen in case of depressurization because it would be impossible to descend to a safe altitude over the extremely high mountains in that area."

So it doesnt matter how many engines the aircraft has.
Tom from Cologne
 
Jetfixr757
Posts: 138
Joined: Thu Jan 26, 2006 9:16 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 6:38 am

ETOPS

Engines
Turn
Or
People
Swim
Just kidding, that's one of the "acronyms" we came up with.
Jet
 
leothedog
Posts: 114
Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2005 2:45 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 6:40 am

Quoting UA772IAD (Reply 8):
Engines Turn Or People Swim.

You beat me to it!!
I've got things to see and people to do.
 
shindig31
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Dec 18, 2005 11:32 pm

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 7:14 am

ETOPS starts the moment an aircraft passes a point that is 60 minutes from the nearest adequate diversion airport (calculated at single engine cruise in still air),meaning there are no longer any diversion airports within 60 minutes of it's present position.ETOPS ends the moment the aircraft ceases to be outside of 60 minutes flying time from an adequate diversion airport.Adequate airport may be defined as an open airport certified to handle the specific aircraft in question.Once in ETOPS an operator is specifically authorized to conduct operations provided they can demonstrate that at no point along the planned route of flight are they greater than a pre-determined number of minutes flying time from a suitable diversion airport.The most common numbers are 120,138,180,212 depending on fleet.Suitable diversion airport may be defined as an adequate airport that meets certain weather conditions at the time the diverted aircraft would arrive.It is common for a carrier to be authorized for multiple numbers on the same fleet and select the lowest number that fulfills that days mission. For example a 777-200 for a specific airline may be authorized for 120/138 and 180 minute ETOPS and the same airlines 767-200 may be authorized for 120 and 138 but not 180.
Once in the ETOPS area the flight plan contains a series designated alternate airports and waypoint along its intended route of flight that give the Captain guidance to what his/her nearest ETOPS alternate is.For example on a flight from New York to London conducted under 120 minute ETOPS rules the assigned ETOPS alternates could be Gander,Keflavik and Shannon and the Captains flight plan would include the specific points along the route of flight that are equal distances form Gander and Keflavik and Keflavik and Shannon.So if an engine failure occurs prior to the equal distance point between Gander and Keflavik then turning around and heading back to Gander would be recommended since it would be closer.Conversely if an engine failure occurred after the Gander Keflavik equal distance point but prior to the Keflavik Shannon equal distance point than a diversion to Keflavik would be recommended. At no point along the ETOPS portion of the route of flight would the aircraft be greater than 120 minutes from at least 1 of the 3 named alternate airports .
In addition to proving that the aircraft is always within the pre-determined number of ETOPS minutes from a suitable airport a carrier is also required to prove that it has sufficient fuel to make it to its diversion alternate from the most critical point along its route.An aircraft experiencing an engine loss is unlikely to be able to maintain a higher (more fuel efficient) flight level and will likely have to descend or driftdown thus burning significantly more fuel than it would otherwise do with both engines still running.So on some ETOPS flights (IE West coast to/from Hawaii) additional fuel is planned to fulfil this contingency.
 
GlobalVillage
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon Oct 30, 2006 5:36 pm

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 11:21 am

Quoting Aviateur (Reply 16):
ETOPS is now called EROPS.

You mean LROPS (Long Range Operational Performance Standards), right? This new system still might not be used, especially seeing as it eliminates a four engined aircraft's only advantage- bad for Airbus.  Wink
 
ikramerica
Posts: 15057
Joined: Mon May 23, 2005 9:33 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 11:30 am

Quoting GlobalVillage (Reply 22):
seeing as it eliminates a four engined aircraft's only advantage

Airbus can't sell the 350XWB while talking out of the other side of it's mouth about the lack of safety of twins...

The reason it's taken so long to get beyond ETOPS 207 is because it only suited Boeing. Now, nobody is going to object, so expect it to be changed quickly.
Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
 
dimondan
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Apr 18, 2005 9:54 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 11:32 am

I just did a ground school on ETOPS. Lets say that you took off from Washington Dulles. You get over the Atlantic going to Paris. You then have a engine failure. You then have a map that charts time that the aircraft is certified to fly single engine. The Boeing 777 is certified for 120 minutes of flying time single engine. By the end of that 120 minutes, it needs to be landed. Now, being in the middle of the ocean, you have options. A map as part of your flight package contains lines on where the 120 min. limit is. If you are in the Keflavik only sector, you are forced to go to Keflavik. If you are in the Gender sector(west end of the Atlantic) then you are forced to go to Gander. If you are in the Shannon sector, you are forced to go there(east Atlantic). If 2 sectors are over lapping where you are, you have the option of choosing where to go. It usually is decided on weather at each airports or personal preferences.

Hope this isn't like drinking from a fire hose.
"Approaching V-1"
 
N160LH
Posts: 264
Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 5:28 pm

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 12:17 pm

Quoting ThaiA345 (Thread starter):
I know ETOPS means extended twin-engined jet operations

Nope... It means Extended-Range Twin-Engine Operational Performance Standards...

These are some of the MX steps that make up ETOPS MX program:

“1. Predeparture service check – An ETOPS service check to be performed prior to each ETOPS departure. Consists of normal transits check, oil consumption monitoring tasks, and any additional checks deemed necessary for ETOPS.
2. Oil consumption monitoring program – A monitoring program to identify engine and APU oil consumption rate for each flight leg for an ETOPS airplane, whether an ETOPS flight or not.
3. Engine condition monitoring program (ECM)- A program to (a) ensure that engines parameters are not exceeded and (b) to address problems before they cause degradation or shutdown. Use this in conjunction with the oil consumption monitoring overall engine health.
4. Propulsion system monitoring program – A program to monitor in-flight shutdown rates for the ETOPS airplanes and to ensure that action is taken to restore the engine and also to determine if the recurrence of the problem can be avoided or reduced in the future.
5. Resolution of discrepancies program – A program to ensure that proper and expedient corrective action is taken following an engine in-flight shutdown, an ETOPS significant system failure, and any adverse trends indicated by the oil consumption and/or engine condition monitoring programs. Check out the repaired system after maintenance to ensure the effectiveness of the corrective action before releasing the airplane for flight.
6. Maintenance of multiple, similar systems – A program to avoid doing maintenance on both units of a dual system such as engines, fuel lines, etc. at the same maintenance visit. Different crews can be used on the separate systems if the work must be preformed at one visit.
7. ETOPS part control program – A program to ensure that only ETOPS authorized parts (as identified in the CMP or other SB’s or AD’s) are used on an ETOPS airplane.
8. APU high altitude start program – a program to ensure adequate high altitude start capability for the auxiliary power unit. Usually done during the first 2 months of operation. The operator should establish a 95 percent or higher start rate during this period. This will ensure that the modifications and maintenance actions are adequate.
9. ETOPS training – All personnel involved with the ETOPS maintenance program must receive training on the philosophy of ETOPS and on the specific requirements, with emphasis on the differences from the normal operation.
10. Identify ETOPS significant systems – This is a list of system, created by the operator for his specific operation, which identifies those systems that are directly related to ETOPS operation. These are the systems of concern in the other supplemental activities” (Kinnison, 2004).

Quoting ThaiA345 (Thread starter):
Are Etops certified per type of aircraft from the manufacturer or does each respective airline have to gain somesort of certification?



Quoting Beech19 (Reply 1):
They don't just come with it. Although i beleive the 777 was ETOP's certified from the factory... anyone verify that?

The 777 is the only aircraft to ever be certified straight from the manufacturer...


-160
"I do alright up in the air, its down on the ground that I tend to mess up..."
 
Max Q
Posts: 8007
Joined: Wed May 09, 2001 12:40 pm

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 1:27 pm

We used to fly nonstop from EWR to ANC on the 752.

Part of the route was ETOPS over Canada due to distance from a suitable divert airport.
The best contribution to safety is a competent Pilot.


GGg
 
trex8
Posts: 5385
Joined: Sat Nov 02, 2002 9:04 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 1:57 pm

Quoting N160LH (Reply 25):
The 777 is the only aircraft to ever be certified straight from the manufacturer...

It was the first but it certainly isn't the only one now.
 
GlobalVillage
Posts: 25
Joined: Mon Oct 30, 2006 5:36 pm

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 2:16 pm

Quoting Ikramerica (Reply 23):
Airbus can't sell the 350XWB while talking out of the other side of it's mouth about the lack of safety of twins...

I didn't mean that twins aren't as safe as 4 engined aircraft. What I meant was that 4 engined aircraft aren't regulated by ETOPS but they will be by LROPS.
 
ikramerica
Posts: 15057
Joined: Mon May 23, 2005 9:33 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 7:53 pm

Quoting Dimondan (Reply 24):
The Boeing 777 is certified for 120 minutes of flying time single engine.

The 777 is certified at 207 minutes. The 737NG, 757, 767, 320 and 330 series are currently certified at 180 minutes (not sure about 300/310 and certain 737NG and 321 models).
Of all the things to worry about... the Wookie has no pants.
 
manu
Posts: 265
Joined: Sat Dec 11, 2004 1:22 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 10:26 pm

Quoting Ikramerica (Reply 29):
The 777 is certified at 207 minutes.

Do you (or anyone else) know what the LAX->AKL 777 NZ 01 flight operates under? ETOPS 207 or 180?
 
Vref5
Posts: 187
Joined: Tue Dec 13, 2005 2:55 pm

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 10:49 pm

Quoting Ikramerica (Reply 29):
The 777 is certified at 207 minutes. The 737NG, 757, 767, 320 and 330 series are currently certified at 180 minutes (not sure about 300/310 and certain 737NG and 321 models).

Keep in mind that this is also airline specific, partly because ETOPS also takes into account the rate of airline-specific incidents for continued participation for a certain ETOPS level.

A major operator runs their 777 with a 180 minute ETOPS for the transatlantic routes (no real need for a greater number) and 777 with 207 minute ETOPS for transpacific flying, and also adopted quite a few of the ETOPS provisions for the 744s.
 
wingnut767
Posts: 762
Joined: Wed Nov 22, 2006 7:50 am

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 11:13 pm

Quoting Beech19 (Reply 1):
Its the amount of time a twin engine aircraft is certified to fly on one engine. Its for overwater operations, not from a specific airport.



Quoting Beech19 (Reply 6):
Good point. I was curious what the exact wording actually was. Africa is probably the only place where this would be an issue over land i would think... Sahara Desert area mostly?



Quoting SP90 (Reply 15):
The ETOPS portion of the flight starts as soon as one engine is shutdown right? Let say I have to shutdown one engine after flying for 5 hours, now I have <180 minutes (or <138 or <120 depending on the certification) to reach the nearest suitable landing strip. How is that ETOPS time counted? Does the time count from when the in-flight shutdown occured until the plane is on final or wheels touch down or come to a complete stop on the ground?



Quoting Ikramerica (Reply 23):
I just did a ground school on ETOPS. Lets say that you took off from Washington Dulles. You get over the Atlantic going to Paris. You then have a engine failure. You then have a map that charts time that the aircraft is certified to fly single engine. The Boeing 777 is certified for 120 minutes of flying time single engine. By the end of that 120 minutes, it needs to be landed. Now, being in the middle of the ocean, you have options. A map as part of your flight package contains lines on where the 120 min. limit is. If you are in the Keflavik only sector, you are forced to go to Keflavik. If you are in the Gender sector(west end of the Atlantic) then you are forced to go to Gander. If you are in the Shannon sector, you are forced to go there(east Atlantic). If 2 sectors are over lapping where you are, you have the option of choosing where to go. It usually is decided on weather at each airports or personal preferences.

These are all wrong. A few posts have it right. You always have to have your flight path within your maximum ETOPS distance. The Aircraft ALWAYS has to be within the limit. ETOPS 120 means that the Aircraft flight plan must always keep it within 120 minutes on one engine cruise speed to a suitable landing airport.

On a flight from New York to London with the 120 limit the flight plan will keep them within 120 minutes of one engine cruise speed of Bangor, Goose Bay, Iceland and so on.
Yakum purkan min shmaya
 
ltbewr
Posts: 14574
Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2004 1:24 pm

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sat Dec 09, 2006 11:33 pm

If I am correct, ETOPS aircraft may have to take slightly different and slightly longer routes determined from flight to flight to bring them closer within the time limits of diversion airports depending on prevaling wind speeds and direction, if severe weather conditions and when diversion airports may be open.
I believe that with the first TWA ETOPS a/c's in transatlantic service they had to take a slightly more northerly route to be closer to Iceland in case of diversions due to the limits under ETOPS then.
If I am correct, there has been a couple of 777's with engine problems in recent years that required shut downs in one engine while in flight from Asia to North America where they ended up in Yellowknife, NT Canada for diversion reasons.
 
N160LH
Posts: 264
Joined: Tue Aug 10, 2004 5:28 pm

RE: Etops - What Is It Actually About?

Sun Dec 10, 2006 5:30 am

Quoting Trex8 (Reply 27):
It was the first but it certainly isn't the only one now.

Which other airliner did you have in mind..?

-160
"I do alright up in the air, its down on the ground that I tend to mess up..."

Popular Searches On Airliners.net

Top Photos of Last:   24 Hours  •  48 Hours  •  7 Days  •  30 Days  •  180 Days  •  365 Days  •  All Time

Military Aircraft Every type from fighters to helicopters from air forces around the globe

Classic Airliners Props and jets from the good old days

Flight Decks Views from inside the cockpit

Aircraft Cabins Passenger cabin shots showing seat arrangements as well as cargo aircraft interior

Cargo Aircraft Pictures of great freighter aircraft

Government Aircraft Aircraft flying government officials

Helicopters Our large helicopter section. Both military and civil versions

Blimps / Airships Everything from the Goodyear blimp to the Zeppelin

Night Photos Beautiful shots taken while the sun is below the horizon

Accidents Accident, incident and crash related photos

Air to Air Photos taken by airborne photographers of airborne aircraft

Special Paint Schemes Aircraft painted in beautiful and original liveries

Airport Overviews Airport overviews from the air or ground

Tails and Winglets Tail and Winglet closeups with beautiful airline logos