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alaska737
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FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sat Dec 08, 2007 8:12 am

For all you pilots, students, wanna-be's or whatever else its time for some FAR/AIM trivia, this can go onto A/FD and chart trivia also. Feel free to answer any questions and after one has been answered correctly you can ask another. Im not going to keep score but if someone wants to go right ahead. I'm not sure what forum this should be in but whatever if its a big deal someone can move it.

Good Luck and please double check your facts if your asking a question!


I will start off with a few that you can have fun with

1. How far below a cloud must a VFR pilot be if he/she is in class G Airspace at 5,001 ft?

2. Your flying along and see a downed plane with a yellow cross on it, what does this mean?

3. Your flying VFR in Alaska over a 17,000' mountain at 18,100', what airspace are you in?

4. Is radio communication required in a class B VFR corridor?

5. Speeking METAR, "BR " is defined as what? (What weather requirement must be met to have BR in a METAR)

Have fun with these, I have some other crazy ones if these prove to be easy for some? Make your questions as hard as you can!
 
Longhornmaniac
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sat Dec 08, 2007 8:32 am

Good topic!!!!

Let's see how much I remember. (probably not much)

The sad part is, I just finished ground school.

1. 500 ft?
2. haven't a clue
3. Class G if I'm not mistaken
4. No
5. Mist

Cheers,
Cameron
Cheers,
Cameron
 
jgarrido
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sat Dec 08, 2007 8:42 am

Does anyone else remember #5 as "barely raining"?
 
SUPRAZACHAIR
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sat Dec 08, 2007 10:55 am

1. 500ft
2. Survivors require medical assistance
3. Class G
4. Nope
5. C'mon now, BR = Baby Rain (i.e. mist)...

Speaking of metars... what would SHRAGS be defined as in a metar?
 
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tb727
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sat Dec 08, 2007 4:58 pm



Quoting Alaska737 (Thread starter):

3. Your flying VFR in Alaska over a 17,000' mountain at 18,100', what airspace are you in?

Class A  Wink Nice one.
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futurecaptain
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sat Dec 08, 2007 5:15 pm

Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 3):
Speaking of metars... what would SHRAGS be defined as in a metar?

That's got me stumped for now, I'm trying to use my books and not the internet.

Anyway...from part 91.

1. Unless you are wearing a parachute you may not exceed banks of what degrees and nose up or nose down of what degrees?

2. What minimum weather conditions must be met to shoot an instrument approach?

3. What are the takeoff minimums for a flight conducted under part 91?

4. When are passengers required to use supplemental oxygen?

[Edited 2007-12-08 09:24:40]
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alaska737
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sat Dec 08, 2007 6:47 pm



Quoting Alaska737 (Thread starter):
1. How far below a cloud must a VFR pilot be if he/she is in class G Airspace at 5,001 ft?

2. Your flying along and see a downed plane with a yellow cross on it, what does this mean?

3. Your flying VFR in Alaska over a 17,000' mountain at 18,100', what airspace are you in?

4. Is radio communication required in a class B VFR corridor?

5. Speeking METAR, "BR " is defined as what? (What weather requirement must be met to have BR in a METAR)

here are some answers...
1. 500'
2. The crash has been identified and reported
3. Class G airspace, since unless otherwise depicted on charts, class E airspace starts at 1,200' AGL
4. No
5. Mist

to add on to number 5, how is mist defined?
 
alaska737
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sat Dec 08, 2007 6:57 pm



Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 3):
SHRAGS

wouldnt it just be showers rain and small hail?

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 5):
When are passengers required to use supplemental oxygen?

Never! they just have to be supplied with it above 15,000 feet MSL

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 5):
1. Unless you are wearing a parachute you may not exceed banks of what degrees and nose up or nose down of what degrees?

30 degrees pitch and 60 degrees bank if im not mistaken
 
Mir
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sat Dec 08, 2007 7:09 pm

Quoting Alaska737 (Thread starter):
4. Is radio communication required in a class B VFR corridor?

No, but you must have a Mode C transponder.

Quoting Alaska737 (Thread starter):
(What weather requirement must be met to have BR in a METAR)

Mist with visibility less than 6 miles but 5/8 mile or greater.

Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 3):
Speaking of metars... what would SHRAGS be defined as in a metar?

Rain showers and small hail.

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 5):
1. Unless you are wearing a parachute you may not exceed banks of what degrees and nose up or nose down of what degrees?

60 degrees of bank, 30 degrees of pitch.

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 5):
2. What minimum weather conditions must be met to shoot an instrument approach?

Flight visibility at or above what is listed on the approach plate.

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 5):
3. What are the takeoff minimums for a flight conducted under part 91?

None.

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 5):
4. When are passengers required to use supplemental oxygen?

Never.

-Mir

[Edited 2007-12-08 11:10:52]
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KELPkid
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sat Dec 08, 2007 7:22 pm



Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 5):
2. What minimum weather conditions must be met to shoot an instrument approach?

The weather must be IMC at the FAF (Final Approach Fix). Otherwise, it's a simulated approach (provided you are wearing a view-limiting device...)  Wink

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 5):
3. What are the takeoff minimums for a flight conducted under part 91?

That's a loaded one  Wink If the PIC is instrument rated and taking off on an instrument flight plan, a zero/zero takeoff is legal (but it definitely ain't smart or prudent...)  Smile Otherwise, it's the visibility specified for the class of airspace, unless you have obtained a special VFR clearance..
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KELPkid
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sat Dec 08, 2007 7:25 pm



Quoting Mir (Reply 8):
Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 5):
2. What minimum weather conditions must be met to shoot an instrument approach?

Flight visibility at or above what is listed on the approach plate.

 no  Uner part 91, you can attempt any approach, however if you do not have the runway environment in sight at DH or the MAP, you have to go missed Big grin
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Mir
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sat Dec 08, 2007 7:27 pm

A chart question now:

In the chart below, what are the various airspaces above Ferney (just off the 109 radial from the VOR), and where do they start/end?



-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
Mir
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sat Dec 08, 2007 7:32 pm

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 10):
Uner part 91, you can attempt any approach, however if you do not have the runway environment in sight at DH or the MAP, you have to go missed

You are right about the attempt of the approach (my bad on that), but there are two more elements that you're missing that you need to continue beyond DA/DH or MAP under Part 91. Required flight visibility is one of them. What is the other?

EDIT: And I should have said continue below DA/DH or MDA, not beyond MAP, since MAP has nothing to do with minimums.

-Mir

[Edited 2007-12-08 11:43:16]
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KELPkid
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sat Dec 08, 2007 7:32 pm



Quoting Mir (Reply 11):
In the chart below, what are the various airspaces above Ferney (just off the 109 radial from the VOR), and where do they start/end?

Class G-Surface to 699' AGL

Class E-700' AGL to 17,999' MSL

Class A-FL180 to FL600

Class E-above Class A until you run out of atmosphere  Wow!
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KELPkid
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sat Dec 08, 2007 7:39 pm



Quoting Mir (Reply 12):
Required flight visibility is one of them. What is the other?

You have to be able to descend to land from the aircraft's current position?
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Mir
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sat Dec 08, 2007 7:46 pm



Quoting KELPkid (Reply 14):
You have to be able to descend to land from the aircraft's current position?

Almost....

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
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tb727
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sat Dec 08, 2007 10:00 pm



Quoting Mir (Reply 15):

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 14):
You have to be able to descend to land from the aircraft's current position?

Almost....

Land from current position using normal manuevers with normal decent rates.

Have visual reference with the intended landing runway like the markings, lights or VASI etc.
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DeltaRules
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 4:52 am



Quoting Jgarrido (Reply 2):
Does anyone else remember #5 as "barely raining"?

I was taught to remember BR as "Baby Rain" for mist.
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futurecaptain
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 5:00 am

Off work now, got my FAR/AIM, I can try to stump KELPkid who got my trick questions.Alaska737, very good. Mir... good try.  Smile

1. Who are you supposed to report UFO sightings to?

2. What does the phrase "minimum fuel" mean to an air traffic controller? Is it an emergency?

3. Who must you surrender your license to when asked?

4. Who has right of way over Air Force One?


It's late, that's all I can come up with.
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Mir
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 5:25 am



Quoting DeltaRules (Reply 17):
I was taught to remember BR as "Baby Rain" for mist.

I just remember the French word for mist: BRume

Quoting Tb727 (Reply 16):
Land from current position using normal manuevers with normal decent rates.

That's the kicker!  Smile


In the following approach plate, you go missed and proceed to the published hold. What entry are you required to fly?

http://map.aeroplanner.com/plates/FaaPlates_pdfs/00651IL16.PDF

What are the various means of accomplishing a VOR check, and what are the allowable errors for each?

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
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asuflyer05
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 5:47 am

Talk to me about the janitrol heater.
 
futurecaptain
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 6:03 am



Quoting Mir (Reply 19):
In the following approach plate, you go missed and proceed to the published hold. What entry are you required to fly?

Hold entries are only suggested and not "required" or mandatory. But I would fly a direct entry.

Quoting Mir (Reply 19):
What are the various means of accomplishing a VOR check, and what are the allowable errors for each?

Airborne: +/- 6
Ground: +/- 4
VOT: +/- 4
Dual: Within 4 degrees of each other.

{crosses fingers with answering instrument questions}
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Mir
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 6:35 am



Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 21):
Airborne: +/- 6
Ground: +/- 4
VOT: +/- 4
Dual: Within 4 degrees of each other.

A little more specific on the airborne and ground ones - where can you do them?

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 21):
Hold entries are only suggested and not "required" or mandatory. But I would fly a direct entry.

Correct, though according to the figure in the AIM, teardrop would be the recommended entry, which I'd probably agree with. Entering direct from that angle would leave you quite close to the inbound course at the end of the turn (unless you made the turn at less than standard rate), and you'd likely end up overshooting the inbound when you turned around.


Another question dealing with that same approach plate: what does the fact that the Carmel VOR frequency is underlined mean?

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
futurecaptain
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 6:53 am



Quoting Mir (Reply 22):
teardrop would be the recommended entry

Duh. Hope my instructor doesn't read that. I just drew it out and see the teardrop. I can rattle off entries when I see a DG because I learned an easy way to do it with a DG in front of you.

Quoting Mir (Reply 22):
what does the fact that the Carmel VOR frequency is underlined mean?

I believe that means you can get voice over that frequency from an FSS or such.


Now, are you having trouble with my second batch of questions? I don't see any answers.  Wink
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alaska737
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 6:54 am



Quoting Mir (Reply 22):
Another question dealing with that same approach plate: what does the fact that the Carmel VOR frequency is underlined mean?

No voice

ok so heres a scenario, a CRJ is bording and as the first passenger boards he slips on the icy stairs and falls on his face. the lady behind him drops her cigar on him and burns him. the flight is cancelled and the man goes home, 6 days later he goes to a hospital and is forced to stay at the hospital for 24 hours exactly....turns out all he had was a broken nose and 3rd degree burns on 6% of his body....is this an incident or accident and why?
 
KELPkid
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 7:00 am



Quoting Mir (Reply 22):
A little more specific on the airborne and ground ones - where can you do them?

Airborne VOR checkpoints are published in the FAA's Airport/Facility Directory, as are ground-based VOT signals.

Quoting Mir (Reply 22):
Another question dealing with that same approach plate: what does the fact that the Carmel VOR frequency is underlined mean?

No voice transmission available on the VOR frequency.
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KELPkid
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 7:04 am

Okay, here's one for you folks...

Assume an aircraft certified under CAR 3 or FAR Part 23.

What maintenance may an aircraft owner (not an FAA certified A&P or IA) perform on their aircraft themselves, and which section of the FAR's are these maintenance items specifically spelled out?  eyebrow 
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Mir
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 7:12 am



Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 18):
1. Who are you supposed to report UFO sightings to?

Art Bell?

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 18):
2. What does the phrase "minimum fuel" mean to an air traffic controller? Is it an emergency?

It is not an emergency, it means that the pilot cannot accept any undue delay.

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 18):
3. Who must you surrender your license to when asked?

Can't surrender something you don't have (at least in the US anyway).  Wink

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 18):
4. Who has right of way over Air Force One?

An aircraft in distress, followed by lifeguard flights (and airevac/medevac flights when they request it).

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
KELPkid
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 7:28 am



Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 18):
1. Who are you supposed to report UFO sightings to?

The "X" Files dudes? United States Air Force? NASA?  Big grin

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 18):
2. What does the phrase "minimum fuel" mean to an air traffic controller? Is it an emergency?

The flight is unable to accept any further delays due to the fuel state on board the aircraft. It is not an emergency.

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 18):
3. Who must you surrender your license to when asked?

The administrator of the FAA.

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 18):
4. Who has right of way over Air Force One?

I think Mir got that one...good one, because I would have said "no one."  Wink

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 18):
I can try to stump KELPkid who got my trick questions

I have a feeling you succeeded here, I'm working from memory  Smile I should have been a lawyer, I've got a good mind for this sort of thing...
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Mir
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 7:31 am



Quoting KELPkid (Reply 25):
Airborne VOR checkpoints are published in the FAA's Airport/Facility Directory, as are ground-based VOT signals.

You're missing one in the air and one on the ground.

Quoting Alaska737 (Reply 24):
a CRJ is bording and as the first passenger boards he slips on the icy stairs and falls on his face. the lady behind him drops her cigar on him and burns him. the flight is cancelled and the man goes home, 6 days later he goes to a hospital and is forced to stay at the hospital for 24 hours exactly....turns out all he had was a broken nose and 3rd degree burns on 6% of his body....is this an incident or accident and why?

Incident, because it's not associated with the operation of the aircraft.

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 26):
What maintenance may an aircraft owner (not an FAA certified A&P or IA) perform on their aircraft themselves, and which section of the FAR's are these maintenance items specifically spelled out?

Preventitive maintenance, as described in Part 43.

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 23):
I believe that means you can get voice over that frequency from an FSS or such.

As others have said, it means you CAN'T get voice on that frequency (but that doesn't mean it can't have a HIWAS or ATIS/ASOS recording on it).

---------------------------

What does a MOCA guarantee?

When must your landing light be on?

How much training for the instrument rating must actually be done under IFR?

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
Maverick623
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 8:42 am



Quoting Mir (Reply 29):
When must your landing light be on?

IIRC, at night, within 10 miles of an airport, but only if the aircraft is operated for commercial purposes. (ie, charter flights, or rented aircraft).

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 18):
4. Who has right of way over Air Force One?



Quoting Mir (Reply 27):
An aircraft in distress, followed by lifeguard flights (and airevac/medevac flights when they request it).

You missed a few lol.

In order of importance: Aircraft in distress, lifeguard flights, balloons, gliders, and airships.
"PHX is Phoenix, PDX is the other city" -777Way
 
SUPRAZACHAIR
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 8:45 am



Quoting Tb727 (Reply 4):
Class A Nice one.

Class G w/in 1200ft AGL of the surface...  Wink

Quoting Mir (Reply 29):
What does a MOCA guarantee?

MOCA = 2000ft Mountainous, 1000ft Non-mountainous, VOR signal coverage w/in 22nm

Quoting Mir (Reply 29):
When must your landing light be on?

I don't think there's any requirement for turning it on, only that its required for night ops for hire.

Quoting Mir (Reply 29):
How much training for the instrument rating must actually be done under IFR?

You aren't required to have any actual, it can all be simulated (ask the guys that do the 30-day courses in Arizona).
 
alaska737
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 9:34 am



Quoting Mir (Reply 29):
Incident, because it's not associated with the operation of the aircraft.

sure about that? he did slip on the aircraft stairs as he boarded...
 
Maverick623
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 10:16 am



Quoting Alaska737 (Reply 32):
sure about that? he did slip on the aircraft stairs as he boarded...

Mir is correct, but for the wrong reason. Anything that affects the operation of the airplane between the first person boarded (yes, flight crew counts) and last person disembarked is classified as either accident or incident.

The key here is the definition of serious injury (which is the determining factor here): according to the NTSB, in order to qualify as Serious the injury must require hospitalization within 7 days, with a hospitalization time of 48 hours. In this case, only 24 hours of care does not meet the requirement for "serious" injury; it is an incident in the eyes of the NTSB.
"PHX is Phoenix, PDX is the other city" -777Way
 
futurecaptain
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 11:15 am



Quoting Mir (Reply 27):
Art Bell?



Quoting KELPkid (Reply 28):
The "X" Files dudes? United States Air Force? NASA?

Ya, I looked in an obscure section of the AIM for this one. It's actually the National Institute for Discovery Sciences. Or if you have concern that local property is in danger, contact local law enforcement.

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 28):
The administrator of the FAA.

And anyone else?

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 28):
good one, because I would have said "no one."

Lots of people do, I used to think so. The POTUS isn't that important though.  Silly
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KAUSpilot
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 11:37 am



Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 31):
Class G w/in 1200ft AGL of the surface...

Actually in this case it would be Class G from the surface to 18,499 unless otherwise depicted on a chart. Reference AIM 3-2-6.7

It specifically references Class E airspace as excluding that airspace lower than 1500 AGL unless designated at a lower altitude. Areas with terrain above 17,000 would likely be remote enough not to have Class E designated as lower (usually 1200 or . The same should apply to class A airspace.

Also reference the Jeppesen Instrument Commercial Manual page 3-25

"Most Class G airspace terminates at the base of Class E airspace at 700 or 1200 feet agl, or at 14,500 feet MSL. An exception to this rule occurs when 14,500 feet MSL is lower than 1,500 feet AGL. In this situation, Class G airspace continues up to 1,500 feet above the surface."

In other words, unless the terrain at 17,000 ft fell inside an area depicted on a section with a faded blue or faded magenta border (or a staggered blue line depicted some other class E floor), controlled airspace wouldn't begin until 1500 AGL.


How about this one..... Your flying into DEN at 11,000 ft and are inside it's Class B airspace. How fast can you go?
 
Mir
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 3:00 pm



Quoting Alaska737 (Reply 32):
sure about that? he did slip on the aircraft stairs as he boarded...

Yeah, I thought about that, but as I read it having a cigar dropped on you (the burns are the only reason that it would be an accident) doesn't really count as operation of the aircraft. I could be wrong though - they don't really define what operation of the aircraft means.

Quoting KAUSpilot (Reply 35):
Your flying into DEN at 11,000 ft and are inside it's Class B airspace. How fast can you go?

Mach .9999999~

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 34):
Quoting KELPkid (Reply 28):
The administrator of the FAA.

And anyone else?

61.51(I)(1) says that you have to PRESENT your certificate (not a license) to an agent of the Administrator, TSA, NTSB, or law enforcement should any of them ask to see it. You do not have to surrender it.

Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 31):
MOCA = 2000ft Mountainous, 1000ft Non-mountainous, VOR signal coverage w/in 22nm

 thumbsup  How would you find out whether a certain part of the country is moutainous or non-mountainous?

Quoting Maverick623 (Reply 30):
IIRC, at night, within 10 miles of an airport, but only if the aircraft is operated for commercial purposes. (ie, charter flights, or rented aircraft).

 thumbsdown 

Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 31):
I don't think there's any requirement for turning it on, only that its required for night ops for hire.

 thumbsup 

Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 31):
You aren't required to have any actual, it can all be simulated (ask the guys that do the 30-day courses in Arizona).

 thumbsdown  You're confusing IFR with IMC. They're not the same.

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
KELPkid
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 3:14 pm



Quoting Mir (Reply 29):
What does a MOCA guarantee?

(Going by memory here...) Terrain clearance + 1000 ft. with adequate navigation signal reception within 22 NM of the navaid.

Quoting Mir (Reply 29):
When must your landing light be on?

Under part 91, when you want it on  Smile

Quoting Mir (Reply 29):
How much training for the instrument rating must actually be done under IFR?

None. However the trainee must be using a view limiting device  Wink
Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
 
AF340
Posts: 2267
Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2007 7:57 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 3:34 pm



Quoting Alaska737 (Thread starter):
3. Your flying VFR in Alaska over a 17,000' mountain at 18,100', what airspace are you in?

US Domestic? In Canada that would be CDA since it's above 18,000 ASL. Not sure what letter it would be though...




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futurecaptain
Posts: 1918
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 5:10 pm



Quoting Mir (Reply 29):
How much training for the instrument rating must actually be done under IFR?



Quoting Mir (Reply 36):
You're confusing IFR with IMC. They're not the same.

Ooh, interesting question. Now I'm confused. One hand wants to say all the flight time. The other wants to say only the two XC's.
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MattRB
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 5:32 pm



Quoting AF340 (Reply 38):
Not sure what letter it would be though...

You'd be in the Southern Control Area of the CDA. All air traffic is controlled in this area above FL180. I would think it would be Class A in this instance.
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bhmbaglock
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 5:57 pm



Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 18):
4. Who has right of way over Air Force One?



Quoting Mir (Reply 27):
An aircraft in distress, followed by lifeguard flights (and airevac/medevac flights when they request it).

What about unpowered a/c, i.e. gliders, balloons, parachutes. I believe they would also have the right of way. Of course the odds of being in the same airspace legally are minimal.
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N231YE
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 7:38 pm

Definately a sweet thread!
 
AF340
Posts: 2267
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 7:45 pm

A bit of an easier question:

In Canada what freq. should you monitor when in uncontrolled airspace. Think of your PSTAR!




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Mir
Posts: 19491
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 8:00 pm



Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 39):
One hand wants to say all the flight time. The other wants to say only the two XC's.

One hand is closer than the other. But both are wrong.  Smile

-Mir
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alaska737
Topic Author
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Sun Dec 09, 2007 8:43 pm



Quoting Maverick623 (Reply 33):
The key here is the definition of serious injury (which is the determining factor here): according to the NTSB, in order to qualify as Serious the injury must require hospitalization within 7 days, with a hospitalization time of 48 hours. In this case, only 24 hours of care does not meet the requirement for "serious" injury; it is an incident in the eyes of the NTSB

the reason it is a serious injury is because the burns are 3rd degree and cover more than 5% or his body, and since this happend within the time of the first person boarding to the last person deplaning, it would be defined as an accident.
 
Maverick623
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Mon Dec 10, 2007 7:04 am



Quoting Alaska737 (Reply 45):
The reason it is a serious injury is because the burns are 3rd degree and cover more than 5% or his body,

I stand corrected... I actually found the 5% burn requirement after I posted, but was already late for work.  rotfl 
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Alias1024
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Mon Dec 10, 2007 7:46 am



Quoting Mir (Reply 44):
One hand is closer than the other. But both are wrong.

I think is only one XC which must be performed under instrument flight rules. The XC must be 250 nm distance flown on airways or under ATC routing, at least three different types of instrument approach must be flown, and an instrument approach must be flown at each airport on the XC. Of course, the syllabus for part 141 and 142 courses may include other IFR flights, which would then be required training as well.
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KELPkid
Posts: 5247
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Mon Dec 10, 2007 7:59 am



Quoting Alias1024 (Reply 47):
I think is only one XC which must be performed under instrument flight rules. The XC must be 250 nm distance flown on airways or under ATC routing, at least three different types of instrument approach must be flown, and an instrument approach must be flown at each airport on the XC. Of course, the syllabus for part 141 and 142 courses may include other IFR flights, which would then be required training as well.

*** SOAPBOX TIME ***
Any instructor who takes a student through the instrument rating with minimal working "in the system" is doing that student a real disservice, as learning to operate in the system is ~50% of the work involved in getting an instrument rating, IMHO...

Okay, back to our regularly scheduled thread, I kindly yield soapbox usage to other forum members  Wink
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SUPRAZACHAIR
Posts: 474
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2004 3:27 pm

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Mon Dec 10, 2007 8:52 am



Quoting Mir (Reply 36):
How would you find out whether a certain part of the country is moutainous or non-mountainous?

In the front of my Jepp's...  Wink

Quoting Mir (Reply 36):
You're confusing IFR with IMC. They're not the same.

I know this, but I thought you were asking about actual IMC... I do think I know what you're getting at though, but I'll hit it two ways:
1)You're required to have 40hours of IFR training
2) You can accomplish 30 of those hours in a FTD or Sim if they meet the req's of part 142, and only 20 hours if they don't meet those req's...

So either 40 or 20 or 10, depending on how you look at it. The x-country falls within the req's of the 40 hours of actual/simulated IFR. I will say that, technically, the only part of the Reg's that use the term "under IFR" is the reference to the 250nm x-country. My brain hurts now.

Quoting KAUSpilot (Reply 35):
How about this one..... Your flying into DEN at 11,000 ft and are inside it's Class B airspace. How fast can you go?

As fast as you can!

How many fuel pumps in a Piper Seminole?

What weather phenomena would trigger the issuance of SIGMET?

Are winds reported on ATIS magnetic or true?

Why do certificates printed via IACRA have to be be so damn big, seriously?

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