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graphic
Posts: 1293
Joined: Sat Nov 18, 2006 10:41 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Mon Dec 10, 2007 9:16 am



Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 49):
How many fuel pumps in a Piper Seminole?

What weather phenomena would trigger the issuance of SIGMET?

Are winds reported on ATIS magnetic or true?

Why do certificates printed via IACRA have to be be so damn big, seriously?

1. 4 - 2 electric and 2 - engine driven

2. Really shitty weather

3. True

4. IACRA?
Demand Media fails at life
 
jhooper
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Mon Dec 10, 2007 9:25 am

A procedure turn "barb" is posted on the approach plate. Is there more than one way to fly this type of course reversal? If so, how?
Last year 1,944 New Yorkers saw something and said something.
 
SUPRAZACHAIR
Posts: 474
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2004 3:27 pm

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Mon Dec 10, 2007 10:26 am



Quoting Graphic (Reply 50):
1. 4 - 2 electric and 2 - engine driven

You sure about that?

Quoting Jhooper (Reply 51):
A procedure turn "barb" is posted on the approach plate. Is there more than one way to fly this type of course reversal? If so, how?

Technically, there is an infinite number of ways to peform a procedure turn when only the barb is depicted. They're often depicted with a 45deg turn, and a 180 to intercept the final approach course. You can also use a teardrop. Though if you wanted to you could fly any way that gets you back to final approach course so long as you stay within the prescribed distance (generally 10nm) and in prescribed direction (the direction the barb is pointing).
 
Mir
Posts: 19491
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2004 3:55 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Mon Dec 10, 2007 12:37 pm



Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 49):
You're required to have 40hours of IFR training

No, you're required to have 40 hours of IMC training. They can either be simulated or actual (which is how the guys in Arizona pull it off - they just spend all their time under the hood). IFR does not equal IMC.

Quoting Alias1024 (Reply 47):
I think is only one XC which must be performed under instrument flight rules. The XC must be 250 nm distance flown on airways or under ATC routing, at least three different types of instrument approach must be flown, and an instrument approach must be flown at each airport on the XC.

 checkmark  That's the only time you actually have to be operating under IFR. Every single other flight you do can be VFR with you under the hood and your instructor telling you what to do and where to go.

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 48):
*** SOAPBOX TIME ***
Any instructor who takes a student through the instrument rating with minimal working "in the system" is doing that student a real disservice, as learning to operate in the system is ~50% of the work involved in getting an instrument rating, IMHO...

 checkmark 

Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 49):
How many fuel pumps in a Piper Seminole?

Don't fly the Seminole, so I couldn't tell you.

Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 49):
What weather phenomena would trigger the issuance of SIGMET?

Severe icing or severe/extreme/CAT tubulence (both not associated with thunderstorms)
Dust or sandstorms lowering visibility below 3 miles
Volcanic ash.

Hawaii and Alaska also give out SIGMETs for convective activity.

Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 49):
Are winds reported on ATIS magnetic or true?

True.

Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 49):
Why do certificates printed via IACRA have to be be so damn big, seriously?

Yeah, that really is a pain in the ass.

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
KELPkid
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Mon Dec 10, 2007 4:09 pm

Here's a new one...

You are the (private) owner of a Cessna 206. A friend, who knows about you and your plane, offers you enough money to cover your expenses and a little bit of profit to fly himself and some company material from your aircraft's home base to a place that he needs to be (beyond 25 NM from the home base). Is this operation subject to part 135, and would you have to hold a commercial license to carry this operation out? Cite FAR's (and concepts!) as appropriate  Smile

Confession: I remember studying these scenarios in my commercial ground school, but I don't recall the answer to this specific one  Wink
Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
 
Mir
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Mon Dec 10, 2007 4:33 pm



Quoting KELPkid (Reply 54):
You are the (private) owner of a Cessna 206. A friend, who knows about you and your plane, offers you enough money to cover your expenses and a little bit of profit to fly himself and some company material from your aircraft's home base to a place that he needs to be (beyond 25 NM from the home base). Is this operation subject to part 135, and would you have to hold a commercial license to carry this operation out? Cite FAR's (and concepts!) as appropriate

First of all, if you are going to pay less than your pro rata share of flight expenses, you need to have a commercial certificate. That's pretty much set in stone. The rest of it gets into the wonders of AC120-12A, and that's not a very straight-forward place to be:

1) If the operation is defined as common carriage, then it must be conducted under Part 121 or 135.
2) Four elements that go into determining common carriage are a) holding out of a willingness to b) transport property c) from place to place d) for compensation.
3) A reputation to serve all counts as holding out, even if you as the pilot are not approaching anybody offering services (this is what would come most into play here - your friend knew that you were a pilot, and offered you compensation for services - whether that is holding out or not depends on whether you would do the same for anyone, and is VERY vague. There is also the issue of whether your friend is acting as your friend or as the agent of his company.)

In short, there is nothing that I know of in the FARs that would prohibit you getting paid for the flight, assuming you did have a CPL. But it's very borderline, and even though the AC is non-regulatory, I've heard of people getting hit with 91.13 for less borderline stuff than this. The part about company material is really getting into shady territory, and that's probably where the FAA lawyers would jump on you. I wouldn't do it.

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
Shawn Patrick
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Mon Dec 10, 2007 4:40 pm



Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 49):
Are winds reported on ATIS magnetic or true?

I'm curious about the source for those who said True. I found a source in the AIM that says Magnetic (4-1-13 B). No doubt it will be listed as true or magnetic depending on where you look.

Gotta love splitting hairs
 
Mir
Posts: 19491
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2004 3:55 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Mon Dec 10, 2007 7:20 pm



Quoting Shawn Patrick (Reply 56):
I'm curious about the source for those who said True. I found a source in the AIM that says Magnetic (4-1-13 B).

I was incorrect - it is magnetic. That makes sense, since it's what the runways are numbered by.

My source was the Aviation Weather Services book (AC00-45E), under the METAR section. Apparently, METAR winds are true, but ATIS winds are not. I'm not quite sure why that is - very confusing.

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
Alias1024
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Mon Dec 10, 2007 7:33 pm



Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 49):
How many fuel pumps in a Piper Seminole?

Five. 2 engine driven, 2 electric aux. pumps, and one pump for the janitrol fire hazard...I mean heater.
It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems with just potatoes.
 
KELPkid
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Mon Dec 10, 2007 7:53 pm



Quoting Alias1024 (Reply 58):
and one pump for the janitrol fire hazard...I mean heater.

 rotfl 
Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
 
alaska737
Topic Author
Posts: 867
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Mon Dec 10, 2007 8:42 pm

A balloon is overtaking a Piper J-3 cub, who has the right of way?
 
AF340
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Mon Dec 10, 2007 9:35 pm



Quoting KELPkid (Reply 54):

I've always wondered if you could accept the money for something else. Like he wants to pay you so you give him, for example, a pen and you claim that he is paying you for the pen not the flight. Is that illegal?



AF340 wave 
 
SUPRAZACHAIR
Posts: 474
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Mon Dec 10, 2007 9:55 pm

Quoting Alias1024 (Reply 58):

Five. 2 engine driven, 2 electric aux. pumps, and one pump for the janitrol fire hazard...I mean heater.

Bingo, whirling vortex of flame FTW! Don't forget to open your intake vent or it'll be a long cold flight when that breaker pops.

Quoting Mir (Reply 53):
No, you're required to have 40 hours of IMC training. They can either be simulated or actual (which is how the guys in Arizona pull it off - they just spend all their time under the hood). IFR does not equal IMC.

I think you're confused. IMC= instrument meteorological conditions, i.e. <3SM cig <1000ft. You are not required to have 40 hours of IMC, as I have had my Instrument for some time and I don't have 40 hours in IMC. IFR is simply the rules governing instrument flight, it does not require you to be in IMC, only that the flight is flown under the rules governing instrument flight (whether that be simulated or not).

I think we're just getting stuck on a difference in phraseology. I would not say "IMC training", I'd say instrument training (which is broken into actual [in IMC] and simulated [hood]). IMC really only refers to wx conditons.

Quoting Mir (Reply 53):
Quoting Alias1024 (Reply 47):
I think is only one XC which must be performed under instrument flight rules. The XC must be 250 nm distance flown on airways or under ATC routing, at least three different types of instrument approach must be flown, and an instrument approach must be flown at each airport on the XC.

That's the only time you actually have to be operating under IFR. Every single other flight you do can be VFR with you under the hood and your instructor telling you what to do and where to go.

That is the only time you have to operate under IFR, but your instrument x-country does not have to be in the clouds at all, it can be 10SM and CLR. Mine was, but thats the PacNW for ya.

Quoting Alaska737 (Reply 60):
A balloon is overtaking a Piper J-3 cub, who has the right of way?

The Cub

[Edited 2007-12-10 13:59:40]
 
Mir
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Tue Dec 11, 2007 12:48 am



Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 62):
I think you're confused. IMC= instrument meteorological conditions, i.e. <3SM cig <1000ft. You are not required to have 40 hours of IMC, as I have had my Instrument for some time and I don't have 40 hours in IMC.

You do have 40 hours in IMC. Simulated IMC, perhaps, but IMC nonetheless. The regs do use the term "instrument training".

Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 62):
IFR is simply the rules governing instrument flight, it does not require you to be in IMC, only that the flight is flown under the rules governing instrument flight (whether that be simulated or not).

Exactly.

Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 62):
That is the only time you have to operate under IFR, but your instrument x-country does not have to be in the clouds at all, it can be 10SM and CLR. Mine was

So was mine, for the most part. We did manage to run into some clouds at 12,000ft though, and got about a half hour of actual.

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
Maverick623
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Tue Dec 11, 2007 7:08 am



Quoting Alaska737 (Reply 60):
A balloon is overtaking a Piper J-3 cub, who has the right of way?



Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 62):
The Cub

Wrong, it would be the balloon. The least maneuverable aircraft always has the right of way under normal operating conditions. Overtaking aircraft of the same category would yield right of way to the slower one, true, but they're in two different categories.
"PHX is Phoenix, PDX is the other city" -777Way
 
Alias1024
Posts: 2652
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2004 11:13 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Tue Dec 11, 2007 8:12 am



Quoting Maverick623 (Reply 64):
Wrong, it would be the balloon. The least maneuverable aircraft always has the right of way under normal operating conditions. Overtaking aircraft of the same category would yield right of way to the slower one, true, but they're in two different categories.

Sorry, but you are wrong. In an overtaking situation, the aircraft being overtaken has right of way. Aircraft category applies when aircraft are converging, not when one is being overtaken by another. It's 91.113 in case you want to look it up.
It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems with just potatoes.
 
Mir
Posts: 19491
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2004 3:55 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Tue Dec 11, 2007 1:09 pm



Quoting AF340 (Reply 61):
I've always wondered if you could accept the money for something else. Like he wants to pay you so you give him, for example, a pen and you claim that he is paying you for the pen not the flight. Is that illegal?

Would you risk your certificate on it?  Sad

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
bhmbaglock
Posts: 2489
Joined: Thu Jul 14, 2005 7:51 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Tue Dec 11, 2007 2:53 pm



Quoting Alias1024 (Reply 65):
Sorry, but you are wrong. In an overtaking situation, the aircraft being overtaken has right of way. Aircraft category applies when aircraft are converging, not when one is being overtaken by another. It's 91.113 in case you want to look it up.

and the balloon steers away how?

btw, from 91.113d:

Quote:
(1) A balloon has the right-of-way over any other category of aircraft;

Where are all of my respected members going?
 
FlyHoss
Posts: 534
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2005 12:20 pm

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Tue Dec 11, 2007 3:44 pm

Here's another METAR code. What is MIFG?

No, it's not fog in Michigan - which admittedly, was my first thought...
A little bit louder now, a lil bit louder now...
 
alaska737
Topic Author
Posts: 867
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Tue Dec 11, 2007 4:13 pm



Quoting FlyHoss (Reply 68):
What is MIFG

Shallow Fog???


Name the 4 types of airspace and give me an example of each.

True or false, the mode C veil will ALWAYS from the surface to 10,000 ft MSL reguardless of the class B airspace

What frequency are you as a pilot urged to be monitoring when your flying through a VFR corridor?

Quoting Alias1024 (Reply 65):
Quoting Maverick623 (Reply 64):
Wrong, it would be the balloon. The least maneuverable aircraft always has the right of way under normal operating conditions. Overtaking aircraft of the same category would yield right of way to the slower one, true, but they're in two different categories.

Sorry, but you are wrong. In an overtaking situation, the aircraft being overtaken has right of way. Aircraft category applies when aircraft are converging, not when one is being overtaken by another. It's 91.113 in case you want to look it up.

ok under my intrepration of 91.113 the cub has the right of way, if the two airplanes were converging then the balloon has it but its always the aircraft being overtaken.
 
futurecaptain
Posts: 1918
Joined: Sat Sep 09, 2006 1:54 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Tue Dec 11, 2007 4:31 pm



Quoting Alaska737 (Reply 69):
Name the 4 types of airspace and give me an example of each.

All I could remember off hand was controlled and uncontrolled. The other 2 types are special use airspace and other airspace.
AIM 3-1-4

Examples.
Controlled: Class A, B, C, D, and E airspace.
Uncontrolled: Class G airspace
Special Use: Prohibited areas, restriced areas, warning areas, MOA's, Alert areas, controlled firing areas, ect.
Other: Military training routes, TFR's, VFR routes, ect.

Quoting Alaska737 (Reply 69):
True or false, the mode C veil will ALWAYS from the surface to 10,000 ft MSL reguardless of the class B airspace

I am going to say false because you put the word always in the question.

Quoting Alaska737 (Reply 69):
What frequency are you as a pilot urged to be monitoring when your flying through a VFR corridor?

122.75
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Maverick623
Posts: 4722
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Tue Dec 11, 2007 4:32 pm



Quoting Alaska737 (Reply 69):
Name the 4 types of airspace and give me an example of each.

A - FL180 thru FL599

Quoting Alaska737 (Reply 69):
True or false, the mode C veil will ALWAYS from the surface to 10,000 ft MSL reguardless of the class B airspace

True

Quoting Alaska737 (Reply 69):
What frequency are you as a pilot urged to be monitoring when your flying through a VFR corridor?

The designated published advisory frequency. It's different for each corridor.
"PHX is Phoenix, PDX is the other city" -777Way
 
futurecaptain
Posts: 1918
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RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Tue Dec 11, 2007 5:04 pm

When flying IFR what malfunctions must be reported to ATC and what information should be included in the radio transmission?

What other performance issues must be reported when flying IFR?

Can you fly an aircraft with no transponder through class B airspace?

What must the PIC brief his/her passengers on before takeoff?
AirSO. ASpaceO. ASOnline. ASO.com ASO. ASO. ASO. ASO. ASO.
 
KELPkid
Posts: 5247
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2005 5:33 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Tue Dec 11, 2007 6:22 pm



Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 72):
When flying IFR what malfunctions must be reported to ATC and what information should be included in the radio transmission?

Any instrumentation malfunctions must be reported, and the instrument(s) malfunctioning. Good time to request no-gyro turns, too, if you suffer the most common instrument failure (vacuum system failure)  Wink

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 72):
What other performance issues must be reported when flying IFR?

(going from memory here...) Anticipated arrival more than 10 minutes behind flight plan schedule at any fix in the flight plan, speed changes +/- 15%.

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 72):
Can you fly an aircraft with no transponder through class B airspace?

Only with prior approval from the controlling facility.

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 72):
What must the PIC brief his/her passengers on before takeoff?

Proper use and operation of safety belts, exits, and other safety equipment (e.g. liferafts or parachutes, if applicable).  Smile
Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
 
Mir
Posts: 19491
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2004 3:55 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Tue Dec 11, 2007 6:26 pm



Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 72):
When flying IFR what malfunctions must be reported to ATC and what information should be included in the radio transmission?

Avionics failures. The report must include what has failed, how it will affect you, and what assistance you require from ATC.

Example: "N325WA has lost our ADF, unable to track NDBs or shoot approaches that require ADF, no further assistance required."

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 72):
What other performance issues must be reported when flying IFR?

None. The AIM says, however, that you should report either if you are unable to climb/descend at at least 500fpm, or if your true airspeed differs from the one you filed by more than 10 knots or 5%, whichever is greater, and if in a non-radar environment, whenever a previously submitted ETA is going to be off by more than 3 minutes. The part of the AIM that says you should do it is written in bold - that's about as close to regulatory as non-regulatory can get.  Wink

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 72):
Can you fly an aircraft with no transponder through class B airspace?

Yes, if you get ATC permission first (submit a request to the facility at least one hour before the flight).

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 72):
What must the PIC brief his/her passengers on before takeoff?

Smoking, seatbelt use, location and operation of exits, location of survival equipment, ditching and flotation equipment, use of oxygen. All this only applies if you're operating under Subpart F of Part 91, but it's still a good idea to go over all that (if you have it) if you're just doing a regular Part 91 flight.

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
FlyHoss
Posts: 534
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2005 12:20 pm

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Tue Dec 11, 2007 6:28 pm



Quoting Alaska737 (Reply 69):
Quoting FlyHoss (Reply 68):
What is MIFG

Shallow Fog???

Yes, Shallow Fog. I wasn't joking that my first thought (nearing the end of a "red-eye") was "fog in Michigan!? What do I care? We're landing in Texas."

So I referred to my handy METAR decoder ring (well, not actually, it was my METAR (code) card) to get the answer. The fog was thin and very low, just enough to make the landing flare sporting.
A little bit louder now, a lil bit louder now...
 
alaska737
Topic Author
Posts: 867
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 11:19 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Tue Dec 11, 2007 7:04 pm



Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 70):
Examples.
Controlled: Class A, B, C, D, and E airspace.
Uncontrolled: Class G airspace
Special Use: Prohibited areas, restriced areas, warning areas, MOA's, Alert areas, controlled firing areas, ect.
Other: Military training routes, TFR's, VFR routes, ect.

 checkmark 

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 70):
122.75

 checkmark 

Quoting Maverick623 (Reply 71):
True

 checkmark 
 
Alias1024
Posts: 2652
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2004 11:13 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Tue Dec 11, 2007 7:35 pm



Quoting BHMBAGLOCK (Reply 67):
and the balloon steers away how?

btw, from 91.113d:

Quote:
(1) A balloon has the right-of-way over any other category of aircraft;

 banghead 
Here is a full copy of 91.113:
(a) Inapplicability. This section does not apply to the operation of an aircraft on water.

(b) General. When weather conditions permit, regardless of whether an operation is conducted under instrument flight rules or visual flight rules, vigilance shall be maintained by each person operating an aircraft so as to see and avoid other aircraft. When a rule of this section gives another aircraft the right-of-way, the pilot shall give way to that aircraft and may not pass over, under, or ahead of it unless well clear.

(c) In distress. An aircraft in distress has the right-of-way over all other air traffic.

(d) Converging. When aircraft of the same category are converging at approximately the same altitude (except head-on, or nearly so), the aircraft to the other's right has the right-of-way. If the aircraft are of different categories—

(1) A balloon has the right-of-way over any other category of aircraft;

(2) A glider has the right-of-way over an airship, powered parachute, weight-shift-control aircraft, airplane, or rotorcraft.

(3) An airship has the right-of-way over a powered parachute, weight-shift-control aircraft, airplane, or rotorcraft.

However, an aircraft towing or refueling other aircraft has the right-of-way over all other engine-driven aircraft.

(e) Approaching head-on. When aircraft are approaching each other head-on, or nearly so, each pilot of each aircraft shall alter course to the right.

(f) Overtaking. Each aircraft that is being overtaken has the right-of-way and each pilot of an overtaking aircraft shall alter course to the right to pass well clear.

(g) Landing. Aircraft, while on final approach to land or while landing, have the right-of-way over other aircraft in flight or operating on the surface, except that they shall not take advantage of this rule to force an aircraft off the runway surface which has already landed and is attempting to make way for an aircraft on final approach. When two or more aircraft are approaching an airport for the purpose of landing, the aircraft at the lower altitude has the right-of-way, but it shall not take advantage of this rule to cut in front of another which is on final approach to land or to overtake that aircraft.

As you pointed out yourself, 91.113(d)(1) states that the baloon has right of way. However, section (d) of the regulation pertains to converging aircraft. That's why "Converging" is the first word after (d). The (1) next to what you quoted indicates that it is a subsection of (d). Now look at (f), which applies to overtaking aircraft. What does it say?

The balloon can steer out of the way by changing altitude.

Quoting Alaska737 (Reply 69):
ok under my intrepration of 91.113 the cub has the right of way, if the two airplanes were converging then the balloon has it but its always the aircraft being overtaken.

You are correct.
It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems with just potatoes.
 
KELPkid
Posts: 5247
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2005 5:33 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Wed Dec 12, 2007 12:40 am

So, can anyone name the service classes and service volumes of the various types of NDBs? Oh, and name all the applicable classes thereof?  mischievous 
Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
 
Mir
Posts: 19491
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2004 3:55 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Wed Dec 12, 2007 1:07 am



Quoting KELPkid (Reply 78):
So, can anyone name the service classes and service volumes of the various types of NDBs? Oh, and name all the applicable classes thereof?

Various types of whats?  Smile

Going off the top of my head:

LOM - 15 miles
L - 25 miles
H - 50 miles
HH - 75 miles

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
futurecaptain
Posts: 1918
Joined: Sat Sep 09, 2006 1:54 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Wed Dec 12, 2007 5:36 pm

1. What are the different kinds of icing and which is the worst hazard?

2. What effect does an aft CG have on an airplane's flight characteristics?

3. What are the steps to recover from a spin?

4. How many vacuum pumps are there on the C-172? And how will you know if the vacuum system has failed?

5. What are the steps to cool an overheated engine?


Now, a hypothetical question for you all to think about.  Smile

6. You are flying your C-172 in IMC on a XC flight. You are in the clouds and have complete electrical failure. What do you do?  Smile
AirSO. ASpaceO. ASOnline. ASO.com ASO. ASO. ASO. ASO. ASO.
 
nucsh
Posts: 181
Joined: Mon Apr 26, 2004 12:29 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Wed Dec 12, 2007 6:43 pm

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 80):
1. What are the different kinds of icing and which is the worst hazard?

2. What effect does an aft CG have on an airplane's flight characteristics?

3. What are the steps to recover from a spin?

4. How many vacuum pumps are there on the C-172? And how will you know if the vacuum system has failed?

5. What are the steps to cool an overheated engine?

1. Clear ice, rime ice, mixed ice, carb ice, and frost. Clear icing is the worst airframe icing, as it can avoid even sophisticated anti-ice systems. I'd still call carb icing the worst overall, because you can't really restart a frozen engine. Not that applies to most (if not all) newer piston aircraft in the skies today

2. An aft CG makes it harder for the pilot to control a pitch up attitude, and can result in stalls in critical phases of flight and severe tailstrikes on takeoff.

3. Neutral aileron positioning, cut power/throttle back to idle, full opposite rudder (gauged on the direction of the turn in the spin).

4. There are 2 - both engine driven. You'll know for sure when one or both fail by looking at your vacuum gauge.

5. (assuming we're still talking about a C172) Roll in mixture, cut back RPMs (if red-lining), pitch over for speed to increase airflow over the engine.

[Edited 2007-12-12 10:44:45]
If landing is about "kissing" the ground, you just about raped it.
 
nucsh
Posts: 181
Joined: Mon Apr 26, 2004 12:29 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Wed Dec 12, 2007 6:47 pm



Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 80):
6. You are flying your C-172 in IMC on a XC flight. You are in the clouds and have complete electrical failure. What do you do?

Bust out your transciever and notify ATC of the situation, ask for vectors to the nearest airport in VMC conditions and land as soon as practicable.
If landing is about "kissing" the ground, you just about raped it.
 
futterman
Posts: 1261
Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2003 11:04 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Wed Dec 12, 2007 7:13 pm

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 80):

2. What effect does an aft CG have on an airplane's flight characteristics?

An aft CG will make it harder to recover from a stall but easier to rotate and flare for landing (that is, if you are able to recover from the stall...). Within limits, you can also expect slightly greater cruise speeds as a result of less tail-down force from the horizontal stab and a lower AoA on the wings (less drag).

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 80):
3. What are the steps to recover from a spin?

I'll spit out the PARE acronym.

Power idle
Ailerons neutral
Rudder in the direction opposite the spin
Elevator aft (back pressure through neutral)

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 80):

4. How many vacuum pumps are there on the C-172? And how will you know if the vacuum system has failed?

I believe there is only one engine-driven vacuum pump on the 172. If it fails, you won't get an indication on the vacuum gauge and you'll lose the AI and DG. The Warriors I fly, on the other hand, have a standby electrically-driven vacuum pump you can hit if you lose the one connected to the engine.

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 80):

6. You are flying your C-172 in IMC on a XC flight. You are in the clouds and have complete electrical failure. What do you do? Smile

I assume this is an IFR flight, too. To the extent that you lost communication, you must fly: (1) route as last assigned, expected by ATC, then filed, at (2) the highest altitude among those assigned, expected, or published as the minimum IFR altitude. Squawk 7600, and either proceed to the nearest airport in VMC or, if stuck in the clag, fly an approach at pilot's discretion and adhere to all EACs and EFCs you may have received.

(Pretty sure about this...)
______

1. Name the 10 items that constitute 'runway environment' on an instrument approach.

2. Name the 13 required IFR reports (don't peek!).

3. Name the 5 approach categories (relating to aircraft) and the criteria for each, as well as how the criteria is determined.

4. What heading should you roll out on in a compass turn to the right from 225 to 285?


Brian

[Edited 2007-12-12 11:28:03]
What the FUTT?
 
KELPkid
Posts: 5247
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2005 5:33 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Wed Dec 12, 2007 7:23 pm



Quoting Futterman (Reply 83):
I believe there is only one engine-driven vacuum pump on the 172. If it fails, you lose the AI and DG (non-HSI). The Warriors I fly, on the other hand, have a standby electrically-driven vacuum pump you can hit if you lose the one connected to the engine.

Careful there, the newbies that fly around in the 172S's and SP's will promptly correct you on that  Wink It is quite true on the 172P (and older) 172's though...The worst, however, are the early 172's with the venturi vacuum system (which would promptly ice up upon entering significant visible moisture, like a juicy cloud...). Not that I'd ever seriously consider flying one of them IFR, anyways...no T-panel 6 pack in addition to the other drawbacks.

RE: the Warrior, I had a friend who owned a Cherokee 180, and it's standby vacuum was some sort of plumbing into the intake manifold, where if needed you pulled a knob, and it was able to power the HSI and attitude indicator from the engine vacuum (well, at high power settings, at least  Wink ). If you weren't pulling enough vacuum on the standby system, the attitude indicator would flop over like it does after you shut down on the ramp  Smile .
Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
 
KELPkid
Posts: 5247
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2005 5:33 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Wed Dec 12, 2007 7:26 pm



Quoting Nucsh (Reply 81):
1. Clear ice, rime ice, mixed ice, carb ice, and frost. Clear icing is the worst airframe icing, as it can avoid even sophisticated anti-ice systems. I'd still call carb icing the worst overall, because you can't really restart a frozen engine. Not that applies to most (if not all) newer piston aircraft in the skies today

I'd suggest changing "carb ice" to "intake ice." An air filter intake (usually flush with the cowling surface) can ice up on either a fuelie or a carbureted engine...  Wink
Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
 
KELPkid
Posts: 5247
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2005 5:33 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Wed Dec 12, 2007 7:45 pm

Quoting Futterman (Reply 83):
2. Name the 13 required IFR reports (don't peek!).

Established in a hold, altitude (upon initial contact with ATC), missed approach, instrumentation failures, mandatory reporting points (black triangle on the chart), current ATIS/AWOS/ASOS prior to approach, vacating an altitude, cancelling IFR, Speed change +/- 5% or 15 knots, diversion to alternate, traffic in sight or "We're IMC" when ATC calls traffic, Icing conditions...I think that's only 12, what'd I miss?  

EDIT: Aaah, arrival late by more than three minutes at a checkpoint in a non-radar IFR environment  Wink

[Edited 2007-12-12 11:47:37]
Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
 
Alias1024
Posts: 2652
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2004 11:13 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Wed Dec 12, 2007 7:47 pm



Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 80):
3. What are the steps to recover from a spin?

That depends on the aircraft.

Quoting Futterman (Reply 83):
I'll spit out the PARE acronym.

Power idle
Ailerons neutral
Rudder in the direction opposite the spin
Elevator aft (back pressure through neutral)

You might want some forward elevator to break the stall.

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 80):
6. You are flying your C-172 in IMC on a XC flight. You are in the clouds and have complete electrical failure. What do you do?

If I have a handheld transciever, pull that out and ask ATC for vectors to the nearest VMC airport. If I don't have a transciever, pull out my cell phone and do the same. If there isn't any nearby IMC, I'll ask for a no-gyro approach.

If I am unable to reach ATC but already know where the VMC is, I'll use dead reckoning to get there. If there isn't any VMC nearby, my only option is to use dead reckoning to get to an area with low terrain, descend down while keeping an eye on my altitude and hope to break out and scud run to the nearest airport. Yeah it's not desirable, but it's all you have at that point. All that stuff about assigned, expected, or filed goes out the window if my destination is IMC and I don't have any working instruments or communication equipment. It's an emergency and I can disregard anything in part 91 as long as I have a reason I'd feel comfortable explaining to the FAA.
It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems with just potatoes.
 
futterman
Posts: 1261
Joined: Wed Sep 24, 2003 11:04 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Wed Dec 12, 2007 7:54 pm

Quoting KELPkid (Reply 86):
Established in a hold, altitude (upon initial contact with ATC), missed approach, instrumentation failures, mandatory reporting points (black triangle on the chart), current ATIS/AWOS/ASOS prior to approach, vacating an altitude, cancelling IFR, Speed change +/- 5% or 15 knots, diversion to alternate, traffic in sight or "We're IMC" when ATC calls traffic, Icing conditions...I think that's only 12, what'd I miss? Sad

Not quite, at least according to my notes. This is what I have:

1. Leaving an assigned altitude
2. Time and altitude when entering a hold (at fix)
3. Leaving a hold
4. FAF
5. Missed Approach
6. Climbing to VFR-On-Top (and changing altitudes)
7. Unable at least +/- 500fpm
8. TAS +/- 5% or 10kts from filed, whichever is greater
9. Arrival time in error more than 3 minutes
10. Loss of Nav/Comm
11. Unforecast or hazardous weather
12. Anything else pertaining to the safety of flight (duh!)
13. Compulsory reporting points

Quoting Alias1024 (Reply 87):
You might want some forward elevator to break the stall.

Gah! Yeah, make that "release backpressure".  footinmouth 

Brian

[Edited 2007-12-12 11:57:31]
What the FUTT?
 
nucsh
Posts: 181
Joined: Mon Apr 26, 2004 12:29 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Wed Dec 12, 2007 7:55 pm



Quoting KELPkid (Reply 85):
I'd suggest changing "carb ice" to "intake ice." An air filter intake (usually flush with the cowling surface) can ice up on either a fuelie or a carbureted engine...

My mistake, you're absolutely right.  Smile
If landing is about "kissing" the ground, you just about raped it.
 
joness0154
Posts: 650
Joined: Sat Nov 19, 2005 12:56 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Wed Dec 12, 2007 7:55 pm

I thought we were keeping this to a FAR/AIM discussion?

There is one airport sign (that I know of) that is not depicted in the AIM. What is it?
I don't have an attitude problem. You have a perception problem
 
KELPkid
Posts: 5247
Joined: Wed Nov 02, 2005 5:33 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Wed Dec 12, 2007 8:06 pm

Here's one:

You are listening to ATIS at an airport in the Southwestern USA in the summer. The ATIS recording contians the words "Check density altitude." What does this mean?
Celebrating the birth of KELPkidJR on August 5, 2009 :-)
 
SUPRAZACHAIR
Posts: 474
Joined: Mon Feb 09, 2004 3:27 pm

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Wed Dec 12, 2007 9:08 pm



Quoting Alias1024 (Reply 87):
Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 80):
3. What are the steps to recover from a spin?

That depends on the aircraft.

Definitely one of the most overlooked facts since all our textbook are generally descended from the days or Cessna of nothing. There's even differences between the Warrior and the Arrow as far as stall recovery procedure order. It makes for an interesting discussion when you lay all three side by side and try and figure out why they are the way they are. Then throw in the Seminole which doesn't even have a spin recovery procedure and figure out what you'd do to recover... differential thrust anyone?

Quoting Futterman (Reply 83):
1. Name the 10 items that constitute 'runway environment' on an instrument approach.

(2) Runway/markings and lights
(3) Threshold, its markings and lights
(1) REILs
(2) Touchdown zone/markings and lights
(1) Approach lights
(1) VASI/PAPI

Quoting Futterman (Reply 83):
3. Name the 5 approach categories (relating to aircraft) and the criteria for each, as well as how the criteria is determined.

A= <91
B= 91-120
C= 121-140
D= 141-165
E= 165+

That be 1.3Vso (+1/2 gust factor is applicable)

Quoting Futterman (Reply 83):
4. What heading should you roll out on in a compass turn to the right from 225 to 285?

Depends on what part of the world you're in... in Western WA it'd be roughly 275ish, or just time it for 20sec.

Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 80):
6. You are flying your C-172 in IMC on a XC flight. You are in the clouds and have complete electrical failure. What do you do?

C'mon, throw some gas on that fire, you're flying in solid IMC from GEG-SEA, electrical dies, vaccum pumps all take a dump, and what the hell, a bird knocks off the pitot/static mast... d'oh!
 
Maverick623
Posts: 4722
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2006 9:13 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Wed Dec 12, 2007 10:27 pm



Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 92):
C'mon, throw some gas on that fire, you're flying in solid IMC from GEG-SEA, electrical dies, vaccum pumps all take a dump, and what the hell, a bird knocks off the pitot/static mast... d'oh!

Well, assuming you're flying a Cirrus, you slow up and pull the chute! Then quickly bust out your transciever (you better have one if you're doing IFR runs) and broadcast a mayday.
"PHX is Phoenix, PDX is the other city" -777Way
 
futurecaptain
Posts: 1918
Joined: Sat Sep 09, 2006 1:54 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Thu Dec 13, 2007 4:17 am



Quoting Futterman (Reply 83):
I assume this is an IFR flight, too. To the extent that you lost communication, you must fly: (1) route as last assigned, expected by ATC, then filed, at (2) the highest altitude among those assigned, expected, or published as the minimum IFR altitude. Squawk 7600, and either proceed to the nearest airport in VMC or, if stuck in the clag, fly an approach at pilot's discretion and adhere to all EACs and EFCs you may have received.

Complete Electrical Failure...
1. Try to hold your route with no VOR's, no GPS, no NDB, no radios, ect.
2. You could squawk 7600, except the transponder needs electricity...which you don't have.
3. Fly an approach with no electricity? What kind of instrument approach is that? I guess if you had a handheld you may get an ASR approach but even then you need to find a major airport first.

Good job remembering what to do with radio failure though.  Smile

Quoting Alias1024 (Reply 87):
If there isn't any nearby IMC, I'll ask for a no-gyro approach.

Electrical failure, not gyro failure. The only gyro you should lose in the situation is the turn coordinator.

Quoting Alias1024 (Reply 87):
descend down while keeping an eye on my altitude and hope to break out and scud run to the nearest airport. Yeah it's not desirable, but it's all you have at that point.

Thats the answer I gave to an examiner...after a long while of going over my options with him. He actually liked this answer, it is really all you can do. Decend slowly and scud run. Hopefully your preflight was good enough to know where the clouds are along your route and you know where you are when the power goes out. You still have an engine and 5 out of 6 of your main instruments, there's no reason to lose control.

Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 92):
Then throw in the Seminole which doesn't even have a spin recovery procedure

The Seminole isn't approved for spins, hence no published recovery. Of course this means the plane always feels like it wants to spin.  Wink

Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 92):
C'mon, throw some gas on that fire, you're flying in solid IMC from GEG-SEA, electrical dies, vaccum pumps all take a dump, and what the hell, a bird knocks off the pitot/static mast... d'oh!

 rotfl  The wing spar got knocked off and your gear won't come down. Your throttle is stuck, the flaps don't work, you just broke off the key in the socket, and the low fuel light is on.  Smile

Quoting Nucsh (Reply 81):
You'll know for sure when one or both fail by looking at your vacuum gauge.



Quoting Futterman (Reply 83):
If it fails, you won't get an indication on the vacuum gauge and you'll lose the AI and DG.

I should have specified the R/S models, which have 2 vacuum pumps.

Although, one pump should be enough for running the gyros so the gauge should still read in the green and you shouldn't lose the AI and DG. Hopefully your only indication of vacuum failure would be on the panel with the warning lights.
AirSO. ASpaceO. ASOnline. ASO.com ASO. ASO. ASO. ASO. ASO.
 
Alias1024
Posts: 2652
Joined: Mon Oct 25, 2004 11:13 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Thu Dec 13, 2007 7:16 am



Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 94):
Electrical failure, not gyro failure. The only gyro you should lose in the situation is the turn coordinator

Doh!!! I meant to say surveillance radar approach, but the no-gyro would work too. Basically, I need ATC to talk me down since my navigation recievers aren't powered.
It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems with just potatoes.
 
Mir
Posts: 19491
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2004 3:55 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Fri Dec 14, 2007 6:01 pm



Quoting SupraZachAir (Reply 92):
(1) VASI/PAPI

PAPIs don't count.

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day
 
futurecaptain
Posts: 1918
Joined: Sat Sep 09, 2006 1:54 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Fri Dec 14, 2007 6:45 pm



Quoting KELPkid (Reply 91):
You are listening to ATIS at an airport in the Southwestern USA in the summer. The ATIS recording contians the words "Check density altitude." What does this mean?

Just guessing, but I bet it means to check the density altitude.  Smile

Probably because of the high temperatures in the summer the density altitude is also very high. It wouldn't suprise me to see density altitudes around 3, 4, or even 5 thousand feet in the summer. That's really gonna eat into your aircraft performance.
AirSO. ASpaceO. ASOnline. ASO.com ASO. ASO. ASO. ASO. ASO.
 
777den
Posts: 50
Joined: Sun Dec 24, 2006 10:52 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Fri Dec 14, 2007 7:04 pm

or a hot summer day in PRC - I bet you could get a Density Alt of over 7000 ft
 
Mir
Posts: 19491
Joined: Mon Jan 05, 2004 3:55 am

RE: FAR/AIM Trivia Time!

Fri Dec 14, 2007 7:05 pm



Quoting Futurecaptain (Reply 97):
It wouldn't suprise me to see density altitudes around 3, 4, or even 5 thousand feet in the summer.

Hell, you could get 9 or 10 thousand foot density altitudes at some of the higher elevation airports.

-Mir
7 billion, one nation, imagination...it's a beautiful day

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