Page 1 of 1

Question About Ryanair

Posted: Mon Jul 23, 2012 3:25 am
by avi8
So I know they have a lot of bases. I an also aware that they focus primarily on O/D . So my question is: do they connect passengers in their large bases? Which is their largest base and how many flights does it have? How many more 737's are they receiving? Wha's the benefit if basing 2 737's in a city as opposed to basing them all in the same airports. How can this be economical??


Happy Monday y'all  

Question About Ryanair

Posted: Mon Jul 23, 2012 4:06 am
by Viscount724
Quoting avi8 (Thread starter):
my question is: do they connect passengers in their large bases?

Ryanair does not sell connections. Neither does EasyJet. If you want to connect you have to make 2 separate bookings and if you miss the second flight you get no refund and have to buy another ticket on a later flight.

Question About Ryanair

Posted: Mon Jul 23, 2012 7:53 am
by Joost
Quoting avi8 (Thread starter):
So my question is: do they connect passengers in their large bases?

No. They focus solely on O&D. Now there are people who make their own connections, but FR doesn't sell them as such nor guarantees them.

Quoting avi8 (Thread starter):
Which is their largest base and how many flights does it have?

Their largest base is STN. It has somewhere between 150 and 200 daily departures on FR.

Quoting avi8 (Thread starter):
How many more 737's are they receiving?

Their fleet is now at 294, and will grow to 305 next year.

Quoting avi8 (Thread starter):
Wha's the benefit if basing 2 737's in a city as opposed to basing them all in the same airports. How can this be economical??

Basing aircraft in various cities actually is a key element in their O&D flying business plan. As they don't connect, and if they want to bring passengers from EIN to AGP, they need to have an aircraft based in one of these cities in order to be able to operate the route.

When transporting a passenger from EIN to AGP, flying non-stop is always cheaper (for the airline) than offering a connection like EIN-STN-AGP. The only problem (and the reason there are network carriers) is, that you need to fill the plane.

Ryanair has found that on a certain kind of routes, low fares attract so many additional passengers, that they can fill a 738 on a non-stop flight and make it work. Ryanair matches supply to demand by simply lowering frequencies. For some kind of routes (like prime business routes) this doesn't work, but for vacation and VFR traffic, it has turned out to be a successful approach.

Question About Ryanair

Posted: Mon Jul 23, 2012 8:25 am
by Ps76
Hi!

My guess would be that very few people connect on Ryanair flights. Some people do it though. For example this guy in Bratislava:

http://www.tripadvisor.co.uk/ShowTop...ed_Mountfitchet_Essex_England.html

Or this Anetter flying from Cork to Dublin to Stansted:

Europe's Largest LCC For The First Time! Ryanair (by Kavs8 Jul 12 2012 in Trip Reports)

I think part of the reason may be because they tend to have a lot of destinations but only fly to them for the most part once or twice a day (sometimes even less). From my experience a lot of flights seem to leave at 6am or 9pm too! Plus of course if you miss a connection you have to wait and pay a ridiculously high ticket price for the next flight out.

Hope it might help.

Many thanks.

Pierre

Question About Ryanair

Posted: Mon Jul 23, 2012 8:42 am
Quoting Ps76 (Reply 3):
I think part of the reason may be because they tend to have a lot of destinations but only fly to them for the most part once or twice a day (sometimes even less).

They don't need to offer connections because it would increase costs, complexity, and responsibility with the earned revenues and generated yields insufficient to offset it.

[Edited 2012-07-23 01:43:55]

RE: Question About Ryanair

Posted: Mon Jul 23, 2012 9:14 am
by LX138
Quoting avi8 (Thread starter):
Wha's the benefit if basing 2 737's in a city as opposed to basing them all in the same airports. How can this be economical??

The business model of the carrier is so lean that basing 2 aircraft at an airport actually works. A more traditional carrier might be able to serve a couple of destinations twice a day whereas FR are sometimes offering 5/6 destinations twice daily with 2 aircraft! This is partly down to shorter turnaround times, less busy (and cheaper) airports, and thus shorter flight sectors. So it is economical for them.

RE: Question About Ryanair

Posted: Mon Jul 23, 2012 9:31 am
by Joost
Quoting Ps76 (Reply 3):
I think part of the reason may be because they tend to have a lot of destinations but only fly to them for the most part once or twice a day (sometimes even less).

Many Ryanair routes see less-than-daily frequencies. For example, from EIN, out of 27 routes, only STN is twice daily, 4 routes are daily and all other 22 are less-than-daily.

Quoting Ps76 (Reply 3):
From my experience a lot of flights seem to leave at 6am or 9pm too!

This is a direct result from their way of basing aircraft and scheduling. Aircraft based at an airport, need to fly as much as possible. Therefore, the schedule typically starts around 06:00am, and the objective is to get the aircraft in the air ASAP. At STN for example, between 06:00 and 07:30, FR (and U2) aircraft are lining up for departures, without any arrivals yet.

Most aircraft (depending on aircraft opening hours) return between 22:30 and 00:00. Evening rushes at 21:00 are usually the last departures for aircraft returning to their base.

Quoting LX138 (Reply 5):
A more traditional carrier might be able to serve a couple of destinations twice a day whereas FR are sometimes offering 5/6 destinations twice daily with 2 aircraft!

FR aircraft are usually flying 3 or 4 rotations per day. There are some schedules where 5 rotations are made (Irish sea crossings, Balearic islands - Spain, Italian islands - Italy), but these are quite rare. Most aircraft combine these short sectors with longer sectors.

Apart from smaller airports and shorter turnaround times, not scheduling connections makes the real difference in utilization. Network carriers like BA, KL or LH operate a hub with 'waves'; certain time periodes when many aircraft arrive in order to offer short connections. But this makes it harder to utilize aircraft to the max - as they are bound by the hub times.

RE: Question About Ryanair

Posted: Mon Jul 23, 2012 9:52 am
by Ps76
Hi!

Quoting joost (Reply 6):
This is a direct result from their way of basing aircraft and scheduling. Aircraft based at an airport, need to fly as much as possible. Therefore, the schedule typically starts around 06:00am, and the objective is to get the aircraft in the air ASAP. At STN for example, between 06:00 and 07:30, FR (and U2) aircraft are lining up for departures, without any arrivals yet.

Most aircraft (depending on aircraft opening hours) return between 22:30 and 00:00. Evening rushes at 21:00 are usually the last departures for aircraft returning to their base.

Many thanks. I just had a look at the Stansted website and sure enough there are departures all throughout the day. I think I got my impression from the fact that I'm always looking up day trips and places they fly to twice a day and these are almost always done in 6am/9pm pairs.

Many thanks.

Pierre

P.S. Sorry for going off topic.