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sq_ek_freak
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OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 11:16 am

I'll add this link to the master thread, but I thought this deserved its own thread because its the first that deals with a crew member's statement and also thought she deserved some highlighting:

http://www.philly.com/philly/news/20...7d06c40ecb14a38fd348cdcc6.html?c=r

As more stories emerge about the evacuation its starting to seem like her team did a great job in getting nearly 300 passengers off ASAP which given the fire that immediately ensued probably saved lots of lives.
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travelavnut
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 11:26 am

Like the CSM on the QF32 flight this is the kind of person you want in charge of the cabin, big thumbs up for her   

[Edited 2013-07-08 04:27:16]
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RussianJet
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 11:26 am

Thanks for posting. She sounds like a legend, completely professional and utterly competent.
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Flightsimboy
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 11:31 am

"She was so composed I thought she had come from the terminal," Hayes-White told reporters in a clip posted to YouTube. "She wanted to make sure that everyone was off. ... She was a hero."

She and her team are really heroes
  
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sq_ek_freak
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 11:42 am

Quoting flightsimboy (Reply 3):
She and her team are really heroes

Indeed. Photos are also popping up on Twitter of various cabin crew performing basic first aid on passengers on the runway/grass as firefighters tried to put out the blaze and first responders started tending to people...I'll try to dig them up and post links. Here's one photo though that the WSJ picked, and explained the back story to it:

http://blogs.wsj.com/dispatch/2013/0...co-crash-survivors-photo/?mod=e2fb

[Edited 2013-07-08 04:48:22]
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WNCrew
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 12:53 pm

Quoting sq_ek_freak (Reply 4):
Photos are also popping up on Twitter of various cabin crew performing basic first aid on passengers on the runway/grass as firefighters tried to put out the blaze and first responders started tending to people

Are there multiple photos? I've only seen this one....
ALL views, opinions expressed are mine ONLY and are NOT representative of those shared by Southwest Airlines Co.
 
Sinlock
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 12:54 pm

It's an interesting irony that at one moment you're seen as no more than a "sky waitress" then the next you become someone's link to life
 
sq_ek_freak
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 1:27 pm

Quoting wncrew (Reply 5):
Are there multiple photos? I've only seen this one....

Yeah I've seen three others. There was one of two cabin crew huddled around a person who's bleeding, it looks as though they took off their uniform scarves and used them as a makeshift tourniquet. There's another of a crew member holding up and hugging a young child, and there's another of a crew who looks to be administering some basic first aid on a passenger who's sitting on the grass next to the runway. I think this still was used in an abc news piece on the crash too. I saw them all on twitter but there's so many posts on this accident that I'm having trouble tracking them down...kicking myself for not getting the links when I saw them.
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lastrow
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 1:42 pm

Quoting flightsimboy (Reply 3):
She and her team are really heroes
  

  
exactly, her attitude is so impressive.

and it also shows that experience and professionalism are so important and should be in place. If I consider the cost cutting direction that some carriers force here in central Europe to lower cabin crew cost I feel just bad for the future. That is the main problem: The are going to cut down the reserves while reserves and redundancy are a basic concept of safety.

[Edited 2013-07-08 06:45:02]
 
DTWPurserBoy
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 2:47 pm

Quoting sq_ek_freak (Reply 4):

Indeed. Photos are also popping up on Twitter of various cabin crew performing basic first aid on passengers on the runway/grass as firefighters tried to put out the blaze and first responders started tending to people..

This Asiana flight attendant crew WERE the first responders. They did a textbook evacuation.

I am truly in awe of their skills, composure and humility.

After 38 years as a purser and flight attendant I have never had to face to situation that they did but they did it by the book--they assessed conditions OUTSIDE the aircraft and realized there was fire and obstructions on a/c right so they used a/c left for the evac.

Now, does anyone have any questions on why we ask you to open your window shades for takeoff and landing?
Qualified on Concorde/B707/B720/B727/B737/B747/B757/B767/B777/DC-8/DC-9/DC-10/A319/A320/A330/MD-88-90
 
bioyuki
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 3:12 pm

Can someone post the original video? The video on that article is now an interview of a crash survivor.
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cedarjet
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 3:59 pm

I have been thinking about flying Asiana lately, they're kind of a sleeper in Star Alliance next to big names like Singapore, Thai and Nippon. You'd think an accident would make a person think twice about booking an airline but this really seals the deal for me, next time I'm heading east, I know who I'll be flying with.
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anstar
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 4:34 pm

Amazing... and I have to say Kudos to the cabin crew.. apparently 7 out of 12 were knocked out on landing.... great work done by those that evacuated the passengers and their colleagues as well as those that assisted after the crash.
 
bcbhokie
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 5:29 pm

There's a clear reason Asiana wins awards left and right - my personal experience with their onboard service on a few flights last year was absolutely flawless. The only other airline I've flown that in my opinion even comes close is Qatar.

Thanks for posting this - I was curious for more stories about the evacuation process itself. It doesn't surprise me that the crew handled it so well - it's unfortunate that press coverage is focused on the inexperience of the captain on the aircraft type, because the story of the cabin crew will be lost in the shuffle and they'll be denied their deserved credit as heroes.
 
LO231
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 6:24 pm

Quoting Sinlock (Reply 6):

Want to run the term trolley dolly by me again, someone?

Tears in my eyes and kudos to ALL professional men and women that take care of us in the air, and now, as proven, on the ground, too... They have families you know, their passengers seem to be a part of it...

Just touched.

PS. I am not talking about Ryanair, on mine one was sleeping too in the galley

[Edited 2013-07-08 11:39:03]
Got both LO 788 frames already, next LO E95 and 734 BRU-WAW-BRU
 
LO231
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 6:53 pm

I would not doubt a second t'o step on board with OZ, I swear.
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LO231
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 6:59 pm

And if they ever find a way to blame it on a pilots, I will still congratulate them.

I have my heroes, OZ and LO cpt Wrona whom I flew with from EWR to WAW.
Got both LO 788 frames already, next LO E95 and 734 BRU-WAW-BRU
 
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PA110
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 7:05 pm

I certainly applaud the professionalism of the cabin crew and the exemplary way they evacuated the aircraft. They are a credit to their profession. But, before I rush to get on an Asiana flight, I would have serious concern for the competency of their pilots and training. Everything seems to be pointing towards gross negligence in the cockpit.
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LO231
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 7:13 pm

Quoting PA110 (Reply 17):

Will you ask them before boarding if they are drunk or whats your plan? You can fly.... SU.. Lol

I usually dont ask the pilots upon boarding if they fly the plane... Its a given, I thought, and if its their fault, then we should punishball the car drivers in the world, because its always their fault...
Got both LO 788 frames already, next LO E95 and 734 BRU-WAW-BRU
 
SonomaFlyer
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 7:32 pm

The NTSB will be evaluating crew performance and survivability factors as part of their investigation. They will be looking at the issue of how the slides could've deployed within the plane. For some reason, I thought there was a mechanism that wouldn't allow inflation unless the corresponding door was opened and only then it would inflate outwards.

The crew was obviously well trained and performed extremely well under very difficult circumstances. It's even more amazing given several flight attendants were knocked out/injured in the crash and yet 316 people were able to evacuate the a/c quickly.

Bravo to the cabin crew!
 
OOSGB
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 8:06 pm

Thumbs up to cabin staff like them. There are no words to praise the result of their work. Reminds me also of AF cabin staff in YYZ.
 
Carfield
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 8:20 pm

For those who said that flight attendants from Asian Airlines are only good for looking and serving, not good in safety, I hope this incident will throw away any doubts about the ability of one of the flight attendants form one of the best airlines in the world to carry out their safety duties. They sure are well trained in the service aspect but are also good in their primary duties - safety.

I 100% agree with DTWPurserBoy about the window shades must be up during takeoff and landing. I always fly a window seat and always lift up my windows regardless during takeoff and landing. US airlines in general are very relaxed in that rules. Virgin America always has the window shades down in first class during boarding to showcase the mood lighting. I always lift them up immediately. Some airlines ask passengers to shut their window blinds during those turnaround during the summer, and I hope they will ask their passengers to lift the window shades after boarding is completed. I was on a British Airways San Diego to London Heathrow flight once, when every window shades are closed during boarding. I presume it was a late night departure and the F/As were too lazing to ask people to shut them after takeoff. I was like shocked and could you imagine how dangerous the situation was if something happened during takeoff.

Thanks for sharing!

Carfield
 
DTWPurserBoy
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 9:08 pm

Quoting Carfield (Reply 21):
I 100% agree with DTWPurserBoy about the window shades must be up during takeoff and landing. I always fly a window seat and always lift up my windows regardless during takeoff and landing. US airlines in general are very relaxed in that rules.

Thanks for the acknowledgment. You would not believe how much pushback I get from people when I ask them to raise the shades. It is a part of our normal preflight safety announcement but I don't mind explaining why.

Next, let me remind everyone to leave your shoes on for takeoff and landing. Who wants to climb over twisted burning metal in their bare feet? An educated passenger is a living passenger at times like this. We should do a better job of explaining the "why" in requests. We are not being harda**es--we are trying to keep everyone safe.
Qualified on Concorde/B707/B720/B727/B737/B747/B757/B767/B777/DC-8/DC-9/DC-10/A319/A320/A330/MD-88-90
 
GT4EZY
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 10:46 pm

Hats off to the crew. Do I think they were exceptional compared to other crews that have found themselves in similar situations? I don't know. It's not something that is easily quantifiable or comparable. What is clear is that they did their job well, a job that is their primary role. As someone mentioned earlier, it is amazing how passengers perception of crew can change quickly dependent on the scenario they find themselves in.

Sometimes the role of the cabin crew in evacuations/incidents gets lost and I think it is great that the Asiana crew are being recognised. Worryingly, in recent evacuations here in the UK (where crew also did a fantastic job in evacuating pax) the crew have been accused by passengers of 'screaming', 'pushing people down slides' and being in a state of panic. A perfect example of the way the crews role is misunderstood.
Proud to fly from Manchester!
 
SEA
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 11:13 pm

Quoting DTWPurserBoy (Reply 22):
Thanks for the acknowledgment. You would not believe how much pushback I get from people when I ask them to raise the shades. It is a part of our normal preflight safety announcement but I don't mind explaining why.

Is it possible the majority of the shades could be down from the forces of impact and the plane doing a nearly 360ˆ turn?
 
olliejolly
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Mon Jul 08, 2013 11:50 pm

It just shows, I believe FA's are really undervalued to perhaps most people that fly.
I am always disappointed when boarding/disembarking an aircraft as to the attitude of people to them.
For example my last flight from TFS to MAN with ZB we were leaving the plane and of course there were flight attendants standing by the door smiling and saying goodbye, and yet most people just seemed to ignore them and continue leaving.
My family and I thanked them and wished them good day, and yes a few other people did, but even so, the majority seemed to just want to get their bags and get home.

Anyway my point is, it just shows, with this situation being a remarkable example, the flight attendants had no prior warning to what was about to happen, they had just had a lengthy flight with apparently no unusual events and right as they are landing and getting into the state of mind of finishing the flight and maybe getting some good rest, this happens and they have to spring into action.

Yes it's their job, but much credit and respect to them, they may have saved a lot of people's lives.
 
smi0006
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Tue Jul 09, 2013 1:00 am

Quoting OllieJolly (Reply 25):
Anyway my point is, it just shows, with this situation being a remarkable example, the flight attendants had no prior warning to what was about to happen, they had just had a lengthy flight with apparently no unusual events and right as they are landing and getting into the state of mind of finishing the flight and maybe getting some good rest, this happens and they have to spring into action.

I don't know about OZ but at my carrier when I used to be crew, during every take-off and approach we conducted a silent review, to ensure we were in the state of mind for an emergency. If I recall correctly the acronym was OLDABC went something like:

Operation of Exits
Location of emergency equipment.
Drill. This was then broken down into the following:
Signal - What was the signals to Brace (eg PA, flashing seatbelt sign)
Commence Commands
Maintain Brace
Await instructions - Await instructions from the tech crew to evacuate, commence precautionary disembarkation, or wait stairs.
Open Exit / Block Exit
Direct Evacuation
Check aircraft
Take equipment
Evacuate
Able body passenger - Anyone in the cabin who may assist us.
Brace position -which one we should be using for that seat on the aircraft
Commands - Review all brace and evacuation commands

The review prompted crew to think constantly about the situation they where in and how best to respond. So theoretically (which I feel the fantastic performance of the OZ crew indicate), cabin crew are generally always in an alerted state of mind for an emergency, not saying of course they expect one. But their training especially in critical phases of flight should be at their fore front of mind. Only once they are taxing into the gate should they start to unwind.

Congratulations to the efforts of the OZ crew and the team of crash responder in SFO.
 
m11stephen
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Tue Jul 09, 2013 2:57 am

Quoting OllieJolly (Reply 25):
It just shows, I believe FA's are really undervalued to perhaps most people that fly.
I am always disappointed when boarding/disembarking an aircraft as to the attitude of people to them.

That's because the vast majority of flight attendants will never face a situation like this and will never save a life. Kudos to this crew and kudos to the ABPs (Able bodied passengers) who assisted in the evacuation.
My opinions, statements, etc. are my own and do not have any association with those of any employer.
 
N505fx
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Tue Jul 09, 2013 5:42 am

Quoting Carfield (Reply 21):
Virgin America always has the window shades down in first class during boarding to showcase the mood lighting.

This always struck me as odd on VX, almost like showing off their cool, clubby mood lighting and hip boarding music is more important than safety...not saying that those operating the flight aren't concerned about passenger safety, it just seems like the marketing and product positioning guys are winning out over those who run a hard core airline operation.
 
usafdo
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Tue Jul 09, 2013 6:14 am

SFO Airport Surveillance camera videos.

Where are the videos that the SFO Airport Authority has?

Every single major U.S. airport has hundreds of surveillance camaeras recording everything going on.

How come they have not released their videos of the different angles of the crash while it is occurring?
 
visualapproach
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Tue Jul 09, 2013 6:57 am

Quoting usafdo (Reply 29):

Because perhaps they are essential for the integrity of the investigation and not exactly (at present) appropriate for general public release?
 
nclmedic
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Tue Jul 09, 2013 8:05 am

Quoting SonomaFlyer (Reply 19):
They will be looking at the issue of how the slides could've deployed within the plane. For some reason, I thought there was a mechanism that wouldn't allow inflation unless the corresponding door was opened and only then it would inflate outwards.

It appears the chutes malfunctioned when the cabin crew attempted to open some of the doors, and this will be something the NTSB will review. Really frightening stuff considering it not only disabled a number of the crew but also presumably blocked off access to other parts of the cabin. I'm not sure from the photos whether any of the left side exits were opened armed as doors 3 and 4 are angled towards the ground so you can imagine had slides been deployed at this exit they might have entered the cabin....
 
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a36001
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Tue Jul 09, 2013 8:33 am

I am in awe of this crew. Seeing pics of one of the crew piggy backing a passenger away from harm, her total mind set was on the safety of her passengers, considering she had just gone through the same crash as the passengers and would no doubt be suffering shock, its remarkable, extraordinary and totally selfless. I hope they all receive an award for bravery.  
 
[email protected]
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Tue Jul 09, 2013 8:34 am

All the FAs are heros for doing their job, despite being injured and shocked by the nature of the accident just like any other passengers in the cabin. End of the day...except for the 2 unfortunate young girls (RIP) who lost their lives...everyone else made it out of the burning plane ...its a testament to Asiana FA's commitment and training. Hats off to you FAs.

I always respected FAs whenever i travel as a passenger or when am on duty...now my respect has just grown ten fold more.
 
bwaflyer
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Tue Jul 09, 2013 8:54 am

Quoting Carfield (Reply 21):
I was on a British Airways San Diego to London Heathrow flight once, when every window shades are closed during boarding. I presume it was a late night departure and the F/As were too lazing to ask people to shut them after takeoff. I was like shocked and could you imagine how dangerous the situation was if something happened during takeoff.

Other than window shades at emergency exits, there is no requirement to have shades open at BA.
 
DTWPurserBoy
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Tue Jul 09, 2013 11:34 am

Quoting SEA (Reply 24):
Quoting DTWPurserBoy (Reply 22):Thanks for the acknowledgment. You would not believe how much pushback I get from people when I ask them to raise the shades. It is a part of our normal preflight safety announcement but I don't mind explaining why.
Is it possible the majority of the shades could be down from the forces of impact and the plane doing a nearly 360ˆ turn?

I was not referring the position of the window shades on OZ214. I was referring in general that shades should be open for all takeoffs and landings so that the flight attendants AND passengers can assess conditions outside the aircraft and determine the best escape route. As we always say "Remember--the closest exit may be behind you." We do not want to open a door in an emergency if there is fire or other obstructions but rather redirect passengers forward, aft or across. Unfortunately, there have been many accidents where passengers ran past several good exits and instinctively head towards the door that they boarded from and lost their lives as a result.

I remember one sad CO accident on the DC-10 where the f/a at door 3L realized there was fire on the wings and was redirecting passengers to other exits when an older couple pushed her out of the way, opened the exit and ran out onto the wing--only to perish in the fire. As I recall they were the only fatalities even though the aircraft was destroyed.

One person on here talked about the "silent review." At DL we do this for every takeoff and landing, mentally reminding ourselves of what to do in what order if there is an emergency. It's not something we talk about to non-crew members mainly because it may not make sense to them but it is critical to use. It is usually covered in our preflight briefing by the purser. We also sit on our hands for takeoff and landing so that they will not flail about, breaking an arm during a critical period.
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davescj
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Tue Jul 09, 2013 12:09 pm

Quoting Carfield (Reply 21):
I 100% agree with DTWPurserBoy about the window shades must be up during takeoff and landing. I always fly a window seat and always lift up my windows regardless during takeoff and landing. US airlines in general are very relaxed in that rules. Virgin America always has the window shades down in first class during boarding to showcase the mood lighting. I always lift them up immediately. Some airlines ask passengers to shut their window blinds during those turnaround during the summer, and I hope they will ask their passengers to lift the window shades after boarding is completed.

I totally agree. I know DL (as noted by DTWPurseBoy) generally will ask widow shades DOWN after you get to the gate while the planes are turned. If you've been in ATL during summer, you know why. I'd say about 50% of the time I see them raised after the A/C turns on. Usually I'm in F (upgrade) or Y+, and I notice most people at the window habitually open the shade after the boarding door is closed. I do. And this is the reason.

Quoting DTWPurserBoy (Reply 22):
You would not believe how much pushback I get from people when I ask them to raise the shades. It is a part of our normal preflight safety announcement but I don't mind explaining why.

I would believe it. My home airport is MEM. I find (oddly) the RJ crews are much more attentive to ask people to raise the shade.

Quoting DTWPurserBoy (Reply 22):
Next, let me remind everyone to leave your shoes on for takeoff and landing. Who wants to climb over twisted burning metal in their bare feet? An educated passenger is a living passenger at times like this. We should do a better job of explaining the "why" in requests. We are not being harda**es--we are trying to keep everyone safe.
Quoting DTWPurserBoy (Reply 35):
As we always say "Remember--the closest exit may be behind you." We do not want to open a door in an emergency if there is fire or other obstructions but rather redirect passengers forward, aft or across. Unfortunately, there have been many accidents where passengers ran past several good exits and instinctively head towards the door that they boarded from and lost their lives as a result.

I'm one of those odd people - I look for two exits on every plane (for and aft of where I am ) and actually read the emergency card to see how the exits work (esp if I'm in a exit row).

On South African, when I've flown on them, and you're sitting in the exit row, the FA asks for confirmation in ENGLISH not only that you are willing to assist, but requires that you can explain in English how to open the exit.

I was flying JNB - Kinshasa (DRC) and there was one person in the exit row who did not speak English. He was not allowed to sit there for that reason.

Reading stories like this - you understand the reason. As FA's say endlessly - #1 is safety.

Dave
Can I have a mojito on this flight?
 
LO231
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Tue Jul 09, 2013 1:05 pm

Quoting Davescj (Reply 36):

On LO and LX recently I was approached by a flight attendant, they wanted to explain to me how to open the emergency exit row door. If I couldnt or wouldnt willing to, they would be happy to reseat me.

Proffessionalism, I call it.

I was also asked if willing to assist others in case of emergency, because on the likes of E95 and AR1, they wouldnt be around to do it... They would guard the big doors
Got both LO 788 frames already, next LO E95 and 734 BRU-WAW-BRU
 
tonystan
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Tue Jul 09, 2013 3:50 pm

Quoting Carfield (Reply 21):
I 100% agree with DTWPurserBoy about the window shades must be up during takeoff and landing. I always fly a window seat and always lift up my windows regardless during takeoff and landing. US airlines in general are very relaxed in that rules. Virgin America always has the window shades down in first class during boarding to showcase the mood lighting. I always lift them up immediately. Some airlines ask passengers to shut their window blinds during those turnaround during the summer, and I hope they will ask their passengers to lift the window shades after boarding is completed. I was on a British Airways San Diego to London Heathrow flight once, when every window shades are closed during boarding. I presume it was a late night departure and the F/As were too lazing to ask people to shut them after takeoff. I was like shocked and could you imagine how dangerous the situation was if something happened during takeoff.

Carfield, in your post you alone have managed to highlight the ignorance that exists from passengers towards crew. In your post you state that the BA crew where too lazy, not doing their job correctly and deliberately putting your life in danger!

Well you're wrong. Why are you wrong? Because you assume! Like many passengers who just assume cabin crew are brain dead unqualified bimbos there to give you whatever you want!

Now, just FYI....BA have no requirement to have window blinds open for takeoff or landing unless on or adjacent to emergency exits. Why? Well I don't know but it is permitted under UK CAA regulations. However BA does have a policy of "heat reduction" on its aircraft when on the ground (did you know the B787 actually has an automatic setting for heat reduction on he ground). Those "lazy" crew will often be found tripping up over your discarded garbage to lean into seats and close the window blinds after all customers have disembarked. Why? Because it assists in keeping the cabin cool in warmer climates especially when the sun is beaming in. Now you didn't hear those lazy crew demand you close you're window blind after you landed did you? However leaving SAN those closed blinds where actually an action taken by crew to ensure that you had a comfortable experience!!!!!!!!

So, I suggest you stop immediately thinking the worst of people and realise that infact those lazy, terrible, unsafe and inconsiderate crew where actually doing their job correctly and just because its not something you have experienced before does not mean it was wrong! Roll your tongue in!!!

Peace and love everyone!
My views are my own and do not reflect any other person or organisation.
 
sq_ek_freak
Topic Author
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Tue Jul 09, 2013 6:46 pm

Quoting nclmedic (Reply 31):
It appears the chutes malfunctioned when the cabin crew attempted to open some of the doors, and this will be something the NTSB will review. Really frightening stuff considering it not only disabled a number of the crew but also presumably blocked off access to other parts of the cabin. I'm not sure from the photos whether any of the left side exits were opened armed as doors 3 and 4 are angled towards the ground so you can imagine had slides been deployed at this exit they might have entered the cabin....

Can't confirm this at all, and we'll hear confirmation once the NTSB investigation is out, but my guess is that they inflated inside the aircraft due to the violent landing/skid, rather than the cabin crew opening the exits and the slides inflating inwards. By the time the aircraft had stopped the slides had already inflated inside the cabin pinning the crew down, and the available cabin crew immediately reached for the emergency axes upon seeing this to free their colleagues.

Quoting DTWPurserBoy (Reply 35):
One person on here talked about the "silent review." At DL we do this for every takeoff and landing, mentally reminding ourselves of what to do in what order if there is an emergency. It's not something we talk about to non-crew members mainly because it may not make sense to them but it is critical to use. It is usually covered in our preflight briefing by the purser. We also sit on our hands for takeoff and landing so that they will not flail about, breaking an arm during a critical period.

Yep. And to that person who asked earlier in this thread, that's pretty much a universal procedure. I remember a friend of mine telling me she had gotten worried on a particular flight that something was wrong, because she was sat at an exit and the two crew in front of her were happily chatting away, but the moment the aircraft began turning onto the active, they both stopped talking, placed their hands under their knees, kept quiet and looked forward, seeming very concentrated. I laughed and explained what they were doing. It actually made her realize a different aspect of the job, and made her feel more comfortable.
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DTWPurserBoy
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RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Wed Jul 10, 2013 11:38 am

Wow--MSNBC just had a piece on the accident and they said that two flight attendants were thrown from the aircraft on impact. They sustained injuries. My guess is that it was the two that were sitting at 4L. I had been wondering why the door was torn off.

Regarding the slides inflating in the cabin I could see how that happened. 777 doors are very big and the slide pack is as well. When I was trained on the 777 I was told that when opening the doors in emergency mode to rotate the handle and give the door a good shove and stand back while the auto-assist takes over. If the inflation started before the door was fully opened it could easily jam the door and keep it from operating properly. IIRC that is no longer being taught that way. I wonder if they will return to the original method. Boeing should have some valuable input on that.

FINALLY people are questioning those who not only took luggage but even their duty free purchases when they evacuated!
Qualified on Concorde/B707/B720/B727/B737/B747/B757/B767/B777/DC-8/DC-9/DC-10/A319/A320/A330/MD-88-90
 
sq_ek_freak
Topic Author
Posts: 1180
Joined: Fri Dec 15, 2000 4:48 pm

RE: OZ 214 Cabin Manager Answers Questions

Wed Jul 10, 2013 2:28 pm

Evacuation complete, emergency services there, how powerful is this photo, passengers and crew contemplate what just happened to them:

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