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tjcab
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 5:42 pm

Add:

MEA - CEDAR JET
 
Ideekay
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 5:47 pm

British Airways - Shuttle
Easyjet switzerland - Topswiss
SkyWork Airlines - Skyfox
TUIfly Nordic - Bluescan
 
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American 767
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 6:12 pm

Continental Express in EWR, it used to be Jet Link.

US Air Express in the Northeast, it used to be Commutair.

AOM/Air Liberte, it's French Lines.

United Express in IAD, it's Blue Ridge.
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SRQKEF
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 6:12 pm

Quoting Ideekay (Reply 51):

As mentioned above, BA is actually "Speedbird", while "Shuttle" is used for domestic flights.

Icelandic airlines:

Icelandair: "ICE AIR"
Air Iceland: "FAXIi" (means horse in Icelandic, due to the winged horse in the livery)
Ernir: "ARCTIC EAGLE"
Air Atlanta Icelandic: "ATLANTA"
Bluebird: "BLUE CAEGO"

defunct ones:

Landsflug: "ISLANDIA"
Islandsflug: "ICEBIRD"
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slcguy
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 6:36 pm

Miami Air - Biscayne
 
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KGRB
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 7:20 pm

Quoting American 767 (Reply 52):
US Air Express in the Northeast, it used to be Commutair.

This thread is about airlines whose call signs differ from their name. While the marketing name for Commutair was "USAir Express" (they're now a United Express carrier), the carrier's actual name is Commutair.

Quoting American 767 (Reply 52):
United Express in IAD, it's Blue Ridge.

Blue Ridge was the call sign for Atlantic Coast Airlines, not all United Express carriers.
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migair54
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 7:34 pm

Qatar airways is Qatari
Fastjet uses Grey bird, the logo.
 
BigSaabowski
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 8:18 pm

Quoting American 767 (Reply 52):
Continental Express in EWR, it used to be Jet Link.

That was the callsign of ExpressJet ailines, before the merger with Atlantic Southeast.
 
YYCFlyer
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 8:20 pm

Thomas Cook Airlines

IATA: MT
ICAO: TCX
Callsing: Kestrel

They are all over the place.
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yv773p
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 8:56 pm

Isn't American Eagle's Eagleflight?
Even the lazy jellyfish do it!
 
twal1011727
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 8:57 pm

Quoting maxpower1954 (Reply 41):
Delta's name predates the use of "Delta" in the Phonetic Alphabet. Prior to 1956 it was "Dog" (Able, Baker, Charlie, Dog, Easy, Fox, ect.)

Yep.....thats how my dad got his Navy nickname....His initials are D.E. so his call sign is "Dog Easy"
He stills uses it 70 yrs after his fellow Navy buddies gave it to him.

KD
 
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KGRB
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 9:01 pm

Although it doesn't differ greatly from the airline name, Air Wisconsin's call sign is "Wisconsin."

Quoting BigSaabowski (Reply 57):

That was the callsign of ExpressJet ailines, before the merger with Atlantic Southeast.

ExpressJet Airlines used to be named Continental Express before it was sold off by Continental.

Quoting yv773p (Reply 59):
Isn't American Eagle's Eagleflight?

It was, when the carrier was named American Eagle Airlines. Today, Envoy's call sign is "Envoy."
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blueflyer
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 9:11 pm

Quoting ZKOJQ (Reply 18):

Quoting B777LRF (Reply 17):
TNT: Nitro

I thought it was 'Quality'? Definitely one of my favorites.

Quality is the call sign for TNT Airways, the current air ops of TNT based in LGG.
Nitro was the call sign for TNT International.
Another TNT call sign is Skyjet, used by their Spanish subsidiary Pan Air.

Quoting XAM2175 (Reply 36):
Quoting Starbucks (Reply 12):
Brussels Airways - B-Line

Rendered as BEELINE, and an interesting harkening to British European and their use of BEALINE.

I think it has more to do with it being the airline with the large stylized B on the tail of its planes.

Quoting jetmatt777 (Reply 2):
Republic - Brickyard

A nod to its origins in Indianapolis I suppose?
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wjcandee
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 9:33 pm

Eastwind -- "Bumblebee"
 
sunnyflyer
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 9:40 pm

I guess no one remembers Northeast Airlines, "Yellowbird"
 
Wingtips56
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 10:05 pm

The late Apollo Airways (ID) based at SBA was "Sonic". Not sure where the name came from, but it would make sense if it came from the deafening Turbomeca Astazou engines on their Handley Page Jetstreams.
Worked for WestAir, Apollo Airways, Desert Pacific, Western, AirCal and American Airlines (Retired). Flight Memory: 181 airports, 92 airlines, 78 a/c types, 403 routes, 58 countries (by air), 6 continents. 1,119,414 passenger miles.

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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 10:27 pm

Air Canada - Air Canada's (Sorry, couldn't resist. The propensity of some AC pilots to say Air Canada's XXX is a running joke in Canadian Aviation)
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J/S DH8D 736/7/8 763
 
aa87
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 10:29 pm

Quoting jetmatt777 (Reply 2):
Spirit - Spiritwings
Quoting 77west (Reply 1):
Air New Zealand - New Zealand
Quoting ZKOJQ (Reply 18):
Transaero is 'Transoviet'.

Who exactly gets to choose callsigns ? My picky comments from the peanut gallery:

1) A callsign should not consist of the actual name plus more stuff. Spirit doesn't need a callsign, its simple, short and impossible for anyone who speaks even passable English to mispronounce. In fact, they should be charged an unnecessary callsign fee for simply adding to their name (actually, strike that - Spirit would simply pass the fee on to pax, w a mark up).

2) "New Zealand" ?!?! seriously ? not Kiwi or something clever ? sorry, that doesn't count as a callsign. Its their name. That would be like Delta saying its callsign is ... Delta.

3) If Transaero thinks "Soviet" is so retro cool, why don't they make that their official name and start flying TU-154s. Cool name, dumb callsign.

Best callsigns ever were/are Clipper, Speedbird and Cactus (in that order).

Biggest mystery - why did American never have a callsign ?
 
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lapper
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 10:34 pm

It's interesting trying to find out the history of some of the call signs.

Another couple for you:
Aer Lingus - Shamrock
British Airtours - B Tours
BA Cityflyer - Flyer
S7 Airlines - Siberian Airlines
Open Skies - Mistral

When Concorde was flying it had the call sign Sppedbird Concorde
 
matthewkellyva
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 10:43 pm

For sure my favourite is Tiger Airways in Australia, which use 'GoCat'.
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OB1504
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 11:39 pm

Quoting JohnGalt (Reply 48):
Sky King had the call sign "Songbird", which was taken from the name of the aircraft in the radio/TV show "Sky King" from the 1940s/50s.

Sky King changed their name to Songbird Airways when they emerged from bankruptcy and now their name matches their callsign and ICAO code (SGB).
 
TCX69K
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Wed Jul 22, 2015 11:41 pm

Thomas Cook Airlines UK have had 3 callsigns up to now. None of which is their actual name.

– Topjet
– Globe
– Kestrel

UK charter airline FlyJet used to have "Envoy". Which was also used by UK charter airline Airworld.

Which leads to the question. What/how many callsigns have been used for more than one carrier?
 
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KGRB
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Thu Jul 23, 2015 12:01 am

Quoting aa87 (Reply 67):
Biggest mystery - why did American never have a callsign ?

Are you asking why they never had a "unique" call sign (like Speedbird or Cactus)? Because they certainly do have a call sign -- it's "American."
First flight: NW DC-10 MKE-MSP December 1996
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JBo
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Thu Jul 23, 2015 12:10 am

Quoting aa87 (Reply 67):

Who exactly gets to choose callsigns ? My picky comments from the peanut gallery:

Methinks you protesteth a bit too much.  

I believe ICAO is in charge of managing call signs, just like the unique 3-letter identifier that each airline uses in ATC.

(Some folks on this thread don't seem to realize it, but the 2-letter IATA codes we commonly use in this forum are ONLY used on the ticketing/pax service side of airline operations. They aren't used in air ops/air traffic control at all. That's where the 3-letter codes and the callsigns come in).

As for why some airlines have callsigns that are slightly different from their name, why not?

In the case of Spirit, they originally started as "Charter One Airlines," and may have adopted the "Spirit Wings" call sign to be uniquely identifiable on the radio prior to changing their name to "Spirit Airlines." I don't know the exact history, but the idea that they adopted the "Spirit" name from their callsign is not implausible.

Also, there used to be an airline called "Kiwi International" that used the 'Kiwi' callsign.

The only purpose of an carrier callsign is to clearly identify a particular operator without confusion to other carriers. There is no requirement for it to be cute or creative; it only needs to be unique among other carriers.

In fact, this is why Shuttle America recently changed its callsign from "Shuttlecraft" to "Mercury," to avoid confusion with Mesa's "Air Shuttle" call sign.

Also, Delta's callsign IS "Delta."  

In fact, for the most part, mainline carriers just use their name for their callsign, but indeed there are a number of colorful alternatives.

In my experience, at least with US airlines, regional carriers tend to have more colorful callsigns as a part of their history.

Trans States, for example, uses the callsign "Waterski." That and its ICAO code "LOF" harken back to its beginnings as "Resort Air" carrying passengers to Lake of the Ozarks in Missouri.

Some callsigns, though, are unnecessarily awkward. Skyway Airlines -- YX's regional subsidiary -- used the phonetically awkward callsign "Skyway Ex" (which, during my time there, was often shortened to "Skyex" by crews). The main reason for this was to differentiate it from the Florida-based cargo carrier of the same name (which uses the callsign "Skyway Inc").

Also, to combine a few of the things other folks are mentioning:

ExpressJet, which was Continental Express until CO divested the subsidiary, used the callsign "Jetlink" with the BTA ICAO code, and adopted the XE IATA code when it started its own branded flights several years ago.

Upon its acquisition by SkyWest and integration with ASA, ExpressJet kept the ASA callsign and flight codes: "Acey," ASQ, and EV while retaining the "Expressjet" name.

Confused yet?

As for some other neat callsigns:

Great Lakes uses "Lakes Air"
Chicago Express, when it was around, used "WIndy City" and the ICAO code "WDY."
Atlantic Coast Airlines used the "Blue Ridge" callsign before it became Independence Air.
ACA's subsidiary, Atlantic Coast Jet (that flew 328JETs for Delta) used the "Patriot" callsign.
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badgervor
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Thu Jul 23, 2015 12:10 am

Just ones I'm thinking of that haven't been mentioned....

Atlas Air-Giant
Chicago Express (defunct)- Windy City
American Trans Air (defunct)-Amtram
Air Cargo Carriers-Night Cargo
Cargo 360 (defunct)-Long Haul
 
aa87
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Thu Jul 23, 2015 12:41 am

Quoting jbo (Reply 73):
There is no requirement for it to be cute or creative

Agreed, not a legal requirement, but shouldn't they be ? A cool, creative callsign should be mandatory.
 

Yes, most US carriers have used their name as their callsign (AA, UA, NW, DL, NA), but I never thought of those as callsigns. Yes, I get it, they are, but to me a callsign was always a nickname. You wouldn't say "I'm Rick, but you can call me Rick". And before someone flames me for some reason, I'm just having fun with this thread.

Also forgot to give a shout out to Shamrock. That is one of the best, along with possibly the most beautiful livery in the air. And my parents just visited Ireland for vacation and flew DL. No offense to Delta, but I told them it was sacrilege not to fly EI.
 
beechnut
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Thu Jul 23, 2015 12:57 am

Quoting briguychau (Reply 11):
Central Mountain Air = 'Glacier'
Canadian North = 'Empress'

Glad they kept this one alive. I'm old enough to remember that "Empress" was also the callsign for Canadian Pacific Airlines/CP Air.

And I'm surprised nobody mentioned "Clipper", the call sign for the late lamented Pan American World Airways.

Beech
 
flyDTW1992
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Thu Jul 23, 2015 1:00 am

Quoting maxpower1954 (Reply 41):
There is some confusion, notably in Atlanta where any "D" gate or taxiways are called "Dixie" because of the many Delta flights . If Delta was a startup, "Dixie" would be a cool call sign though!

DTW uses Dixie to refer to the D gates a lot, though not officially like ATL, and we have no Taxiway D.
Now you're flying smart
 
PDX88
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Thu Jul 23, 2015 1:03 am

Didn't find anyone mention SeaPort, who uses callsign Sasquatch.
 
flyaas80
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Thu Jul 23, 2015 1:44 am

Quoting KGRB (Reply 61):
Although it doesn't differ greatly from the airline name, Air Wisconsin's call sign is "Wisconsin."

Here is a hilarious clip here where PHL tower is helping Air Wisconsin find a new callsign. Also great to here someone who truly loves their job,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_0zjhSYimM
The only way to fly is by the seat of your pants...
 
thegoldenargosy
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Thu Jul 23, 2015 4:16 am

Aer Lingus: Shamrock
Air BC: Aircoach
Air Florida: Palm
Air Holland: Orange
Airtours International: Tourjet
Air 2000: Jetset
Air South: Khaki Blue
Canada 3000: Elite
CCAir: Carolina
Deutsche BA: Speedway
Eastwind: Stinger
Express One International: Longhorn
Great Lake Airlines: Lakes Air
LTE: Funjet
Midway Airlines: Jetex
Premiair: Viking
Spanair: Sunwing
Southern Airways Express: Lightspeed
TEA Switzerland: Topswiss
USA 3000: Getaway
Virgin Express: Belstar
VLM: Rubens
Western Pacific: Komstar
 
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lapper
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Thu Jul 23, 2015 6:27 am

I don't see how BA can use Beeline when under tow if Brussels Airlines also uses it and visits Heathrow.
 
flyiguy
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Thu Jul 23, 2015 6:34 am

Quoting American 767 (Reply 52):
United Express in IAD, it's Blue Ridge.

Blue Ridge was Atlantic Coast / Independence Air

FLY
The opinions I post are of mine and mine alone, not of the airline I work for.
 
AWACSooner
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Thu Jul 23, 2015 7:57 am

Quoting clickhappy (Reply 7):
National (N7) was "Red Rock." Which, if you've ever been to Vegas, makes sense.

God I miss that airline...they had the coolest looking tail EVER!

Quoting Starbucks (Reply 12):
Norwegian Air Shuttle - NorShuttle

I actually have heard "Norge Shuttle" for them.

Quoting B777LRF (Reply 17):
TNT: Nitro

It's actually "quality" for them...at least that's what our 757 combi uses.
 
iRISH251
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Thu Jul 23, 2015 8:12 am

Quoting aa87 (Reply 67):
2) "New Zealand" ?!?! seriously ? not Kiwi or something clever ? sorry, that doesn't count as a callsign. Its their name. That would be like Delta saying its callsign is ... Delta.

"Kiwi" is used by the Royal New Zealand Air Force, certainly for international flights.
 
starbucks
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Thu Jul 23, 2015 8:52 am

Quoting AWACSooner (Reply 83):
I actually have heard "Norge Shuttle" for them

Very well possible, I never checked how it should be written, this is how I pronounce it at work  
 
axelesgg
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Thu Jul 23, 2015 10:01 am

Quoting thunderboltdrgn (Reply 30):
Reply 14
Swedish Höga Kusten flyg (HK) calls themselves Golden.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H%C3%B6ga_Kusten_Flyg

Not really my friend, Golden Air was "Golden" and operated for Höga Kusten Flyg.
Now Golden is Braathens Regional, who soon will rebrand to BRA.      
Fly Draganair
 
JohnGalt
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Thu Jul 23, 2015 2:54 pm

Quoting OB1504 (Reply 70):
Sky King changed their name to Songbird Airways when they emerged from bankruptcy and now their name matches their callsign and ICAO code (SGB).

Was unaware they were back around. Thanks!
 
Viscount724
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Fri Jul 24, 2015 3:17 am

Quoting briguychau (Reply 11):
Canadian North = 'Empress'

It was nice to see Canadian North resurrect the old Canadian Pacific/CPAir callsign "Empress" that was used for decades.

Most CP Air aircraft were also named "Empress of xxx" for cities/countries and later Canadian provinces in their route network.

The "Empress" name and callsign dated back to the 1800s and Canadian Pacific's ocean liners that were also named "Empress of xxx" for countries they served. CP's last ocean liner/cruise ship, Empress of Canada, was sold to Carnival Cruise Lines and became their very first ship, Mardi Gras.
 
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lammified
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Fri Jul 24, 2015 8:41 am

One of the newer callsigns around - Nokscoot: Big Bird
 
DeltaRules
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Fri Jul 24, 2015 2:33 pm

I think Winair, the famous resident of SXM, used/uses Windward.

Quoting PSAjet17 (Reply 45):
This callsign goes back to the days of America West Airlines. America West flew in the same skies as American Airlines, Western Airlines and also Southwest. When communicating with ATC, it could be confusing...did the controller just call America West or was that American?(Especially if part of the transmission gets cut off or walked over)

Being headquartered in Phoenix, America West chose the alternate name of CACTUS to help avoid confusion. When America West and US Airways were joined, they chose to keep the CACTUS callsign even though the company name became US Airways.

A similar thing happened with AirTran, which sounded awfully similar to American Trans Air (ATA/TZ). TZ used Amtran, so AirTran went completely different and chose Citrus.
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beechnut
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Fri Jul 24, 2015 5:01 pm

Quoting Viscount724 (Reply 88):
It was nice to see Canadian North resurrect the old Canadian Pacific/CPAir callsign "Empress" that was used for decades.

Most CP Air aircraft were also named "Empress of xxx" for cities/countries and later Canadian provinces in their route network.

Pity Air Canada didn't pick up on that tradition as a memorial to CP when it was merged/folded into AC. It would have been a nice touch. If not the callsign, then at least naming the aircraft. But I guess "Impératrice de Tokyo" wouldn't roll off the tongue so well in French.

Beech
 
LH648
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Fri Jul 24, 2015 5:43 pm

Air Astana - Astanaline
SCAT Airlines - Vlasta
 
vv701
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Fri Jul 24, 2015 8:41 pm

In addition to 'Speedbird' and 'Shuttle' BA have a third ICAO Call-sign, 'Santa'. This is only used for charter flights to RVN. These flights are primarily operated out of LGW in the first three weeks in December. Last year most were operated on behalf of Canterbury Travel. The aircraft used were either A 320s or A 319s. All these flights also operated with the ICAO Code 'XMS' instead of the usual 'BAW'.

The most appropriate codes used last December were on an LGW-RVN-LGW rotation on 17 December operated by A 319 G-DBCD. The outward flight used the flight code 'XMS024', the homeward flight 'XMS025'.
 
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cougar15
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Fri Jul 24, 2015 9:14 pm

Quoting blueflyer (Reply 62):
Another TNT call sign is Skyjet, used by their Spanish subsidiary Pan Air.

what? Panair Skyjet? Never heard that one in the past 17 odd years. Panair flights all operate as ´Quality´, as do most of their (TNT) ACMI Flights (Bluebird,ABX, Swift,West Atlantic etc etc).
It use to be ´Nitro´ but I certainly have never heard from/of a Panair flight with a Skynet callsign , but may be wrong!

I always liked 'Nitro', it´ s so fitting for an Airline called TNT - but I guess someone somewhere thought ´Quality´ was more appropriate:
some you lose, others you can´t win!
 
vv701
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Sat Jul 25, 2015 10:00 am

In addition to 'Speedbird' and 'Shuttle' BA also uses the 'Santa' ICAO Call Sign. It uses this in conjunction with the 'XMS' ICAO Flight Code on Chrsitmas charter flights to RVN, primarily from LGW.

As an example on 17 December last year BA A319 G-DBCD operated a LGW-RVN-LGW BA8606C / BA8607C charter rotation to Santaland on behalf of Canterbury Travel. These flights used the 'Santa' call sign and the flight codes XMS024 /XMS025 instead of the more conventional BAW8606 and BAW8607.
 
Wingtips56
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Sat Jul 25, 2015 8:00 pm

Maybe I missed it here, but I thought "Critter" for Valujet was cute. An homage to the little guy in their livery.
Worked for WestAir, Apollo Airways, Desert Pacific, Western, AirCal and American Airlines (Retired). Flight Memory: 181 airports, 92 airlines, 78 a/c types, 403 routes, 58 countries (by air), 6 continents. 1,119,414 passenger miles.

Home airport : CEC
 
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gunsontheroof
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Sat Jul 25, 2015 11:58 pm

Quoting PDX88 (Reply 78):
Didn't find anyone mention SeaPort, who uses callsign Sasquatch.

I used that for a fictional airline I had in MSFS years ago. Thought it was pretty funny when SeaPort adopted it--definitely one of the better ones!

Neither here nor there, but I always thought it'd be cool if AS switched their callsign to "Chester."  
Picked a hell of a week to quit sniffing glue.
 
PITrules
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Sun Jul 26, 2015 12:37 am

"Star Check" for AirNet Express

Quoting flyiguy (Reply 82):

Blue Ridge was Atlantic Coast / Independence Air

"Blue Ridge" was Atlantic Coast
"Independence" was Independence Air
FLYi
 
su184
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RE: Differing Callsigns From Airline Names

Mon Jul 27, 2015 1:13 pm

Middle East Airlines - CedarJet
Nile Air - NileBird

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Military Aircraft Every type from fighters to helicopters from air forces around the globe

Classic Airliners Props and jets from the good old days

Flight Decks Views from inside the cockpit

Aircraft Cabins Passenger cabin shots showing seat arrangements as well as cargo aircraft interior

Cargo Aircraft Pictures of great freighter aircraft

Government Aircraft Aircraft flying government officials

Helicopters Our large helicopter section. Both military and civil versions

Blimps / Airships Everything from the Goodyear blimp to the Zeppelin

Night Photos Beautiful shots taken while the sun is below the horizon

Accidents Accident, incident and crash related photos

Air to Air Photos taken by airborne photographers of airborne aircraft

Special Paint Schemes Aircraft painted in beautiful and original liveries

Airport Overviews Airport overviews from the air or ground

Tails and Winglets Tail and Winglet closeups with beautiful airline logos